Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Yoshio Nakamura x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Ai Shibata, Koichiro Oka, Yoshio Nakamura and Isao Muraoka

Background:

Although engaging in the recommended amount of physical activity provides disease-prevention benefits, few studies have examined the proportion and correlates of meeting the Japanese physical activity recommendation. This study investigated the prevalence and demographic correlates of attaining the recommended value on the Exercise and Physical Activity Reference for Health Promotion 2006.

Methods:

Data were analyzed for 5177 Japanese adults who took an Internet-based cross-sectional survey. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and 6 possible demographic correlates were obtained. Respondents were divided into 3 groups—recommended, insufficient, and inactive—according to their estimated weekly physical activity level. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used.

Results:

Overall, 26.6% of respondents were physically active according to the recommendation criterion. Gender, employment status, age, marital status, and educational level were statistically significant. In men, being employed and in women, being 30 to 39 years of age were negatively associated with the attainment of the recommendation. Being male, being a married woman, and having a college education or higher for women were positively correlated with the attainment of the recommendation.

Conclusions:

Different associations of demographic correlates with the physical activity recommendation for men and women were found, suggesting that gender-specific strategies for targeting the population or specific interventions might be more effective in promoting physical activity among Japanese adults.

Restricted access

Kazuhiro Harada, Ai Shibata, Euna Lee, Koichiro Oka and Yoshio Nakamura

Background:

Although several studies have examined associations of perceived benefits and barriers with physical activity, no studies have focused on them corresponding to strength-training recommendations for older adults. This study examined the associations among the perceived health benefits of strength training, perceived barriers to strength straining, and stages of change for strength-training behavior in older Japanese adults.

Methods:

This cross-sectional survey included a random sample of 1144 adults (60–74 years) from the city of Tokorozawa. Stage of change was the independent variable, with perceived health benefits (eg, strength training can reduce body pain) and perceived barriers (eg, facilities are needed for strength training) as dependent variables. Data were analyzed by analysis of covariance and Bonferroni’s multiple comparison.

Results:

After adjusting for demographic variables, the perceived health-benefit score for precontemplation was significantly lower than for the other four stages. The perceived barrier scores in the precontemplation and contemplation stages were significantly higher than those in the preparation and maintenance stages.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that information about the health benefits for older adults and about the recommended type of strength training might be useful for the development of strategies to promote strength training among older adults.

Restricted access

Kazuhiro Harada, Ai Shibata, Koichiro Oka and Yoshio Nakamura

This study aimed to examine the association of muscle-strengthening activity with knee and low back pain, falls, and health-related quality of life among Japanese older adults. A cross-sectional survey targeted 3,000 people. The response rate was 52% and 208 respondents did not meet the inclusion criteria. Therefore, 1,351 individuals were analyzed. Muscle-strengthening activity (exercise using equipment and body weight, lifestyle activities), knee and low back pain, falls over the past year, health-related quality of life (SF-8), and potential confounders were assessed. Individuals engaging in exercise using body weight and lifestyle activity (≥ 2 days/week) were more likely to have knee pain. Engaging in exercise using equipment and body weight was associated with higher scores of general health. These results indicate that exercise using equipment and body weight might have a positive effect on health-related quality of life, but muscle-strengthening activities are associated with knee pain in older people.

Restricted access

Kazuhiro Harada, Koichiro Oka, Ai Shibata, Kaori Ishii, Yoshio Nakamura, Shigeru Inoue and Teruichi Shimomitsu

The authors examined the relationship between strength-training behavior and perceived environment in older Japanese adults. An Internet-based survey was conducted of 293 adults age 68.2 ± 2.8 yr. The dependent variable was regular strength-training behavior. The IPAQ environment module, access to facilities for strength training, and home equipment for strength training were environmental factors. Logistic-regression analysis was employed. After demographic variables (gender, age, educational background, household income, body-mass index, self-rated health status, smoking habit, and residential area) were adjusted for, home equipment for strength training (OR = 2.14, 95% CI = 1.50–3.06), access to facilities for strength training (OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 1.32–4.85), and observing active people (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.06–4.58) were positively correlated with regular strength-training behavior. In conclusion, environmental factors associated with strength-training behavior were access to facilities for strength training, having home equipment for strength training, and observing active people.