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Mohamed Abdelmegeed, Everett Lohman, Noha Daher, June Kume and Hasan M. Syed

participants. A flow diagram according to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement 18 illustrates the progression of study participants through the trial (Figure  1 ). Figure 1 —Flowchart outlining the progression of participants in the clinical trial. DRF indicates distal radius fractures

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Pawel R. Golyski, Elizabeth M. Bell, Elizabeth M. Husson, Erik J. Wolf and Brad D. Hendershot

Abnormal joint mechanics are often associated with an elevated risk for joint pathology. During ambulation, increases in peak knee joint loads have been related to the severity or progression of existing joint degeneration 1 and, to some extent, its initiation. 2 Regarding the latter, noting that

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Richelle M. Williams, R. Curtis Bay and Tamara C. Valovich McLeod

use symptom checklists 8 and upwards of 80% 9 use symptom assessments as part of their evaluation. Symptom resolution is a primary factor in deciding when to begin the graded return-to-activity progression, 8 , 9 yet studies show that only 10% 8 to 13% 9 of clinicians use symptom checklists for

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Brian W. Wiese, Kevin Miller and Eduardo Godoy

play. The athlete had improved due to the resolution of the rotator cuff strain, but there was still suspicion of labral pathology from the initial traumatic injury due to the mechanism of injury as well as the signs, symptoms, and clinical evaluation. Table 1 Treatment and Rehabilitation Progression

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Christopher M. Saliba, Allison L. Clouthier, Scott C.E. Brandon, Michael J. Rainbow and Kevin J. Deluzio

The onset and progression of knee osteoarthritis have been attributed to abnormal loading of the knee joint. 1 – 3 Clinical interventions, both surgical and noninvasive, aim to reduce medial compartment knee loads. 4 – 6 Gait retraining is a noninvasive intervention in the treatment of

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Zakariya Nawasreh, David Logerstedt, Adam Marmon and Lynn Snyder-Mackler

between plate motions for both training conditions to allow for muscle relaxation. Additional rest of 30 seconds was provided between trials. The mechanical perturbation training consisted of 3 phases (early, middle, and late). Progression throughout both treatment programs was criterion based similar to

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Michiel Punt, Sjoerd M. Bruijn, Ingrid G. van de Port, Ilona J.M. de Rooij, Harriet Wittink and Jaap H. van Dieën

the obstacle. The crossing width of the obstacles ranged from 7 cm up to 49 cm in steps of 7 cm. The interval between presentation of obstacles ranged from 4 to 2 strides and traveled with the same speed as the treadmill speed, so similar to what can be expected in daily life. Progression of Training

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Leigh J. Allin, Maury A. Nussbaum and Michael L. Madigan

to resemble the reactive stepping response to slipping at heel strike while walking. Unlike UST, VST involved volitional stepping onto a known low-friction interface, with a systematic progression from easy to more difficult slip-like perturbations. Subjects were instructed to step onto the known low

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Yong Wook Kim, Na Young Kim, Won Hyuk Chang and Sang Chul Lee

identified during suspension with elastic bands, served as a starting point for training and further progression. Figure 1 —Sling exercise with elastic bands. (A) Curl-up with head elastic suspension (flexor challenge), (B) Side-lying bridge with elastic suspension (frontal plane challenge), (C) Birddog with

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Adam Jones, Chris Brogden, Richard Page, Ben Langley and Matt Greig

bowlers 19 and the efficacy in the progression of ankle rehabilitation drills 20 represent contemporary applications with a specific injury focus used to inform unit placement. The loading metric can be calculated in each axial plane, in vivo within the athletic context, 17 – 20 providing both richness