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Bill I. Campbell, Danielle Aguilar, Laurin Conlin, Andres Vargas, Brad Jon Schoenfeld, Amey Corson, Chris Gai, Shiva Best, Elfego Galvan and Kaylee Couvillion

the same technician, whose calculated FFM test–retest reliability was intraclass correlation = .99; SEM  = 0.37 kg; minimal difference = 1.03 kg. Maximal strength testing took place approximately 24 hr after the body composition assessment. After completing a body mass warm-up, participants followed

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Manuel Terraza-Rebollo and Ernest Baiget

evaluate its effect on the dependent variables (serve velocity and accuracy) in order to determine its efficacy for using it as a performance enhancer. Subjects participated in 1 familiarization session, 1 test session (maximum strength test and anthropometric test), 1 control session, and 3 experimental

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Tomohiro Yasuda

Consequently, our results suggested that, for healthy young women, upper leg 50% girth measurement rather than handgrip strength test was a useful method for evaluating both knee extensor muscle strength and size. In the present study, a stepwise multiple regression analysis was applied to the predictor

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Sabrine N. Costa, Edgar R. Vieira and Paulo C. B. Bento

3 dynamometer (Biodex Medical Inc.) was used for all strength testing. Isokinetic dynamometers frequently are used to assess neuromuscular function because they provide detailed torque, velocity, and position data with high mechanical reliability ( Drouin, Valovich-mcleod, Shultz, Gansneder

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Matthew D. DeLang, Mehdi Rouissi, Nicola L. Bragazzi, Karim Chamari and Paul A. Salamh

benefit from quantifying between-limbs symmetry via maximal isokinetic strength testing of the hamstrings and quadriceps. In conjunction with desired strength outputs, these standards could be used to assure readiness to play. However, while this guideline of identifying between-limbs symmetry is

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Susan J. Leach, Joyce R. Maring and Ellen Costello

) was comprised of 33.3% females with a mean age of 73.8 (5.4) years. Baseline Characteristics No significant between-group differences were noted for the demographic variables or outcome measures at baseline (Table  1 ) except the ankle dorsiflexion strength test. The B&S group exhibited greater

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Curtis Kindel and John Challis

). On the day of strength testing all subjects had their hip, knee, and ankle joint ranges of motion measured by a licensed physical therapist, and then warmed-up on a recumbent stationary bike at a self-selected speed for 5 minutes. Strength curves were assessed for hip extension using a Biodex

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Gavriil G. Arsoniadis, Gregory C. Bogdanis, Gerasimos Terzis and Argyris G. Toubekis

). In the last preliminary session, 3 days following maximum strength testing, all swimmers performed 5 repetitions of 200 m (5 ×200 m) at intensities corresponding to 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, and 100% of the 200-m maximum speed, each repetition starting every 5 minutes and 30 seconds with a push off start

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Justin L. Rush, Lindsey K. Lepley, Steven Davi and Adam S. Lepley

assessment. Quadriceps Strength Testing and Volitional Activation Isometric strength was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer by collecting the participant’s maximal voluntary force of the quadriceps muscles. Participants were instructed to sit on the dynamometer and were positioned in 90° of trunk

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Raquel Aparicio-Ugarriza, Raquel Pedrero-Chamizo, María del Mar Bibiloni, Gonzalo Palacios, Antoni Sureda, Agustín Meléndez-Ortega, Josep Antoni Tur Marí and Marcela González-Gross

) Handgrip strength test by groups: males. Level set at P  < .05. Statistical analyses adjusted for age. (D) Chair stand test by groups: males. a Significant differences between inactive and high sedentary and active and low sedentary. b Significant differences between inactive and low sedentary and active and low