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  • Author: Toni Torres-McGehee x
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Jennifer L. Gay, Eva V. Monsma, Alan L. Smith, J.D. DeFreese and Toni Torres-McGehee

Growth and maturation may impact adolescent behavior and development of psychological disorders. Currently age at menarche is used as the primary marker of maturation, even though it occurs later than other indicators of growth such as peak height velocity (PHV). Maturity offset predicting age at PHV has not been validated in diverse samples. Anthropometric measures and self-reported age at menarche were obtained for 212 female athletes ages 11 to 16 years (M = 13.25). Shared variance between menarcheal age and estimated age at PHV (APHV) was small (R 2 = 5.3%). Discriminant validity was established by classifying participants as pre- or post-PHV or menarche (X2 = 32.62, P < .0001). The Pearson’s correlation between chronological age and age at PHV (r = .69) was stronger than with age at menarche (r = .26). Making informed decisions about accounting for growth and maturation using estimated age at PHV are offered.

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Dawn M. Emerson, Toni M. Torres-McGehee, Susan W. Yeargin, Kyle Dolan and Kelcey K. deWeber

Despite cool environments, ice hockey athletes are predisposed to hypohydration due to extensive equipment, high intensity activity, and high sweat rates. The purpose of this study was to determine hydration practices and awareness of fluid recommendations among athletic trainers (ATs) working with NCAA Division I, NCAA Division III, and professional ice hockey teams. Most professional ATs (90.1%) utilized at least one hydration status measure, while 61.7% of collegiate ATs did not measure hydration. Compared to Division I, more Division III ATs did not have electrolyte supplements (p < .001) and believed they did not have adequate access through budget/sponsorship (p < .001). Both professional (72.0%) and collegiate (53%) ATs reported athletes had open access to electrolyte supplements or gave them to any athlete who asked. Athletic trainers provided patient education and had fluids accessible to athletes. Areas to improve clinical practice include monitoring electrolyte supplement access and collegiate ATs assessing hydration status.

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Dawn M. Emerson, Toni M. Torres-McGehee, Susan W. Yeargin, Kyle Dolan and Kelcey K. deWeber

An athletic trainer’s (ATs) role requires current knowledge about factors that can influence hydration status. The purpose of this study was to determine awareness of alcohol and caffeine effects on hydration. Participants were 94 ATs with NCAA Division I or III men’s and/or women’s ice hockey teams and 82 head ATs with professional ice hockey teams. The majority of ATs were correct regarding alcohol’s effects on hydration, specifically knowing alcohol increases urine output (92.1%), delays fluid recovery (81.7%), and dehydrates a euhydrated individual (83.5%). In contrast, fewer ATs were correct that moderate, regular consumption of caffeine does not cause dehydration (20.7%), delay fluid recovery (15.2%), or impair fluid regulatory hormones (9.8%). While ATs were knowledgeable about alcohol effects, there remains misconceptions about caffeine on hydration.