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Patrick B. Wilson

Background:

Psoriasis confers risk for cardiometabolic disorders. Cardiorespiratory fitness is inversely associated with risk of cardiometabolic disorders in other populations, but limited data have been published assessing cardiorespiratory fitness among individuals with psoriasis. This investigation aimed to: 1) assess cardiorespiratory fitness among individuals with psoriasis in the general population; and 2) compare levels to individuals without psoriasis.

Methods:

A secondary data analysis from the 2003–2004 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey was performed. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with a treadmill test, while measures of psoriasis severity included rating of psoriasis as a life problem and body surface area involvement.

Results:

Twenty-six of 1093 participants reported a psoriasis diagnosis (population weighted prevalence 2.9%). Individuals with psoriasis had lower cardiorespiratory fitness compared with individuals without psoriasis (36.2 vs. 39.1 mL∙kg-1∙min-1, P = .009). No differences in self-reported or accelerometer physical activity were found by psoriasis diagnosis. Cardiorespiratory fitness was not significantly lower in those reporting high life impairment or body surface area involvement.

Conclusions:

Cardiorespiratory fitness may be lower in individuals with psoriasis and these differences may not be explained by self-reported disease severity measures or physical activity. Future studies should examine whether validated measures of psoriasis severity predict lower cardiorespiratory fitness.

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Rebecca E. Hasson, Kirsten E. Granados, David Xavier Marquez, Gary Bennett, Patty Freedson and Barry Braun

Background:

Racial differences in psychological determinants of exercise exist between non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) and non-Hispanic whites (whites). To date, no study has examined racial differences in the psychological responses during and after exercise. The objective of this study was to compare psychological outcomes of single exercise bouts in blacks and whites.

Methods:

On 3 separate occasions, sedentary black (n = 16) and white (n = 14) participants walked on a treadmill at 75%max HR for 75 minutes. Questionnaires assessing mood, state anxiety, and exercise task self-efficacy were administered before and after each exercise bout. In-task mood and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured every 5 minutes during exercise.

Results:

Exercise self-efficacy and psychological distress significantly improved in both blacks and whites. However during exercise blacks reported more positive in-task mood and lower RPE compared with whites.

Conclusions:

These data suggest that racial differences exist in psychological responses during exercise. Further research should confirm these findings in a larger, free-living population.

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Soyang Kwon, Trudy L. Burns and Kathleen Janz

Background:

This study aimed to examine combined and independent effects of cardiorespiratory fitness and fatness on cardiovascular risk factors among U.S. adolescents.

Methods:

Data from adolescents age 12 to 19 years participating in the NHANES 1999 to 2002 were used. Fitness level was determined by submaximal treadmill test and was dichotomized as ‘not fit’ or ‘fit’ according to the FITNESSGRAM. Fatness level was categorized as ‘not fat’ or ‘fat’ based on the CDC BMI growth charts. Gender-specific multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted to compare age-, race/ethnicity-, fatness-, and waist circumference-adjusted means of blood pressure, lipids, lipoproteins, C-peptide, insulin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels.

Results:

A total of 3202 adolescents (1629 boys) were included for data analysis. Among boys, total cholesterol, tri-glycerides, insulin, and CRP mean levels were significantly higher (P < .05) in the ‘not fit’ group than in the ‘fit’ group, after adjustment for fatness level and waist circumference. Among girls, the fatness level- and waist circumference-adjusted means of total cholesterol (P < .01) and LDL-C (P < .09) were higher in the ‘not fit’ than ‘fit’ groups.

Conclusion:

Cardiorespiratory fitness, independent of fatness, may have beneficial effects on lipid profiles among girls, and on lipid profiles, insulin metabolism, and inflammation levels among boys.

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Matthew T. Mahar, Gregory J. Welk, David A. Rowe, Dana J. Crotts and Kerry L. McIver

Background:

The purpose of this study was to develop and cross-validate a regression model to estimate VO2peak from PACER performance in 12- to 14-year-old males and females.

Methods:

A sample of 135 participants had VO2peak measured during a maximal treadmill test and completed the PACER 20-m shuttle run. The sample was randomly split into validation (n = 90) and cross-validation (n = 45) samples. The validation sample was used to develop the regression equation to estimate VO2peak from PACER laps, gender, and body mass.

Results:

The multiple correlation (R) was .66 and standard error of estimate (SEE) was 6.38 ml·kg−1·min−1. Accuracy of the model was confirmed on the cross-validation sample. The regression equation developed on the total sample was: VO2peak = 47.438 + (PACER*0.142) + (Gender[m=1, f=0]*5.134) − (body mass [kg]*0.197), R = .65, SEE = 6.38 ml·kg–1·min–1.

Conclusions:

The model developed in this study was more accurate than the Leger et al. model and allows easy conversion of PACER laps to VO2peak.

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Lynnette M. Jones, Debra L. Waters and Michael Legge

Background:

Walking is usually undertaken at a speed that coincides with the lowest metabolic cost. Aging however, alters the speed–cost relationship, as preferred walking speeds decrease and energy costs increase. It is unclear to what extent this relationship is affected when older women undertake walking as an exercise modality. The aim of this study was to compare the energetic cost of walking at a self-selected exercise pace for 30 min in older and younger women.

Methods:

The energetic cost of walking was assessed using the energy equivalent of oxygen consumption measured in 18 young (25 to 49 y) and 20 older (50 to 79 y) women who were asked to walk at their “normal” exercise pace on a motorized treadmill for 30 min.

Results:

The mass-specific net cost of walking (Cw) was 15% higher and self-selected walking speed was 23% lower in the older women than in the younger group. When speed was held constant, the Cw was 0.30 (J · .kg−1 · m−1) higher in the older women.

Conclusions:

Preferred exercise pace incurs a higher metabolic cost in older women and needs be taken into consideration when recommending walking as an exercise modality.

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Renee E. Magnan, Bethany M. Kwan, Joseph T. Ciccolo, Burke Gurney, Christine M. Mermier and Angela D. Bryan

Background:

Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), an assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness, is regularly used as the primary outcome in exercise interventions. Many criteria have been suggested for validating such tests—most commonly, a plateau in oxygen consumption. The current study investigated the proportion of inactive individuals who reached a plateau in oxygen uptake and who achieved a valid test as assessed by secondary criteria (RERmax ≥ 1.1; RPEmax ≥ 18; age predicted HRmax ±10bpm), and the correlates of a successful plateau or achievement of secondary criteria during a VO2max session.

Methods:

Participants (n = 240) were inactive individuals who completed VO2max assessments using an incremental treadmill test. We explored physical, behavioral, and motivational factors as predictors of meeting criteria for meeting a valid test.

Results:

Approximately 59% of the sample achieved plateau using absolute (increase of VO2 of 150ml O2 or less) and 37% achieved plateau using relative (increase of VO2 of 1.5ml/kg O2 or less) criteria. Being male, having a higher BMI, a greater waist-to-hip ratio, and increased self-efficacy were associated with lower odds of achieving an absolute plateau, whereas none of these factors predicted odds of achieving relative plateau.

Conclusion:

Findings raise questions about the validity of commonly used criteria with less active populations.

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Paul D. Loprinzi and Brandee Smith

Objective:

To use the most recent ActiGraph model (GT9X) to compare counts per minute (CPM) estimates between wrist-worn and waist-worn attachment sites.

Methods:

Participants completed 2 conditions (laboratory [N = 13] and free-living conditions [N = 9]), in which during both of these conditions they wore 2 ActiGraph GT9X accelerometers on their nondominant wrist (side-by-side) and 2 ActiGraph GT9X accelerometers on their right hip in line with the midaxillary line (side-by-side). During the laboratory visit, participants completed 5 treadmill-based trials all lasting 5 min: walk at 3 mph, 3.5 mph, 4 mph, and a jog at 6 mph and 6.5 mph. During the free-living setting, participants wore the monitors for 8 hours. Paired t test, Pearson correlation and Bland-Altman analyses were employed to evaluate agreement of CPM between the attachment sites.

Results:

Across all intensity levels and setting (laboratory and free-living), CPM were statistically significantly and substantively different between waist- and wrist-mounted accelerometry.

Conclusion:

Attachment site drastically influences CPM. As such, extreme caution should be exercised when comparing CPM estimates among studies employing different attachment site methodologies, particularly waist versus wrist.

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Marcos R. Kunzler, Emmanuel S. da Rocha, Maarten F. Bobbert, Jacques Duysens and Felipe P. Carpes

Background:

In negotiating stairs, low foot clearance increases the risk of tripping and a fall. Foot clearance may be related to physical fitness, which differs between active and sedentary participants, and be acutely affected by exercise. Impaired stair negotiation could be an acute response to exercise. Here we determined acute changes in foot clearances during stair walking in sedentary (n = 15) and physically active older adults (n = 15) after prolonged exercise.

Methods:

Kinematic data were acquired during negotiation with a 3-steps staircase while participants walked at preferred speed, before and after 30 min walking at preferred speed and using a treadmill. Foot clearances were compared before and after exercise and between the groups.

Results:

Sedentary older adults presented larger (0.5 cm for lead and 2 cm for trail leg) toe clearances in ascent, smaller (0.7 cm) heel clearance in the leading foot in descent, and larger (1 cm) heel clearance in the trailing foot in descent than physically active.

Conclusion:

Sedentary older adults negotiate stairs in a slightly different way than active older adults, and 30 min walking at preferred speed does not affect clearance in stair negotiation.

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Barbara E. Ainsworth, Robert G. McMurray and Susan K. Veazey

The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of two submaximal exercise tests, the Sitting-Chair Step Test (Smith & Gilligan. 1983) and the Modified Step Test (Amundsen, DeVahl, & Ellingham, 1989) to predict peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) in 28 adults ages 60 to 85 years. VO2 peak was measured by indirect calorimetry during a treadmill maximal graded exercise test (VO2 peak, range 11.6–31.1 ml · kg −l · min−1). In each of the submaximal tests, VO2 was predicted by plotting stage-by-stage submaximal heart rate (HR) and perceived exertion (RPE) data against VO2 for each stage and extrapolating the data to respective age-predicted maximal HR or RPE values. In the Sitting-Chair Step Test (n = 23), no significant differences were observed between measured and predicted VO2 peak values (p > .05). However, predicted VO2 peak values from the HR were 4.3 ml · kg−1 · min−1 higher than VO2 peak values predicted from the RPE data (p < .05). In the Modified Step Test (n = 22), no significant differences were observed between measured and predicted VO2 peak values (p > .05). Predictive accuracy was modest, explaining 49–78% of the variance in VO2 peak. These data suggest that the Sitting-Chair Step Test and the Modified Step Test have moderate validity in predicting VO2 peak in older men and women.

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David A. Rowe, David McMinn, Leslie Peacock, Arjan W. P. Buis, Rona Sutherland, Emma Henderson and Allan Hewitt

Background:

Walking cadence has shown promise for estimating walking intensity in healthy adults. Auditory cues have been shown to improve gait symmetry in populations with movement disorders. We investigated the walking cadence-energy expenditure relationship in unilateral transtibial amputees (TTAs), and the potential of music cues for regulating walking cadence and improving gait symmetry.

Methods:

Seventeen unilateral TTAs performed 2 5-min treadmill walking trials, followed by 2 5-min overground walking trials (self-regulated “brisk” intensity, and while attempting to match a moderate-tempo digital music cue).

Results:

Walking cadence significantly (P < .001) and accurately (R 2 = .55, SEE = 0.50 METs) predicted energy expenditure, and a cadence of 86 steps·min−1 was equivalent to a 3-MET intensity. Although most participants were able to match cadence to prescribed music tempo, gait symmetry was not improved during the music-guided condition, compared with the self-regulated condition.

Conclusions:

This is the first study to investigate the utility of walking cadence for monitoring and regulating walking intensity in adults with lower limb prosthesis. Cadence has similar or superior accuracy as an indicator of walking intensity in this population, compared with the general population, and adults with a unilateral TTA are capable of walking at moderate intensity and above for meaningful bouts of time.