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Tricia Majewski-Schrage and Kelli Snyder

Clinical Scenario:

Managing edema after trauma or injury is a primary concern for health care professionals, as it is theorized that delaying the removal of edema will increase secondary injury and result in a longer recovery period. The inflammatory process generates a series of events, starting with bleeding and ultimately leading to fluid accumulation in intercellular spaces and the formation of edema. Once edema is formed, the lymphatic system plays a tremendous role in removing excess interstitial fluid and returning the fluid to the circulatory system. Therefore, rehabilitation specialists ought to use therapies that enhance the uptake of edema via the lymphatic system to manage edema; however, the modalities commonly used are ice, compression, and elevation. Modalities such as these may be effective at preventing swelling but present limited evidence to suggest that the function of the lymphatic system is enhanced. Manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) is a manual therapy technique that assists the lymphatic system function by promoting variations in interstitial pressures by applying light pressure using different hand movements.

Focused Clinical Question:

Does MLD improve patient- and disease-oriented outcomes for patients with orthopedic injuries?

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Tricia Majewski-Schrage, Todd A. Evans and Brian Ragan

Context:

Despite widespread acceptance, there is currently no consensus on the definition, components, and the specific techniques most appropriate to measure and quantify core stability.

Objective:

To develop a comprehensive core-stability model addressing its definition, components, and assessment techniques.

Design:

Delphi technique.

Setting:

University laboratory.

Participants:

15 content experts from United States and Canada, representing a variety of disciplines.

Main Outcome Measure:

The authors distributed an open-ended questionnaire pertaining to a core-stability definition, components, and assessment techniques specific to each expert. They collected data over 2 rounds of telephone interviews. They concluded data collection once a consensus was achieved that equated with 51% agreement among respondents.

Results:

The authors developed a working definition of core stability as the ability to achieve and sustain control of the trunk region at rest and during precise movement. Eighty-three percent of the experts considered the definition satisfactory. Therefore, the definition was accepted. Furthermore, the experts agreed that muscles (14/15 = 93.3%) and neuromuscular control (8/12 = 66.7%) were components of core stability. Assessment techniques were identified and inconsistencies were highlighted; however, no consensus was established.

Conclusions:

A consensus core-stability definition was created and 2 components were identified. However, of the initial definitions provided by the experts, no 2 were identical, which revealed the inconsistencies among experts and the importance of this study. Nonetheless, the goal of obtaining a consensus definition was obtained. Although a consensus for the assessment techniques of core stability could not be reached, it was a beneficial starting point to identify the inconsistencies that were discovered among the content experts.