Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 502 items for :

  • "sustainability" x
  • Sport and Exercise Science/Kinesiology x
  • Psychology and Behavior in Sport/Exercise x
Clear All
Restricted access

Anthony Barnett, Ester Cerin and Tom Baranowski

Background:

A population level increase in physical activity (PA) is critical to reduce obesity in youth. Video games are highly popular and active video games (AVGs) have the potential to play a role in promoting youth PA.

Method:

Studies on AVG play energy expenditure (EE) and maintenance of play in youth were systematically identified in the published literature and assessed for quality and informational value.

Results:

Nine studies measuring AVG play EE were identified. The meta-analytic estimates of average METs across these studies were 3.1 (95% CI: 2.6, 3.6) to 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7, 3.7). No games elicited an average EE above the 6 MET threshold for vigorous EE. Observed differences between studies were likely due to the different types of games used, rather than age or gender. Four studies related to maintenance of play were identified. Most studies reported AV G use declined over time. Studies were of low-to-medium quality.

Conclusion:

AVGs are capable of generating EE in youth to attain PA guidelines. Few studies have assessed sustainability of AV G play, which appears to diminish after a short period of time for most players. Better-quality future research must address how AV G play could be maintained over longer periods of time.

Restricted access

Connie L. Tompkins, Timothy Flanagan, John Lavoie II and David W. Brock

Background:

Compared with structured/organized activities, unstructured, self-selected physical activity (PA) may be more appealing for children in particular obese (OB) children. We examined whether both healthy-weight (HW) and OB children would engage in moderate to vigorous intensity PA during an unstructured PA program and compared heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) between the children.

Methods:

Twenty-one children [9 OB (≥95th BMI percentile, 12 HW (5th – <85th), 8.6 ± 0.8 years; 9 males, 12 females] participated in before-school (7:30 AM to 8:15 AM) PA for 18 weeks, 3 consecutive days/week. Each child wore a Polar E600 HR monitor and was provided a vigorous, age-targeted heart rate (THR) of 70%.

Results:

Mean HR ≥ vigorous THR for all children in 65.3% of the sessions and exceeded moderate intensity in 100%. Over the 18-weeks, no significant difference was observed in the overall mean HR between the HW (171.4 ± 12.0) and OB (169.3 ± 13.0), however the OB reported significantly lower RPEs than the HW (16.9 ± 2.6 vs. 17.6 ± 1.5, respectively; P < .05).

Conclusions:

Both the HW and OB children consistently sustained PA of moderate and vigorous intensity. The current study provides insight regarding the physiological capabilities and perceptual responses of HW and OB children participating in PA programs.

Restricted access

Lena Fleig, Megan M. McAllister, Penny Brasher, Wendy L. Cook, Pierre Guy, Joseph H. Puyat, Karim M. Khan, Heather A. McKay and Maureen C. Ashe

Objectives:

To characterize patterns of sedentary behavior and physical activity in older adults recovering from hip fracture and to determine characteristics associated with activity.

Methods:

Community-dwelling, Canadian adults (65 years+) who sustained hip fracture wore an accelerometer at the waist for seven days and provided information on quality of life, falls self-efficacy, cognitive functioning, and mobility.

Results:

There were 53 older adults (mean age [SD] 79.5 [7.8] years) enrolled in the study; 49 had valid data and demonstrated high levels of sedentary time (median [p10, p90] 591.3 [482.2, 707.2] minutes/day), low levels of light activity (186.6 [72.6, 293.7]), and MVPA (2 [0.1, 27.6]), as well as few daily steps (2467.7 [617.1, 6820.4]). Regression analyses showed that age, gender, gait speed, and time since fracture were associated with outcomes.

Conclusions:

Older adults have long periods of sedentary time with minimal activity. Results are a call to action to encourage people to sit less and move more.

Restricted access

Glen Nielsen, Rachael Taylor, Sheila Williams and Jim Mann

Background:

To investigate whether the number of permanent playground facilities in schools influences objectively measured physical activity.

Methods:

Physical activity was measured using Actical accelerometers over 2 to 5 days in 417 children (5–12 years) from 7 schools. The number of permanent play facilities likely to encourage physical activity in individuals or groups of children (eg, adventure playgrounds, swings, trees, playground markings, courts, sandpits) were counted on 2 occasions in each school. The surface area of each playground (m2) was also measured.

Results:

The number of permanent play facilities in schools ranged from 14 to 35 and was positively associated with all measures of activity. For each additional play facility, average accelerometry counts were 3.8% (P < .001) higher at school and 2.7% (P < .001) higher overall. Each additional play facility was also associated with 2.3% (P = .001) or 4 minutes more moderate/vigorous activity during school hours and 3.4% (P < .001) more (9 minutes) over the course of the day. School playground area did not affect activity independent of the number of permanent play facilities. Findings were consistent across age and sex groups.

Conclusion:

Increasing the number of permanent play facilities at schools may offer a cost-effective and sustainable option for increasing physical activity in young children.

Restricted access

Activity and Sedentary Behavior on Cognitive Health in Older Adults David E. Vance * Virginia G. Wadley * Karlene K. Ball * Daniel L. Roenker * Matthew Rizzo * 7 2005 13 3 294 313 10.1123/japa.13.3.294 No Sustained Effect of Aerobic or Resistance Training on Insulin Sensitivity in Nonobese

Restricted access

75 10.1123/japa.7.1.62 Frontal Asymmetry, Dispositional Affect, and Physical Activity in Older Adults Eric E. Hall * Steven J. Petruzzello * 1 1999 7 1 76 90 10.1123/japa.7.1.76 Incidence and Determinants of Injuries Sustained by Older Women during a Walking Program A. Elizabeth Ready * Glen

Restricted access

.1123/jsep.35.4.408 Psychological Mechanisms Underlying Doping Attitudes in Sport: Motivation and Moral Disengagement Ken Hodge * * Elaine A. Hargreaves David Gerrard Chris Lonsdale 8 2013 35 4 419 432 10.1123/jsep.35.4.419 Research Note Acute Exercise Enhances Preschoolers’ Ability to Sustain

Restricted access

Original Research What Sustains Long-Term Adherence to Structured Physical Activity After a Cardiac Event? Antonia M. Martin * Catherine B. Woods * 4 2012 20 2 135 147 10.1123/japa.20.2.135 Research Determinants of Neighborhood Activity of Adults Age 70 and Over: A Mixed-Methods Study Afroditi

Restricted access

COMMENTARY 3 WINS Fitness: Sustainable, Affordable, and Scalable Fitness Program for the Next Generation Steven Loy * 16 4 241 242 10.1123/jpah.2019-0030 jpah.2019-0030 ORIGINAL RESEARCH Associations of the Built Environment With Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Ugandan Outpatients With

Restricted access

1 93 106 10.1123/jsep.2013-0100 Driving and Sustaining Culture Change in Olympic Sport Performance Teams: A First Exploration and Grounded Theory Andrew Cruickshank * Dave Collins * Sue Minten * 2 2014 36 1 107 120 10.1123/jsep.2013-0133 The Digest The Digest Christopher Shields Jennifer