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Tywan G. Martin, Jessica Wallace, Young Ik Suh, Kysha Harriell and Justin Tatman

The purpose of this study was to examine athletic training students’ media consumption to advance our understanding of the role the media play in reported incidences of sport-related concussion (SRC) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in American football and how media coverage of those injuries may potentially influence public perception. Participants who consumed more hours of television per day were more likely to disagree with the statements that reporting on SRC has helped to accurately educate the public, H(2) = 11.06, p = .01, and that reporting on CTE has helped to accurately educate the public, H(2) = 8.67, p = .01. Respondents who consumed more hours of Internet per day were more likely to disagree with the statements that accurate terminology is used to report SRC, H(2) = 7.78, p = .02, and that reporting of SRCs has helped to accurately educate the public, H(2) = 8.27, p = .02.

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Taesoo Ahn, Young Ik Suh, Jin Kyun Lee and Paul M. Pedersen

The current study sought to identify the effect of team identification on brand attitude and purchase intention in terms of team logo changes. Doubly Multivariate Analysis of repeated measures, 2 (logo change: original and redesigned logo) × 3 (team identification: high, moderate, and low), was conducted on attitude toward the brand and purchase intention of team-logoed merchandise. The results showed that there were significant differences between fans with high identification and fans with low identification. The findings of this study can be beneficial for both sport industry practitioners and marketing scholars by providing an understanding of brand attitude and purchase intention related to new redesigned logos based upon different levels of team identification.