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  • Author: Wagner Luiz do Prado x
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Carla Caroliny de Almeida Santana, Breno Quintella Farah, Liane Beretta de Azevedo, James O. Hill, Thrudur Gunnarsdottir, João Paulo Botero, Edna Cristina do Prado and Wagner Luiz do Prado

Obesity has been associated with poor academic achievement, while cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) has been linked to academic success.

Purpose:

To investigate whether CRF is associated with academic performance in Brazilian students, independently of body mass index (BMI), fatness and socioeconomic status (SES).

Methods:

392 5th and 6th grade students (193 girls) (12.11 ± 0.75 years old) were evaluated in 2012. Skinfold thickness measures were performed, and students were classified according to BMI-percentile. CRF was estimated by a 20-meter shuttle run test, and academic achievement by standardized math and Portuguese tests. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between academic performance and CRF, adjusted for SES, skinfold thickness or BMI-percentile.

Results:

Among girls CRF was associated with higher academic achievement in math (β = 0.146;p = .003) and Portuguese (β = 0.129;p = .004) in crude and adjusted analyses. No significant association was found among boys. BMI was not associated with overall academic performance. There was a weak negative association between skinfold thickness and performance in mathematics in boys (β =- 0.030;p = .04), but not in girls.

Conclusion:

The results highlight the importance of maintaining high fitness levels in girls throughout adolescence a period commonly associated with reductions in physical activity levels and CRF.

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Humberto José Gomes Silva, Lars Bo Andersen, Mara Cristina Lofrano-Prado, Mauro V.G. Barros, Ismael Fortes Freitas Jr., James Hill and Wagner Luiz do Prado

Background:

It is unclear how different exercise intensities affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in obese adolescents. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of high-intensity (HIT) vs. low-intensity (LIT) aerobic training on CVD risk factors in obese adolescents.

Methods:

Forty-three obese adolescents (age: 15.7 ± 1.3 years, BMI: 34.3 ± 4.1kg/m2) participated this study either HIT (corresponding to ventilatory threshold I; N = 20) or LIT (20% below ventilatory threshold I; N = 23) for 12 weeks. All sessions were isocaloric (350 kcal). All participants received the same nutritional, psychological, and clinical counseling. Subjects were assessed in fatness, fitness, lipid profile, and glucose at baseline and after 12 weeks. The CVD risk factors assessed were waist circumference (WC), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), glucose, and fitness, which were single and clustered analyzed (z scores sum).

Results:

Body mass, Body Mass Index, fatness, and WC were improved (P < .001) in both groups. The sum of z scores (WC + TC + glucose-fitness-HDL) improved in both HIT (12 weeks = −2.16 SD; Cohen’s d = .45) and LIT (12 weeks = −2.13 SD; Cohen’s d = .60) without groups differences. Changes in fitness were associated with changes in WC (r = −.48; P = .003).

Conclusion:

HIT does not promote any additional improvements in CVD risk factors than LIT in obese adolescents.