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Thomas M. Maden-Wilkinson, Jamie S. McPhee, David A. Jones and Hans Degens

To investigate reasons for the age-related reduction in physical function, we determined the relationships between muscle size, strength, and power with 6-min walk distance (6MWD) and timed up-and-go performance in 49 young (23 ± 3.1 years) and 66 healthy, mobile older adults (72 ± 5 years). While muscle mass, determined by DXA and MRI, did not correlate with performance in the older adults, power per body mass, determined from a countermovement jump, did correlate. The 40% lower jumping power observed in older adults (p < .05) was due to a lower take-off velocity, which explained 34% and 42% of the variance in 6MWD in older women and men, respectively (p < .01). The lower velocity was partly attributable to the higher body mass to maximal force ratio, but most was due to a lower intrinsic muscle speed. While changes in muscle function explain part of the age-related reduction in functional performance, ~60% of the deficit remains to be explained.

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Rienk M.A. van der Slikke, Daan J.J. Bregman, Monique A.M. Berger, Annemarie M.H. de Witte and Dirk-Jan (H.) E.J. Veeger

unobstructive way. 8 This method quantifies the wheelchair mobility performance, that is, the ability to maneuver the wheelchair. This measure of the wheelchair–athlete combination is one of the most important performance aspects 9 contributing to overall game performance as described by Byrnes et al. 10 In

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Margaret Delaney, Meghan Warren, Brian Kinslow, Hendrik de Heer and Kathleen Ganley

Health Promotion, 2008b ). Although it is known that a relationship exists between physical activity and disability, the current study aims to quantify this relationship using the U.S. guidelines and self-reported disability in mobility tasks, ADLs, and social participation. Therefore, the purpose of

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Andrew F. Clark, Joannah Campbell, Patricia Tucker, Piotr Wilk and Jason A. Gilliland

accessibility, including mobility options (ie, geographic and economic), spatial awareness (ie, geographic and information), and opportunity awareness (ie, information and economic). Figure 1 —Theoretical outline of the physical activity accessibility model. Information accessibility is defined as the amount

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Jieling Chen, Emily Joy Nicklett, Yaping He and Vivian W.Q. Lou

. However, the vast majority of studies examining correlates of physical activity have focused on patients with end-stage CKD; few studies looked at individuals who are not in end stage. As patients with earlier stage CKD may experience fewer complications, less symptom burden, less physical mobility

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Annette J. Raynor, Fiona Iredale, Robert Crowther, Jane White and Julie Dare

resistance training and balance programs on fall prevention (see, for example, Hauer et al., 2012 ; Hewitt, Goodall, Clemson, Henwood, & Refshauge, 2018 ; Hewitt, Refshauge, Goodall, Henwood, & Clemson, 2014 ; Jansen, Claßen, Wahl, & Hauer, 2015 ) and in promoting functional capacity and mobility ( Fien

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Konstantina Katsoulis, Liza Stathokostas and Catherine E. Amara

; however, some participants (10 studies, 11 training groups) had mild to moderate mobility limitations ( Bean et al., 2004 , 2009 ; Fielding et al., 2002 ; Henwood & Taaffe, 2005 ; Marsh et al., 2009 ; Reid et al., 2008 , 2015 ; Sayers, 2007 ; Sayers & Gibson, 2010 ; Webber & Porter, 2010

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Katie J. Thralls and Susan S. Levy

their dominant arm in the time allotted. Repetitions that were not counted included excessive arm swinging or failure to complete the full range of motion. Mobility/agility: This comprehensive function, combining lower body strength and gait quality, was measured with the 8-foot up and go (8ft UG

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Silvia Varela, José M. Cancela, Manuel Seijo-Martinez and Carlos Ayán

dysfunctions affect various domains, especially mental processing speed, attention, memory, and executive function ( Harada, Natelson, & Triebel, 2013 ). Aging-related phenotypic expressions include, among others, gait dysfunction and mobility limitations ( Blackwood, Shubert, Forgarty, & Chase, 2016 ). These

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Frances A. Kanach, Amy M. Pastva, Katherine S. Hall, Juliessa M. Pavon and Miriam C. Morey

( Kortebein et al., 2008 ; Puthucheary et al., 2013 ). Without a preventive intervention, hospital-associated deconditioning and disability has the potential to precipitate short- and long-term consequences including loss of mobility, independence, and quality of life. Additional negative outcomes may