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Liam Anderson, Graeme L. Close, Matt Konopinski, David Rydings, Jordan Milsom, Catherine Hambly, John Roger Speakman, Barry Drust and James P. Morton

) – – – – – – 0 0 ± 0 Note . LBW = lean body mass. Quantification of Daily Energy Intake, Distribution, and Energy Expenditure During the Weekly Microcycle On the basis of a reduced daily loading pattern when compared with normal training, during Weeks 1–6, the player was advised to adhere to a reduced

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Daniel Arvidsson, Elias Johannesson, Lars Bo Andersen, Magnus Karlsson, Per Wollmer, Ola Thorsson and Magnus Dencker

present study, the children with more body fat were neither taller nor had more lean body mass than children with less body fat (data not shown). Therefore, body size may not explain differences in serum BDNF and NGF herein. Instead, the relationships observed (the mediator analysis) may reflect the

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J. Luke Pryor, Brittany Christensen, Catherine G. R. Jackson and Stephanie Moore-Reed

Despite the well-known health benefits associated with regular exercise (increased lean body mass and musculoskeletal health and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and premature mortality, among other benefits), 3 , 4 less than 10% to 20% of adults in the United States participate in sufficient

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Ronald J. Maughan, Louise M. Burke, Jiri Dvorak, D. Enette Larson-Meyer, Peter Peeling, Stuart M. Phillips, Eric S. Rawson, Neil P. Walsh, Ina Garthe, Hans Geyer, Romain Meeusen, Luc van Loon, Susan M. Shirreffs, Lawrence L. Spriet, Mark Stuart, Alan Vernec, Kevin Currell, Vidya M. Ali, Richard G.M. Budgett, Arne Ljungqvist, Margo Mountjoy, Yannis Pitsiladis, Torbjørn Soligard, Uğur Erdener and Lars Engebretsen

assist in training harder, gaining lean body mass, or maintaining lean mass during periods of immobilization after injury ( Branch, 2003 ; Gualano et al., 2012 ; Heaton et al., 2017 ). Decisions on supplement use therefore need to consider both the context of use and the specific protocol employed

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Panagiota Klentrou, Kirina Angrish, Nafisa Awadia, Nigel Kurgan, Rozalia Kouvelioti and Bareket Falk

10.2 (0.4) 10.5 (0.4) .23 Height, cm 142.6 (2.0) 146.5 (3.3) .17 Body mass, kg 34.4 (1.5) 38.4 (2.8) .14 Body mass index, kg·m −2 16.9 (0.6) 17.6 (0.5) .34 Body fat, % 12.0 (1.7) 15.0 (2.4) .39 Lean body mass, kg 30.2 (1.2) 26.2 (4.0)* .03 Age from peak height velocity, y −2.9 (0.2) −0.9 (0.4)* .03

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Samuel G. Wittekind, Nicholas M. Edwards, Philip R. Khoury, Connie E. McCoy, Lawrence M. Dolan, Thomas R. Kimball and Elaine M. Urbina

type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were matched by age, sex, and race to lean [body mass index (BMI) < 85th percentile] and obese (BMI > 95th percentile) control subjects proven nondiabetic by oral glucose tolerance test as part of a study of CV aging. 12 Subjects with valid exposure and outcome data

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Abby L. Cheng, John A. Merlo, Devyani Hunt, Ted Yemm, Robert H. Brophy and Heidi Prather

female youth ice hockey athletes who had reached menarche compared with those who had not, with an incidence rate ratio of 4.1 (95% CI, 1.0–16.8). These findings are notable because although BMI is not an ideal measure of fat versus lean body mass, body composition is modifiable and further investigation

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Thomas Haugen, Jørgen Danielsen, Leif Olav Alnes, David McGhie, Øyvind Sandbakk and Gertjan Ettema

body mass: 70.4 [4.8] kg, fat mass: 9.7% [1.4%], and 100-m personal best: 10.86 [0.22] s) voluntarily signed up for this study. The athletes had performed sprint training for 9 (4) years. All athletes were healthy and free of injuries at the time of testing. The Norwegian Data Protection Authority

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Stephanie A. Hooker, Laura B. Oswald, Kathryn J. Reid and Kelly G. Baron

, high variability) is related to a leaner body composition compared with no activity. This supports the recommendation that doing some physical activity is better than doing no physical activity for maintaining a lean body mass. This study also found that greater average caloric intake was associated with greater

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Kim Beals, Katherine A. Perlsweig, John E. Haubenstriker, Mita Lovalekar, Chris P. Beck, Darcie L. Yount, Matthew E. Darnell, Katelyn Allison and Bradley C. Nindl

essential amino acids throughout the day can help maintain lean body mass and muscle strength during periods of suboptimal caloric intake ( Pasiakos et al., 2013 ; Phillips, 2013 ; Rodriguez, 2013 ). Students consumed a mean fat intake of 1.6 ± 0.4 g·kg −1 ·day −1 (42% ± 5.5% total calories) (RC) and 1