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Aoife Lane, Niamh Murphy, Adrian Bauman and Tien Chey

Background:

To promote maintenance of sufficient physical activity (PA), better understanding of factors associated with behavioral relapse is needed.

Purpose:

To identify PA relapsers and predictors of this state in a large community sample of women who participated in 2 mass 10-km events in Ireland.

Methods:

Relapsers to ‘low active’ were identified at 3-month follow-up, and factors associated with relapse investigated.

Results:

11% of the sample decreased their participation by at least 60 minutes of moderate-intensity PA per week and regressed to ‘insufficiently active.’ Adjusted analysis indicated relapse was associated with walking the event (OR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.05−1.85) and not achieving tertiary education (OR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.18−1.88). Normal-range BMI, training continuously, urban residence, and increases in self efficacy and positive perceptions of the physical environment were related to lower incidence of relapse.

Conclusion:

Education, living in an urban area, BMI, walking the event, training, and self efficacy are all associated with relapse and while mass events are a useful motivator for PA, strategies are required following events to maintain participation levels and generate a lasting public health impact.

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Michael L. Booth, Anthony D. Okely, Tien Chey and Adrian E. Bauman

This study examined the pattern of activity energy expenditure (AEE) among New South Wales (NSW) high school students in relation to age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), place of residence, cultural background, season, participation in moderate- and vigorous-intensity and in organized and non-organized physical activity.

Methods:

Cross-sectional survey of a randomly-selected sample (N = 2026). Respondents self-reported their physical activity participation during a usual week in summer and winter.

Results:

Boys reported greater AEE than girls and, whereas AEE was greater among grade 10 than grade 8 boys, the reverse was true for girls. Boys reported the same AEE for summer and winter, but girls reported less AEE during winter. Both boys and girls reported spending the same proportion of their AEE in vigorous-intensity (72%) compared with moderate-intensity activity (28%) and in non-organized (60%) compared with organized activity. There was no clear association between urban/rural place of residence and AEE. Although AEE tended to be positively associated with SES among girls, there was no association among boys. Girls from Asian cultural backgrounds reported much lower AEE than girls from other cultural backgrounds.

Conclusion:

Patterns of energy expenditure among adolescent boys and girls should be considered in developing interventions to ensure needs are adequately met.

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Heather R. Bowles, Dafna Merom, Tien Chey, Ben J. Smith and Adrian Bauman

Background:

The aim of this study was to examine the associations between characteristics of recreational activity and total physical activity (PA).

Methods:

Recreational activity type and number were assessed for 3,385 adult respondents to the population-based Exercise Recreation and Sport Survey and categorized as “no recreational activity,” “walking only,” “sport only,” or “combined walking and sport.” Total PA was assessed by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and categorized as “low,” “moderate,” or “high.”

Results:

Odds of high total PA were 1.7 times greater among walking-only participants, 2.9 times greater among sport-only participants, and 3.3 times greater among participants in combined walking and sport compared to no recreational activity participants. Greater number of recreational activities related to increased odds of high total PA. Similar associations were observed between recreational activity and moderate total PA.

Conclusion:

Participants in more than one type of recreational activity were less likely to have a low-active lifestyle.

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Bill Reger-Nash, Adrian Bauman, Linda Cooper, Tien Chey, Kenneth J. Simon, Maria Brann and Kevin M. Leyden

Background:

WV Walks replicated the Wheeling Walks community-wide campaign methodology to promote physical activity.

Methods:

A social marketing intervention promoted walking among insufficiently active 40- to 65-year-olds throughout the television media market in north-central West Virginia. The intervention included participatory planning, an 8-week mass media-based campaign, and policy and environmental activities. Pre and post random-digit-dial cohort telephone surveys were conducted at baseline and immediately postcampaign in intervention and comparison regions.

Results:

The campaign resulted in maximal message awareness in north-central WV and demonstrated a significant increase in walking behavior represented by an absolute shift of 12% of the target population from insufficiently active to active (≥30 minutes, 5 days per week), versus the comparison community (adjusted odds ratio 1.82, CI: 1.05−3.17). Policy and environmental changes were also evident.

Conclusions:

This replication study increases our confidence that the initial effects observed in the Wheeling Walks intervention are generalizable to other similar rural communities.