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  • Author: Tao Chen x
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Tao Chen, Kenji Narazaki, Yuka Haeuchi, Sanmei Chen, Takanori Honda and Shuzo Kumagai

Background:

This cross-sectional study was performed to examine associations of objectively measured sedentary time (ST) and breaks in sedentary time (BST) with instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) disability in Japanese community-dwelling older adults.

Methods:

The sample comprised 1634 older adults (mean age: 73.3 y, men: 38.4%). Sedentary behavior was measured using a triaxial accelerometer. Disability was defined as inability in at least 1 of the IADL tasks using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence.

Results:

After adjusting for potential confounders and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), longer ST was significantly associated with higher likelihood of IADL disability, whereas a greater number of BST was associated with lower likelihood of IADL disability. ST and BST remained statistically significant after mutual adjustment with odds ratio of 1.30 (95% confidence interval [CI)], 1.00–1.70) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.65–0.99), respectively.

Conclusions:

This study first demonstrated that shorter ST and more BST were associated with lower risk of IADL disability independent of MVPA and that the association for ST was independent of BST and vice versa. These findings suggest not only total ST but also the manner in which it is accumulated may contribute to the maintenance of functional independence in older adults.

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Dahai Yu, Ying Chen, Tao Chen, Yamei Cai, Rui Qin, Zhixin Jiang and Zhanzheng Zhao

Background: Chronic kidney disease is common and brings significant health burden. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity and kidney function. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study set in the Nanjing Community Cardiovascular Risk Survey, using random cluster sampling. Questionnaires were completed, wherever possible, through face-to-face interviews. Data on age, sex, body mass index, weekly physical activity, and kidney function were collected. Physical activity was measured by the metabolic equivalent of task-minutes per week and grouped into “walking,” “moderate,” and “vigorous” according to intensity. Kidney function was measured by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, in mL/min/1.73 m2). Regression modeling was used to investigate the proposed relationship with adjustment for other confounding factors. Results: A total of 5824 participants were included, with an average age of 52; 44% were male. The eGFR in average was 76 mL/min/1.73 m2, with 19% ≥ 90, 67% between 60 and 89, and 14% < 60. In average, the total physical activity during a week was 3644 MET-minutes per week. Moderate activity contributed 64% of the total activity, followed by walking (23%) and vigorous activity (13%). Overall, the total activity was weakly associated with eGFR (P = .039). However, in stratified analysis, only walking-related activity was associated with eGFR (P < .0001) after confounding adjustment. Conclusions: Walking is associated with improved kidney function.

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Guohua Zheng, Xin Zheng, Junzhe Li, Tingjin Duan, Kun Ling, Jing Tao and Lidian Chen

This study investigated the effects of Tai Chi compared with no exercise control on the cerebral hemodynamic parameters and other health-related factors in community older adults at risk of ischemic stroke. A total of 170 eligible participants were randomly allocated to Tai Chi or control group. The cerebral hemodynamic parameters and physical fitness risk factors of cardiovascular disease were measured at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. After the 12-week intervention, Tai Chi significantly improved the minimum of blood flow velocity (BFVmin); BFVmean; pulsatility index and resistance index of the right anterior cerebral artery; and BFVmax, BFVmin, and BFVmean parameters of the right middle cerebral artery. Tai Chi training also decreased triglyceride, fasting blood glucose, and homocysteine levels, and improved balance ability. Therefore, the supervised 12-week Tai Chi exercise had potential beneficial effects on cerebral hemodynamics, plasma risk factors, and balance ability in older community adults at risk of ischemic stroke.