Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 5,222 items for :

  • "relationships" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Lee-Ann Sharp and Ken Hodge

The purpose of this study was to investigate the components necessary for the development of an effective applied sport psychology consulting relationship between a sport psychology consultant (SPC) and a coach. To address this purpose, two SPC-Coach consulting relationship case studies will be presented. Following purposeful sampling methods, members of two SPC-Coach consulting relationships (2 SPCs and 2 elite coaches) participated in individual interviews to discuss their perceptions of effective consulting relationships. Inductive \content analysis was conducted to search for common themes both within and across the two case studies (Weber, 1990). Three categories emerged with shared similarities between both case study relationships as important to the development of effective consulting relationships between SPCs and coaches; (a) SPC knowledge; (b) trust; and (c) friendship. In addition, two categories individual to each of the case study consulting relationships emerged; (d) SPC fitting in with team culture; and (e) flexibility.

Restricted access

Yu Kyoum Kim, Galen Trail and Yong Jae Ko

The importance of relationship quality in relationship marketing has been well documented; however, very little attention has been paid to the issues of relationship quality in sport consumer behavior contexts. We investigated the cognitive structure of relationship quality (RQ) constructs (Trust, Commitment, Intimacy, Identification, Reciprocity) by comparing a general-specific model to a hierarchical model. In addition we empirically tested the link between RQ and three sport consumer behavioral intentions: attendance, media consumption, and licensed merchandise consumption. The model comparison revealed that individual constructs reflected both the distinct aspects of the specific dimensions of relationship quality and the holistic nature of relationship quality, supporting a general-specific model. Results from the simultaneous equation model indicated that for sport consumers, relationship quality with the team explained 56% of the variance in intention to attend games, 75% of intention to consume sport media, and 66% of intention to purchase licensed merchandise.

Restricted access

Daniel Arvidsson, Elias Johannesson, Lars Bo Andersen, Magnus Karlsson, Per Wollmer, Ola Thorsson and Magnus Dencker

physical activity and body fat, and their relationship. Childhood is a period in life characterized by rapid development of the neural system supported by a physically active lifestyle. Few studies have investigated the relationship of physical activity with the expression of NGF and BDNF in children

Restricted access

Claudio M. Rocha

same direction and does not make assumptions about the direction (positive or negative) of legacy perceptions. The major problem with those previous studies resides in the fact that they have relied on cross-sectional data. Considering the long-term nature of the preparation phase, the relationship

Restricted access

Francis Farrelly

This paper provides a critical assessment of the sponsorship relationship by examining relationship-related causes of termination. Based on a comprehensive investigation of major sport organizations and their sponsors spanning four years, the findings reveal partners at cross-purposes due to changing perceptions of value, opportunity, and responsibility. Related problems involving strategic versus tactical intent, commitment asymmetry, and sponsorship capability gap are identified. The research develops our understanding of the interfirm dynamics of sport sponsorship relationships including how they should be managed to avoid termination. Recommendations to prevent sponsorship termination and improve relationship outcomes, and directions for future research are provided.

Restricted access

Albert J. Petitpas, Burt Giges and Steven J. Danish

The quality of the counseling relationship has proven to be the most significant factor in facilitating treatment adherence and positive counseling outcomes. The authors of the present article contend that the dynamics of the sport psychologist-athlete relationship are quite similar to those of counselor-client relationship. They offer suggestions for the training of sport and exercise psychology graduate students that borrow extensively from the research and training strategies used in counselor education. In particular, a possible interface between sport psychology and counseling psychology training and practice is suggested, a brief overview of research on the qualities of the counseling relationship is presented, and several training strategies are provided.

Restricted access

Alejandro Pérez-Castilla, Antonio Piepoli, Gabriel Garrido-Blanca, Gabriel Delgado-García, Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández and Amador García-Ramos

velocity. 5 – 7 A practical question that remains virtually unexplored is whether wearable wireless devices could predict a 1RM with an accuracy comparable with the most commonly used linear position and velocity transducers. Recent studies have recommended the individual load–velocity relationship for

Restricted access

Martin J. MacInnis, Aaron C.Q. Thomas and Stuart M. Phillips

considerable fatigue that could interrupt training. As one way to address these constraints, Allen and Coggan 7 suggested estimating FTP as 95% of the MPO achieved during a 20-minute TT. To our knowledge, this relationship has not been demonstrated in the literature; however, confirming that a shorter TT is

Restricted access

Rodrigo Antunes Lima, Lisbeth Runge Larsen, Anna Bugge and Lars Bo Andersen

evaluating the association between physical fitness and academic performance ( 3 , 18 ). In the review by Donnelly et al ( 3 ), all 3 longitudinal studies included, a positive relationship between physical fitness and academic performance was reported. However, Santana et al ( 18 ) only found positive

Restricted access

Lawrence R. Brawley, Albert V. Carron and W. Neil Widmeyer

Gross and Martin (1952), and Escovar and Sim (1974), proposed group resistance to disruption (GRD) as an alternative conception of cohesion, but the GRD/cohesion relationship has not been empirically examined. In Study 1, this relationship was examined using an extreme-groups design. It was a priori predicted that elite athletes perceiving high team cohesion would also perceive high GRD. The prediction was supported for three of four aspects of cohesion assessed by the Group Environment Questionnaire. Study 2 methodologically extended Study 1 and examined the GRD/cohesion relationship comparatively across physical activity groups. Elite sport, recreational sport, and fitness class groups were assessed. Participants extreme in GRD were predicted on the basis of their cohesion scores. Results indicated that the form and extent of the GRD/cohesion relationship was moderated by group type. In both studies, group task cohesion was positively related to GRD for all samples. The studies represent the first demonstration of this important but neglected relationship.