Search Results

You are looking at 111 - 120 of 9,282 items for :

  • "activities" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Tiago V. Barreira, Stephanie T. Broyles, Catrine Tudor-Locke, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Mikael Fogelholm, Gang Hu, Rebecca Kuriyan, Estelle V. Lambert, Carol A. Maher, José A. Maia, Timothy Olds, Vincent Onywera, Olga L. Sarmiento, Martyn Standage, Mark S. Tremblay, Peter T. Katzmarzyk and for the ISCOLE Research Group

consequences with respect to lifestyle behaviors, such as decreases in physical activity 4 and increases in the consumption of “Western”-style diets. 5 For example, using cross-sectional data, it was previously reported that among children, obesity prevalence, body fat percentage, and body mass index z

Restricted access

Thomas A. Perks

Commonsense understandings of physical activity would have us believe that as we age, we become progressively less physically active perhaps due to a number of life factors, such as leaving school, starting or maintaining a career, becoming a parent, or declines in health. In addition, the

Restricted access

Jeremy A. Steeves, Catrine Tudor-Locke, Rachel A. Murphy, George A. King, Eugene C. Fitzhugh, David R. Bassett, Dane Van Domelen, John M. Schuna Jr and Tamara B. Harris

Regular participation in physical activity (PA) lowers the risk of many diseases, 1 – 3 while large amounts of sedentary time (4 or more hours of TV per day), specifically sitting, have been associated with increased risk for many negative health outcomes. 4 , 5 Considering 30% of US adults in

Restricted access

Tina Smith, Sue Reeves, Lewis G. Halsey, Jörg Huber and Jin Luo

decrease in physical activity has been shown to have an inverse relationship with body mass. 3 , 4 Furthermore, obese people who undertake more physical activity have been shown to be metabolically healthier than their less active counterparts. 5 , 6 It is still unclear as to the effects of being

Restricted access

Shannon S.C. Herrick and Lindsay R. Duncan

; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Kim, & Barkan, 2011 ; Institute of Medicine Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health, 2011 ). Many of the chronic diseases being diagnosed differentially across LGBTQ+ communities can be prevented or mitigated through regular engagement with physical activity. However

Restricted access

Gregory J. Welk

Accurate estimates of physical activity are needed to advance research in many areas of kinesiology, as well as for a range of public health applications. While considerable progress has been made in methods over the years, each stride forward seems to come with a few half-steps backward. The

Open access

E. Kipling Webster, Leah E. Robinson and Danielle D. Wadsworth

Physical activity in early childhood is a critical aspect of healthy development. 1 Evidence has shown that physical activity levels and sedentary behaviors track throughout childhood 2 ; therefore, integrating appropriate physical activity habits at an early age may promote and sustain future

Restricted access

Lia Grego Muniz de Araújo, Bruna Camilo Turi, Bruna Locci, Camila Angélica Asahi Mesquita, Natália Bonicontro Fonsati and Henrique Luiz Monteiro

arrival of new technological options replaced traditional activities involving physical effort, supporting the sedentary lifestyle. 3 , 4 The time spent in sedentary activities, such as television (TV), video games, computers, and cell phones, is considered a public health problem because of its

Restricted access

Zakkoyya H. Lewis, Kyriakos S. Markides, Kenneth J. Ottenbacher and Soham Al Snih

A minimum of 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity a week and muscle-strengthening exercises twice a week is the current public health guideline to maintain and improve health. 1 , 2 Strong evidence exists that shows a dose–response relationship between the volume of physical activity (PA) and

Restricted access

Florian Herbolsheimer, Stephanie Mosler, Richard Peter and the ActiFE Ulm Study Group

determinants of mortality showed that the effects of social isolation were comparable with those of smoking and even exceed other well-known risk factors for mortality ( Holt-Lunstad, Smith, & Layton, 2010 ). Physical activity might be one factor that mediates the relationship between social isolation and