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Melissa DiFabio, Lindsay V. Slater, Grant Norte, John Goetschius, Joseph M. Hart and Jay Hertel

a maximal vertical jump. Three successive trials were performed, recorded with video cameras set up in the frontal and sagittal planes as previously described. 27 Before the assessment, participants were instructed to practice until both the participant and clinician were comfortable with the test

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James A. Yaggie and Stephen J. Kinzey

Context:

Ankle bracing has been used for many years in an attempt to prevent lateral ligamentous injuries of the ankle by restricting joint range of motion (ROM).

Objective:

To examine the influence of ankle bracing on ROM and sport-related performance.

Design:

Repeated measures.

Setting:

Biomechanics laboratory.

Participants:

30 volunteers. None reported ankle trauma within 2 years preceding the study or had other orthopedic conditions that would have affected physical performance.

Intervention:

Three brace conditions (McDavid A101™, Perform-8™ Lateral Stabilizer) were assessed during performance of the vertical jump and shuttle run.

Main Outcome Measures:

shuttle-run time, vertical jump height, inversion, and plantar flexion ROM.

Results:

Both braces restricted plantar flexion and inversion ROM and caused no change in shuttle-run time or vertical jump height.

Conclusions:

Our results indicate that bracing the ankle joint increases external lateral support to the joint without significantly restricting functional ability.

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James L. Nuzzo, Michael J. Cavill, N. Travis Triplett and Jeffrey M. McBride

The primary purpose of this investigation was to provide a descriptive analysis of lower-body strength and vertical jump performance in overweight male (n = 8) and female (n = 13) adolescents. Maximal strength was tested in the leg press and isometric squat. Kinetic and kinematic variables were assessed in vertical jumps at various loads. When compared with females, males demonstrated significantly greater (p ≤ .05) absolute maximal strength in the leg press. However, when maximal strength was expressed relative to body mass, no significant difference was observed. There were no significant differences between males and females in vertical jump performance at body mass.

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Borja Muniz-Pardos, Alejandro Gómez-Bruton, Ángel Matute-Llorente, Alex González-Agüero, Alba Gómez-Cabello, José A. Casajús and Germán Vicente-Rodríguez

were performed, with the best performance recorded for further analyses. Finally, participants completed the CMJ test on a portable force platform (Kistler Type 9260AA; Kistler Instruments Ltd). Participants stood with both hands on their hips to isolate the lower-limb action and performed a vertical

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Martin Buchheit, Mathieu Lacome, Yannick Cholley and Ben Michael Simpson

replicated over the 2 weeks, with strength (Tuesday) and speed (Thursday) sessions monitored in the first week, and endurance (Wednesday) in the second week. Neuromuscular Performance Assessment Generic Testing Before and after each session, vertical jump performance (CMJ height, Optojump Next; Microgate

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Sean J. Maloney, Anthony N. Turner and Stuart Miller

It has previously been shown that a loaded warm-up may improve power performances. We examined the acute effects of loaded dynamic warm-up on change of direction speed (CODS), which had not been previously investigated. Eight elite badminton players participated in three sessions during which they performed vertical countermovement jump and CODS tests before and after undertaking the dynamic warm-up. The three warm-up conditions involved wearing a weighted vest (a) equivalent to 5% body mass, (b) equivalent to 10% body mass, and (c) a control where a weighted vest was not worn. Vertical jump and CODS performances were then tested at 15 seconds and 2, 4, and 6 minutes post warm-up. Vertical jump and CODS significantly improved following all warm-up conditions (P < .05). Post warm-up vertical jump performance was not different between conditions (P = .430). Post warm-up CODS was significantly faster following the 5% (P = .02) and 10% (P < .001) loaded conditions compared with the control condition. In addition, peak CODS test performances, independent of recovery time, were faster than the control condition following the 10% loaded condition (P = .012). In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that a loaded warm-up augmented CODS, but not vertical jump performance, in elite badminton players.

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Andrew G Jameson, Stephen J Kinzey and Jeffrey S Hallam

Context:

Cryotherapy is commonly used in the care of acute and chronic injuries. It decreases pain, reduces swelling, and causes vasoconstriction of blood vessels. Its detrimental effects on motor activity might predispose physically active individuals to further injury.

Objective:

To examine the effects of cryotherapy on vertical-ground-reaction-force (VGRF) during a 2-legged landing from a 2-legged targeted vertical jump.

Design:

2 × 4 MANOVA with repeated measures.

Setting:

Biomechanics laboratory.

Participants:

10 men, means: 22.40 ± 1.26 years, 76.01 ± 26.95 kg, 182.88 ± 6.88 cm.

Intervention:

VGRF during landing from a targeted vertical jump (90% of maximum) was measured before and after four 20-minute cryotherapy treatments.

Results:

There were no significant differences in VGRF as a result of cryotherapy.

Conclusion:

Under the constraints of this study there is no evidence that returning to activity immediately after cryotherapy predisposes an athlete to injury because of a change in VGRF.

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Andrew S. Cole, Megan E. Woodruff, Mary P. Horn and Anthony D. Mahon

Relationships between physiological parameters and 5-km running performance were examined in 15 male runners (17.3 ± 0.9 years). Running economy (RE) and blood lactate concentration ([BLa]) at 241.2 m/min, VO2max, velocity at VO2max (vVO2max), vertical jump height and muscle power, and isokinetic knee extension strength at 60°/sec and 240°/sec were measured. The participants’ best 5-km race time over the last month of the cross-country season (16.98 ± 0.76 min) was used in the analysis. The data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficients. Significant relationships to run time were observed for VO2max (r = -.53), RE (r = .55), and vVO2max (r = -.66), but not [BLa], isokinetic muscle torque, or vertical jump. Identifying the unique strength and power characteristics related to running performance in this age group is warranted.

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Maurice Mohr, Matthieu B. Trudeau, Sandro R. Nigg and Benno M. Nigg

Purpose:

To determine the effect of shoe mass on performance in basketball-specific movements and how this affects changes if an athlete is aware or not of the shoe’s mass relative to other shoes.

Methods:

In an experimental design, 22 male participants were assigned to 2 groups. In the “aware” group, differences in the mass of the shoes were disclosed, while participants in the other group were blinded to the mass of shoes. For both groups lateral shuffle-cut and vertical-jump performances were quantified in 3 different basketball-shoe conditions (light, 352 ± 18.4 g; medium, 510 ± 17 g; heavy, 637 ± 17.7 g). A mixed ANOVA compared mean shuffle-cut and vertical-jump performances across shoes and groups. For blinded participants, perceived shoeweight ratings were collected and compared across shoe conditions using a Friedman 2-way ANOVA.

Results:

In the aware group, performance in the light shoes was significantly increased by 2% (vertical jump 2%, P < .001; shuffle cut 2.1%, P < .001) compared with the heavy shoes. In the blind group, participants were unable to perceive the shoe-weight variation between conditions, and there were no significant differences in vertical-jump and shuffle-cut performance across shoes.

Conclusions:

Differences in performance of the aware participants were most likely due to psychological effects such as positive and negative expectancies toward the light and heavy shoes, respectively. These results underline the importance for coaches and shoe manufacturers to communicate the performance-enhancing benefits of products or other interventions to athletes to optimize their performance outcome.

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Luke W. Hogarth, Brendan J. Burkett and Mark R. McKean

Purpose:

To examine the neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue responses to consecutive tag football matches played on the same day and determine the relationship between fatigue and match running performance.

Methods:

Neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue responses of 15 national tag football players were assessed before and during the 2014 State of Origin tournament. Global positioning systems (GPS) provided data on players’ match running performance, and a vertical-jump test and subjective questionnaire were used to assess players’ neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue, respectively.

Results:

There were small to moderate reductions in the majority of match-running-performance variables over consecutive matches, including distance (ES = −0.81), high-speed-running (HSR) distance (ES = −0.51), HSR efforts (ES = −0.64), and maximal accelerations (ES = −0.76). Prematch vertical jump was initially below baseline values before the first match (ES = 0.68−0.88). There were no substantial reductions in vertical-jump performance from baseline values over consecutive matches, although there was a small decline from after match 2 to after match 3 (3.3%; ES = −0.45 ± 0.62). There were progressive reductions in perceived well-being scores after matches 1 (ES = −0.38), 2 (ES = −0.70), and 3 (ES = −1.14). There were small to moderate associations between changes in fatigue measures and match running performance.

Conclusions:

Perceptual fatigue accumulates over consecutive tag football matches, although there were only marginal increases in neuromuscular fatigue. However, both neuromuscular and perceptual fatigue measures were found to contribute to reduced match running performance in the final match.