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Deborah Hebling Spinoso, Nise Ribeiro Marques, Dain Patrick LaRoche, Camilla Zamfollini Hallal, Aline Harumi Karuka, Fernanda Cristina Milanezi and Mauro Gonçalves

; Vestergaard et al., 2009 ). Hortobagyi et al. ( 2003 ) conducted a seminal study of FD in older adults that compared peak knee joint torques during stair ascent, descent, and chair rise with maximal isometric knee extensor strength obtained from a leg press exercise. The results indicated that whereas young

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Michelle A. Sandrey, Cody Lancellotti and Cory Hester

multitude of problems through the kinetic chain from the plantar surface of the foot up to the knee. 8 By using forms of myofascial release (MFR) such as foam rolling (FR), and instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) to release soft tissue restrictions and increase ROM, this will ideally allow

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Liam Anderson, Graeme L. Close, Matt Konopinski, David Rydings, Jordan Milsom, Catherine Hambly, John Roger Speakman, Barry Drust and James P. Morton

sometimes only partly mobile or completely immobile at the knee joint ( Grant, 2013 ). This severely restricts the use of the muscle groups in the lower limbs and results in a period of muscle disuse. Under such circumstances, there is a progressive loss of fat-free mass (FFM; Wall et al., 2013 ), a

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Britton W. Brewer, Allen E. Cornelius, Judy L. Van Raalte and Howard Tennen

assess pain, negative mood, knee symptoms and functioning, and adversarial growth. An open response format was used to assess the main rehabilitation goal of participants. Ratings of the average amount of pain that participants experienced on a given day were given on a numerical rating scale (NRS) that

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Maria K. Talarico, Robert C. Lynall, Timothy C. Mauntel, Erin B. Wasserman, Darin A. Padua and Jason P. Mihalik

the task to identify possible indicators for dysfunction or injury. 2 Observational deficits in dynamic postural control 7 , 8 and unfavorable lower extremity kinematics, such as greater medial knee displacement 3 , 9 – 11 and decreased ankle dorsiflexion, 12 of pathological populations while

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Alexandre H. Nowotny, Mariane Guizeline Calderon, Bruno Mazziotti O. Alves, Marcio R. de Oliveira, Rodrigo A. de Carvalho Andraus, Andreo F. Aguiar, Cesar F. Amorim, Guillaume Leonard and Rubens A. da Silva

, which is considered a more challenging task to assess postural control in athletes with and without CLBP. In fact, the one-legged stance with knee extension has been examined in previous studies, including those athletes with CLBP. 7 , 14 , 24 – 27 However, knee extension constitutes a locking

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Roger J. Paxton, Jeri E. Forster, Matthew J. Miller, Kristine L. Gerron, Jennifer E. Stevens-Lapsley and Cory L. Christiansen

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of chronic disability in the United States ( Dillon, Rasch, Gu, & Hirsch, 2006 ). To alleviate OA-related knee pain, more than 700,000 total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) are performed annually ( Kurtz, Ong, Lau, Mowat, & Halpern, 2007 ), with more

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Kerry E. Costello, Janie L. Astephen Wilson, William D. Stanish, Nathan Urquhart and Cheryl L. Hubley-Kozey

Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is estimated to affect approximately 250 million people worldwide, 1 and OA rates continue to rise, 2 , 3 presenting a significant health care burden. The typical model of care consists of pharmacological symptom management until end-stage disease, when total knee

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Nobuaki Tottori, Tadashi Suga, Yuto Miyake, Ryo Tsuchikane, Mitsuo Otsuka, Akinori Nagano, Satoshi Fujita and Tadao Isaka

Superior sprint performance is achieved through the generation of large moments by the muscles crossing the hip, knee, and ankle joints ( 29 ). The magnitudes of these moments are primarily determined by agonist muscle size ( 2 , 11 , 12 , 20 , 32 ). In fact, trunk and lower limb muscles are larger

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Tina L. Claiborne, Charles W. Armstrong, Varsha Gandhi and Danny M. Pincivero

The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hip and knee strength, and valgus knee motion during a single leg squat. Thirty healthy adults (15 men, 15 women) stood on their preferred foot, squatted to approximately 60 deg of knee flexion, and returned to the standing position. Frontal plane knee motion was evaluated using 3-D motion analysis. During Session 2, isokinetic (60 deg/sec) concentric and eccentric hip (abduction/adduction, flexion/extension, and internal/external rotation) and knee (flexion/extension) strength was evaluated. The results demonstrated that hip abduction (r 2 = 0.13), knee flexion (r 2 = 0.18), and knee extension (r 2 = 0.14) peak torque were significant predictors of frontal plane knee motion. Significant negative correlations showed that individuals with greater hip abduction (r = –0.37), knee flexion (r = –0.43), and knee extension (r = –0.37) peak torque exhibited less motion toward the valgus direction. Men exhibited significantly greater absolute peak torque for all motions, excluding eccentric internal rotation. When normalized to body mass, men demonstrated significantly greater strength than women for concentric hip adduction and flexion, knee flexion and extension, and eccentric hip extension. The major findings demonstrate a significant role of hip muscle strength in the control of frontal plane knee motion.