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Fiona Chambers and Robin Gregg

This paper highlights the status of coaching and coach education policy and practice on the island of Ireland. The island of Ireland represents a unique setting as it comprises a hybrid jurisdiction of (a) the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and (b) the Republic of Ireland. A historical and sociopolitical backdrop provides insight into how key agencies develop coaching and coach education policy and practice in a highly complex dual environment. A five-step meta-synthesis process of data collection and analysis revealed key policy and practice issues on the island relating to (a) the coaching workforce and (b) coach education system.

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Göran Kenttä, Marte Bentzen, Kristen Dieffenbach and Peter Olusoga

High-performance (HP) coaching is a demanding profession that challenges mental health and sustainability in the profession ( Didymus, 2017 ). Coaches face constant pressure related to performance expectations, along with the perennial threat of negative consequences such as funding cuts and job

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Deborah L. Feltz, Teri J. Hepler, Nathan Roman and Craig Paiement

The Coaching Efficacy Scale (CES) measures beliefs coaches have to affect the learning and performance of their athletes. While previous research has provided support for the model of coaching efficacy and the CES as an adequate measure of the construct, these studies have used paid high-school and college coaches. It is possible that the factor structure of the CES may not replicate for volunteer youth sport coaches. The purpose of this study was to explore coaching efficacy sources used by volunteer youth sport coaches. In addition, the validity of the CES was examined, using a 5-point condensed rating scale, among volunteer youth sport coaches before exploring the sources. The study involved 492 volunteer youth sport coaches from various team sports. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the CES had an acceptable fit to the data. The sources of coaching efficacy were examined via multivariate multiple regression and canonical correlation. Results indicated that more confident coaches had more extensive playing and coaching backgrounds, felt their players improved more throughout the season, and perceived more support than did less confident coaches, particularly in regard to technique and game strategy efficacy.

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Vicki D. Schull and Lisa A. Kihl

more deeply embedded and persistent than any other arena ( Hovden, 2000 , 2010 ). The masculine context of sport teamed with dominant masculine leadership ideologies often results in gendered logic and beliefs that men are naturally better sport leaders and coaches, and recent research found the

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Paul G. Schempp and Sophie Woorons

Olympians pushing the limits of human performance, medical doctors discovering ways of fighting debilitating diseases, coaches finding fresh solutions to athlete development challenges—experts in every discipline make a difference in people’s daily lives. Experts are those who possess “the

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Ryszard Panfil, Marcin Krawczynski, Piotr Marek and Lukasz Panfil

The purpose of this paper is to describe the current status of coaching and coach education in Poland. Currently, the dynamics of legal rulers that govern the sport coaching market in Poland are dictated by several broader phenomena, such as the globalisation of sport culture, European integration, decentralisation of power and deregulation of the labour market that has been occurring over recent years. The coaching labour market, which is determined by various needs of institutions and individuals, points to appropriate forms and methods of education for coaches. This new situation allows us to specify coaching roles and respective competences that are adapted to the dynamic needs of the market. It also allows Polish sport associations and “Akademia Trenerska” (“Coaching Academy”) to actively and innovatively stimulate the sport coaching labour market in Poland.

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Fernando Santos, Martin Camiré, Dany J. MacDonald, Henrique Campos, Manuel Conceição and Ana Silva

skills development and transfer consisting of six levels, with the inherent premise that athletes “have a greater likelihood of experiencing positive development outcomes as coaches move up the continuum” (p. 3). Specifically, coaches who actively discuss and practice life skills development and transfer

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Jonathon Edwards, Diane Culver, Ross Leadbetter, Kate Kloos and Luke Potwarka

An understanding of the relationship between the key stakeholders such as sport organizations, coach developers (CDs), and coaches and their roles within a system is imperative for ensuring the effective delivery of key programs and activities. This is particularly the case in the delivery of a

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Marie Hedberg

The purpose of this article is to describe the status of coaching and coach education in Sweden. The Swedish Sport Movement can be traced to the distinctive cultural and political characteristics that exist in Sweden and in other Scandinavian countries. The typical Swedish coach has been described as a collectivist, having a high work ethic and believing strongly in the importance of the group (Birkinshaw & Crainer, 2002). They build their coaching on what are traditionally considered female values, have a high-risk tolerance and there is often a lack of hierarchy in the coach-athlete relationship. Most coaching is done on a voluntary basis and the different Sport federations design and deliver coach education. There is no standard or uniform coach education regarding content, structure and costs. In addition, the quality of coach education in Sweden has not been assessed. Although many coaches recognize the importance of learning from other coaches, research has found that coaches in Sweden are seldom prepared to reflect and to think critically (Fahlström, Glemne, Hageskog, Kenttä, & Linnér, 2013; Hedberg, 2014).

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Sergio J. Ibáñez, Javier García-Rubio, Antonio Antúnez and Sebastián Feu

The importance of generating scientific knowledge is growing daily. This demand is clearly evident in sport sciences focused on the agents involved in the sport process (players, coaches, doctors, managers, public, etc.). Scientific knowledge is disseminated in many different forums and academic