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  • Author: Tricia J. Hubbard x
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Benito J. Velasquez

Edited by Tricia Hubbard

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Tricia J. Hubbard, John E. Kovaleski and Thomas W. Kaminski

Context:

Measurement reliability is critical when new sports-medicine devices or techniques are developed.

Objective:

To determine the reliability of laxity measurements obtained from an instrumented ankle arthrometer.

Design:

Intratester reliability was examined using a test–retest design, and intertester reliability was assessed using the measurements recorded by 2 different examiners on a separate group of participants.

Setting:

Sports-medicine research laboratory.

Participants:

40 participants with no history of ankle injury, equally divided across the 2 studies.

Measurements:

Laxity measurements included anteroposterior (AP) displacement during loading to 125 N. Inversion–eversion (I–E) rotation was tested during loading to 4000 N-mm. The measures were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and dependent t tests.

Results:

Good to excellent ICCs (.80–.99) for intratester and intertester reliability. A significant difference in measures was observed between testers for both AP displacement and I–E rotation.

Conclusions:

Laxity measurements from an instrumented ankle arthrometer are reliable across test days and examiners

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Robert J. Casmus and Kevin E. Burroughs

Edited by Tricia J. Hubbard

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Tricia J. Hubbard

Column-editor : Thomas W. Kaminski

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Charlie A. Hicks-Little, Richard D. Peindl, Tricia J. Hubbard-Turner and Mitchell L. Cordova

Context:

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating disease that affects an estimated 27 million Americans. Changes in lowerextremity alignment and joint laxity have been found to redistribute the medial and/or lateral loads at the joint. However, the effect that changes in anteroposterior knee-joint laxity have on lower-extremity alignment and function in individuals with knee OA remains unclear.

Objective:

To examine anteroposterior knee-joint laxity, lower-extremity alignment, and subjective pain, stiffness, and function scores in individuals with early-stage knee OA and matched controls and to determine if a relationship exists among these measures.

Design:

Case control.

Setting:

Sports-medicine research laboratory.

Participants:

18 participants with knee OA and 18 healthy matched controls.

Intervention:

Participants completed the Western Ontario McMaster (WOMAC) osteoarthritis questionnaire and were tested for total anteroposterior knee-joint laxity (A-P) and knee-joint alignment (ALIGN).

Main Outcome Measures:

WOMAC scores, A-P (mm), and ALIGN (°).

Results:

A significant multivariate main effect for group (Wilks’ Λ = 0.30, F 7,26 = 8.58, P < .0001) was found. Knee-OA participants differed in WOMAC scores (P < .0001) but did not differ from healthy controls on ALIGN (P = .49) or total A-P (P = .66). No significant relationships were identified among main outcome measures.

Conclusion:

These data demonstrate that participants with early-stage knee OA had worse pain, stiffness, and functional outcome scores than the matched controls; however, ALIGN and A-P were no different. There was no association identified among participants’ subjective scores, ALIGN, or A-P measures in this study.

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Debbie I. Craig

Edited by Tricia J. Hubbard

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Michael E. Powers, Bernadette D. Buckley, Thomas W. Kaminski, Tricia J. Hubbard and Cindy Ortiz

Context:

The combined effects of strength and proprioception training, especially in individuals with ankle instability, have not been studied extensively.

Objective:

To examine the influence of 6 weeks of strength and proprioception training on measures of muscle fatigue and static balance in those with unilateral functional ankle instability (FAI).

Design:

Pretest–posttest, randomized groups.

Setting:

A climate-controlled sports-medicine research laboratory.

Subjects:

38 subjects with self-reported unilateral FAI.

Measurements:

Muscle fatigue was determined using the median power frequency (f med) from an electromyographic signal, and static balance was assessed using center-of-pressure values obtained from a triaxial force plate.

Results:

There were no significant effects of the strength or proprioception training on our measures of muscle fatigue and static balance.

Conclusions:

Strength training, proprioception training, and the combination of the 2 failed to improve postural-stability characteristics in a group of subjects with FAI.

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Debbie I. Craig

Edited by Tricia J. Hubbard

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Tricia J. Hubbard and Andrew P. Flavell

Edited by Joseph J. Piccininni

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J. Brett Massie, David V. Donnelly and Kimberly L. Ricker

Edited by Tricia Hubbard