Search Results

You are looking at 91 - 100 of 299 items for :

  • "sustainability" x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
  • Physical Education and Coaching x
Clear All
Restricted access

Matthew Ellis, Mark Noon, Tony Myers and Neil Clarke

action of adenosine, which increases cell activity. 5 Direct antagonism of adenosine receptors may improve aerobic performance through enhanced excitation–contraction coupling through increased release of Ca 2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 6 Similarly, it can reduce pain perception and sustain

Restricted access

Thomas Reeve, Ralph Gordon, Paul B. Laursen, Jason K.W. Lee and Christopher J. Tyler

the present study was only 38.3°C (0.4°C). Other high-intensity STHA studies reported similar thermal impulses and also failed to achieve a sustained elevation in body core temperature ≥38.5°C resulting in minimal physiological adaptations. 9 – 11 In combination, these data suggest that short

Restricted access

Eva Piatrikova, Ana C. Sousa, Javier T. Gonzalez and Sean Williams

The critical speed (CS) model describes the capacity of an individual to sustain particular work rates as a function of time, via the demarcation of 2 physiological parameters; CS and the curvature constant ( D ′). 1 – 5 The CS represents the highest speed that can be sustained for an extended

Restricted access

Robert H. Mann, Craig A. Williams, Bryan C. Clift and Alan R. Barker

calibrated automatic analyzer (YSI 2300; Yellow Springs Instruments, Yellow Springs, OH) in duplicate and averaged for subsequent analysis. LT and LTP were visually obtained by plotting blood lactate against running velocity and were approved by 2 independent reviewers. LT was accepted as the first sustained

Restricted access

Bettina Karsten, Jonathan Baker, Fernando Naclerio, Andreas Klose, Antonino Bianco and Alfred Nimmerichter

Critical power (CP) is defined as the highest sustainable rate of aerobic metabolism without a continuous loss of homeostasis. 1 It separates power-output (PO) intensities, for which exercise tolerance is predictable (PO > CP), from those of longer sustainable durations (PO < CP). The second

Restricted access

Joel Garrett, Stuart R. Graham, Roger G. Eston, Darren J. Burgess, Lachlan J. Garrett, John Jakeman and Kevin Norton

sustainment of performance output, while also minimizing excessive muscle damage. Along with NMF having an effect on the ability to sprint, decreases were observed within the mediolateral vector (PL1D side ) and anteroposterior vector (PL1D fwd ). This may mean that either directly, or due to modifications in

Restricted access

Simon A. Rogers, Chris S. Whatman, Simon N. Pearson and Andrew E. Kilding

Successful middle-distance (MD) running in distances from 800 m to 5000 m requires both rapid and economical movements. Athletes must sustain high running velocities at and above maximal aerobic speeds, 1 with sprint performance in the final lap of 1500-m races often determining medalists on the

Restricted access

Alan Chorley, Richard P. Bott, Simon Marwood and Kevin L. Lamb

is derived predominantly from sustainable aerobic pathways, 4 , 5 while work above CP requires a greater anaerobic contribution, drawing on a finite capacity of work known as W ′. The precise physiological underpinnings of W ′ remain elusive; initially thought to be a finite amount of energy drawn

Restricted access

Erin Calaine Inglis, Danilo Iannetta, Louis Passfield and Juan M. Murias

Identifying the critical intensity of exercise is a crucial aspect for predicting performance, prescribing exercise training, and evaluating the effectiveness of training interventions. 1 , 2 This critical intensity is thought to represent the upper boundary of sustainable performance (ie

Restricted access

Ana B. Peinado, Nuria Romero-Parra, Miguel A. Rojo-Tirado, Rocío Cupeiro, Javier Butragueño, Eliane A. Castro, Francisco J. Calderón and Pedro J. Benito

influenced by several limitations such as aerodynamic drag, rolling resistance, cyclist mass, hill gradient, gear ratio, or total distance. 10 , 13 Power output and cadence during uphill segments of the Tour de France have been described. 14 During ascents, cyclists have to sustain a mean power output of