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  • Author: Tadasu Ohshige x
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Yoshifumi Kijima, Ryoji Kiyama, Masaki Sekine, Toshiyo Tamura, Toshiro Fujimoto, Tetsuo Maeda and Tadasu Ohshige

The purpose of this study was to clarify whether a gait analysis using an accelerometer could estimate gait independence. Eighty-six stroke patients and 21 healthy control subjects participated in this study. Stroke patients were identified as dependent or independent based on their gait ability. The acceleration of the trunk and bilateral thigh was measured using three wireless sensors during walking. The root mean square, gait regularity, and symmetry were calculated from the acceleration to estimate gait quality. ANCOVA showed that gait regularity of the trunk and bilateral thigh were significantly lowest in the dependent group, regardless of gait velocity. A logistic regression analysis showed that the regularity and root mean square of the anteroposterior acceleration of the unaffected thigh were the key factors for estimating gait independence. This study suggests that an acceleration-based gait analysis facilities gait independence estimation, and is a useful tool during the rehabilitation of stroke patients.

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Yuki Uto, Tetsuo Maeda, Ryoji Kiyama, Masayuki Kawada, Ken Tokunaga, Akihiko Ohwatashi, Kiyohiro Fukudome, Tadasu Ohshige, Yoichi Yoshimoto and Kazunori Yone

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint.

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Ken Tokunaga, Yuki Nakai, Ryo Matsumoto, Ryoji Kiyama, Masayuki Kawada, Akihiko Ohwatashi, Kiyohiro Fukudome, Tadasu Ohshige and Tetsuo Maeda

This study evaluated the effect of foot progression angle on the reduction in knee adduction moment caused by a lateral wedged insole during walking. Twenty healthy, young volunteers walked 10 m at their comfortable velocity wearing a lateral wedged insole or control flat insole in 3 foot progression angle conditions: natural, toe-out, and toe-in. A 3-dimensional rigid link model was used to calculate the external knee adduction moment, the moment arm of ground reaction force to knee joint center, and the reduction ratio of knee adduction moment and moment arm. The result indicated that the toe-out condition and lateral wedged insole decreased the knee adduction moment in the whole stance phase. The reduction ratio of the knee adduction moment and the moment arm exhibited a close relationship. Lateral wedged insoles decreased the knee adduction moment in various foot progression angle conditions due to decrease of the moment arm of the ground reaction force. Moreover, the knee adduction moment during the toe-out gait with lateral wedged insole was the smallest due to the synergistic effect of the lateral wedged insole and foot progression angle. Lateral wedged insoles may be a valid intervention for patients with knee osteoarthritis regardless of the foot progression angle.