Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author: Ying Liu x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Zhang Ying, Liu Dong Ning and Liu Xin

Background:

Seldom studies are about the relationship between built environment and physical activity, weight, and health outcome in meso- and microscales.

Methods:

1100 residents aged 46 to 80 were recruited from 80 neighborhoods of 13 selected communities of Shanghai, China. An analysis of the relationship between dependent variables (physical activity, Body Mass Index [BMI], overweight/obesity, weight, and health outcomes) and independent variables (involved a geographic-information-system-derived measure of built environment) was conducted with hierarchical linear models.

Results:

Street connectivity was positively associated with physical activity (P < .01). River proximity was inversely related with overweight/obesity (P = .0220). Parkland and square proximity have a significant relationship with physical activity (P = .0270, .0010), BMI (P = .0260, .0130), and overweight/obesity (P = .0020, .0470). Land-use mix was positively associated with physical activity (P < .01) and inversely associated with BMI (P = .0240) and overweight/obesity (P = .0440). Green and open spaces were positively related with BMI (P < .01) and health status (P < .01). For residential style, residents living in a village were more likely to have a lower BMI and overweight/obesity than those living in an urban old or newer residential building. The direct effect of square proximity is much stronger than the indirect effect on BMI through physical activity.

Conclusions:

The findings can help planners build more pedestrian-friendly communities. They are also useful for creating interventions that are sensitive to possible environmental barriers to physical activity in older adults.

Restricted access

Xiao Bao, Jie-Wen Tan, Ying Long, Howe Liu and Hui-Yu Liu

Objective: To study the effect of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) for dizziness. Design: A single-blind, randomized controlled trial. All participants were recruited from a rehabilitation department in an acute university-affiliated hospital. Intervention: Participants with dizziness were randomly assigned to 2 groups (IHT group and control group). The Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and Vertigo Visual Analog Scale were conducted at baseline, end of the fourth week. Results: Among 52 subjects, there were18 males and 34 females, ages 35 to 62 years old (mean [SD] = 46.9 [7.93]). Time length since onset ranged from 12 to 34 months (20.2 [7.15] mo). Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale scores, and attack frequencies of dizziness were improved after IHT intervention in the end of the fourth week. There were significant differences between the IHT group and the control group in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Vertigo Visual Analog Scale scores, and attack frequencies of dizziness at the end of the fourth week (P < .05). No adverse events occurred during the study. Conclusion: IHT could improve dizziness after intervention at the end of the fourth week. IHT could be the effective method for treating dizziness.

Restricted access

Timothy D. Heden, Ying Liu, Young-Min Park, Nathan C. Winn and Jill A. Kanaley

Background:

This study assessed if walking at a self-selected pace could improve postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations in obese adolescents consuming high-fructose (HF) or high-glucose (HG) diets.

Methods:

Seven obese male and female adolescents (18 ± 1 yr) performed 4, 15-day trials in a random order, including 1) HF-diet (50 g fructose/d added to normal diet) while being sedentary, 2) HG-diet (50 g glucose/d) while sedentary, 3) HF-diet with additional walking, and 4) HG-diet with additional walking. On the 15th day of each trial, the participants performed mixed meal testing in the laboratory in which they consumed three liquid shakes (either HF or HG) and during the HF and HG sedentary trials, the participants took < 4000 steps while in the laboratory but during the walking trials took ≥ 13,000 steps during testing.

Results:

Walking did not alter postprandial glucose concentrations. Although walking reduced insulin secretion by 34% and 25% during the HF- and HG-diet, respectively (P < .05), total insulin concentrations were only significantly reduced (P > .05) with walking during the HF trial, possibly because walking enhanced insulin clearance to a greater extent during the HF-diet.

Conclusions:

Walking reduces postprandial insulin secretion in obese adolescents consuming a high-fructose or high-glucose diet.

Restricted access

Peter S.W. Davies, Jian-Ying Feng, J. Anthony Crisp, Janice M.E. Day, Ann Laidlaw, Jidi Chen and Xiao-Peng Liu

The energy expenditure and hence energy requirements of 12 young Chinese gymnasts attending a specialized school in Beijing were assessed. Total energy expenditure was measured using the doubly labeled water technique and this, in conjunction with measures of basal metabolic rate (BMR), allows the calculation of a physical activity level (PAL). Mean PAL value for the gymnasts was 1.98, which is significantly different from published mean values found in nongymnast children of a similar age. This mean value is equivalent to very heavy levels of physical activity during the periods of training being undertaken. This is the first time that energy expenditure has been noninvasively measured in free-living young gymnasts. The data will be of use to sports scientists and nutritionists alike.

Open access

Yang Liu, Yan Tang, Zhen-Bo Cao, Pei-Jie Chen, Jia-Lin Zhang, Zheng Zhu, Jie Zhuang, Yang Yang and Yue-Ying Hu

Background:

Internationally comparable evidence is important to advocate for young people’s physical activity. The aim of this article is to present the inaugural Shanghai (China) Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.

Methods:

Since no national data are available, the working group developed the survey questionnaire and carried out the school surveys for students (n = 71,404), parents (n = 70,346), and school administrators and teachers (n = 1398). The grades of 9 report card indicators were assigned in accordance with the survey results against a defined benchmark: A is 81% to 100%; B is 61% to 80%; C is 41% to 60%, D is 21% to 40%; F is 0% to 20%.

Results:

The 9 indicators were graded as follows: Overall Physical Activity Levels (F), Organized Sport Participation (F), Active Play (D-), Active Transportation (C-), Sedentary Behavior (F), Family and Peers (B), School (B+), Community and the Built Environment (D+), and Government (D).

Conclusions:

Levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior were low and below the respective recommended guidelines. Interventions and policies at the community level should be encouraged to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. Future national surveys should be encouraged to strengthen Shanghai’s Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth.