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Tzai-Li Li and Michael Gleeson

This study compared immunoendocrine responses to a single bout of prolonged cycling at different times of day and to a 2nd bout of cycling at the same intensity on the same day. In a counterbalanced design, 8 men participated in 3 experimental trials separated by at least 4 d. In the afternoon exercise-only trial, subjects cycled for 2 h at 60% VO2max starting at 14:00. In the other 2 trials, subjects performed either 2 bouts of cycling at 60% VO2max for 2 h (starting at 09:00 and 14:00) or a separate resting trial. The single bout of prolonged exercise performed in the afternoon induced a larger neutrophilia and monocy-tosis than the identical bout of morning exercise, possibly the result of reduced carbohydrate availability and the circadian rhythm in cortisol levels. The 2nd prolonged exercise bout caused greater immunoendocrine responses but lower plasma glucose levels and neutrophil function compared with the 1st bout.

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Tzai-Li Li, Ching-Ling Wu, Michael Gleeson and Clyde Williams

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of pre-exercise high carbohydrate meals with high glycemic index (HGI) or low glycemic index (LGI) on blood leukocyte redistribution during subsequent endurance exercise. Eight male subjects performed a 90-min run on a treadmill at 70% VO2max 3 h after ingesting an isocaloric HGI or LGI meal with GI values of 77 and 37, respectively. Blood counts of leukocytes, and neutrophils and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio were significantly lower in LGI than HGI at 90 min of exercise (P < 0.05). The plasma glucose concentrations were significantly higher in LGI than HGI between 15 min and 45 min of exercise. There were, however, no differences in plasma cortisol, growth hormone, and interleukin-6 concentrations between trials. Thus, the GI of a pre-exercise meal influences leukocyte trafficking and plasma glucose but has limited effects on circulating stress hormone and cytokine responses to exercise.