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Neil Armstrong, Joanne Williams, John Balding, Peter Gentle and Brian Kirby

The peak oxygen uptake (VO2) of 199 boys and 164 girls (mean age 13.2±1.3 yrs) was examined in relation to their body fatness, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol level. Peak VO2 was significantly correlated with skinfold thickness in both sexes (range r = −0.41 to −0.56). When the common effects of skinfold thickness were removed, no significant relationships were observed between peak VO2 and either serum cholesterol or blood pressure. The habitual physical activity (HPA) of 92 boys and 132 girls (mean age 13.0+1.3 yrs) was examined in relation to their body fatness, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol. No significant relationships were observed. The results of this study indicate that although skinfold thickness is negatively related to peak VO2, favorable relationships between children’s peak VO2 or HPA and either blood pressure or serum cholesterol remain to be proven.

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Trent Stellingwerff, Ingvill Måkestad Bovim and Jamie Whitfield

 = phosphocreatine; PRO = protein; RFD = rate of force development; suppl. = supplementation; SV = stroke volume; VO 2 max = maximal oxygen consumption. Middle-distance race intensity is extreme, with 800- to 5,000-m races being at ∼95% to 130% of VO 2 max ( Duffield et al., 2005 ), or 75–85% of maximum sprint speed

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Twan ten Haaf, Selma van Staveren, Danilo Iannetta, Bart Roelands, Romain Meeusen, Maria F. Piacentini, Carl Foster, Leo Koenderman, Hein A.M. Daanen and Jos J. de Koning

index, 23.5 [2.1] kg/m 2 ; and VO 2max at baseline, 51.8 [6.3] mL/kg/min). Subjects were categorized in performance levels 1 (4%), 2 (57%), 3 (25%), and 4 (14%) according to VO 2max -based athlete classification norms. 10 , 11 Subjects gave written informed consent prior to the first measurements. The

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Espen Tønnessen, Thomas A. Haugen, Erlend Hem, Svein Leirstein and Stephen Seiler

Purpose:

To generate updated Olympic-medal benchmarks for V̇O2max in winter endurance disciplines, examine possible differences in V̇O2max between medalists and nonmedalists, and calculate gender difference in V̇O2max based on a homogeneous subset of world-leading endurance athletes.

Methods:

The authors identified 111 athletes who participated in winter Olympic Games/World Championships in the period 1990 to 2013. All identified athletes tested V̇O2max at the Norwegian Olympic Training Center within ±1 y of their championship performance. Testing procedures were consistent throughout the entire period.

Results:

For medal-winning athletes, the following relative V̇O2max values (mean:95% confidence intervals) for men/women were observed (mL · min–1 · kg–1): 84:87-81/72:77-68 for cross-country distance skiing, 78:81-75/68:73-64 for cross-country sprint skiing, 81:84-78/67:73-61 for biathlon, and 77:80-75 for Nordic combined (men only). Similar benchmarks for absolute V̇O2max (L/min) in male/female athletes are 6.4:6.1-6.7/4.3:4.1-4.5 for cross-country distance skiers, 6.3:5.8-6.8/4.0:3.7-4.3 for cross-country sprint skiers, 6.2:5.7-6.4/4.0:3.7-4.3 for biathletes, and 5.3:5.0-5.5 for Nordic combined (men only). The difference in relative V̇O2max between medalists and nonmedalists was large for Nordic combined, moderate for cross-country distance and biathlon, and small/trivial for the other disciplines. Corresponding differences in absolute V̇O2max were small/trivial for all disciplines. Male cross-country medalists achieve 15% higher relative V̇O2max than corresponding women.

Conclusions:

This study provides updated benchmark V̇O2max values for Olympic-medal-level performance in winter endurance disciplines and can serve as a guideline of the requirements for future elite athletes.

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Stephen A. Ingham, Jamie S. Pringle, Sarah L. Hardman, Barry W. Fudge and Victoria L. Richmond

Purpose:

This study examined parameters derived from both an incremental step-wise and a ramp-wise graded rowing exercise test in relation to rowing performance.

Methods:

Discontinuous step-wise incremental rowing to exhaustion established lactate threshold (LT), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2maxSTEP), and power associated with VO2max (W VO2max). A further continuous ramp-wise test was undertaken to derive ventilatory threshold (VT), maximum oxygen consumption (VO2maxRAMP), and maximum minute power (MMW). Results were compared with maximal 2000-m ergometer time-trial power.

Results:

The strongest correlation with 2000-m power was observed for MMW (r = .98, P < .001), followed by W VO2max (r = .96; P < .001). The difference between MMW and W VO2max compared with the mean of MMW/W VO2max showed a widening bias with a greater difference coincident with greater power. However, this bias was reduced when expressed as a ratio term and when a baseline VO2 was accounted for. There were no differences (P = .85) between measures of VO2maxSTEP and VO2maxRAMP; rather, the measures showed strong association (r = .97, P < .001, limits of agreement = −0.43 to 0.33 L/min). The power at LT and VT did not differ (P = .6), and a significant association was observed (r = .73, P = .001, limits of agreement = −54.3 to 20.2 W, SEE = 26.1).

Conclusions:

This study indicates that MMW demonstrates a strong association with ergometer rowing performance and thus may have potential as an influential monitoring tool for rowing athletes.

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Kim Beals, Katherine A. Perlsweig, John E. Haubenstriker, Mita Lovalekar, Chris P. Beck, Darcie L. Yount, Matthew E. Darnell, Katelyn Allison and Bradley C. Nindl

Participants A total of 10 male SQT students volunteered to participate in laboratory testing and observation during MWCW training (age = 23.3 ± 1.8 years, height = 182.3 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 83.6 ± 4.5 kg, body fat = 12.5% ± 3.4%, VO 2 max = 60.0 ± 6.8 ml·kg −1 ·min −1 , and heart rate (HR) max = 190.4 ± 8

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Jacinta M. Saldaris, Grant J. Landers and Brendan S. Lay

body mass 62.9 [7.8] kg, and VO 2peak 63.6 [4.4] mL·kg −1 ·min −1 ) participated in the study. Ethical approval was granted by the Human Research Ethics Office at the University of Western Australia (RA/4/1/8273). Informed written consent was obtained from all participants before their involvement in

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Neil Armstrong

In Volume 1 of Pediatric Exercise Science (PES), a paper by Fenster et al. (25) investigated the relationship between peak oxygen uptake (peak V̇O2) and physical activity (PA) in 6- to 8-year-old children. They used both questionnaires and large-scale integrated activity monitors (LSIs) to estimate daily PA and determined peak V̇O2 using an incremental treadmill test to volitional exhaustion. They concluded that peak V̇O2 correlated well with PA as measured by LSIs but commented that questionnaire data were only weakly and nonsignificantly associated with LSI and peak V̇O2 data. Peak V̇O2 and PA are the most researched and reported variables in the 25-year history of PES. Yet, the assessment and interpretation of young people’s aerobic fitness and PA remain problematic and any meaningful relationship between them during childhood and adolescence is shrouded with controversy. The present paper uses Fenster et al.’s (25) report as an indicator of where we were 25 years ago, outlines how far we have advanced since then, and suggests future directions of research in the study of aerobic fitness and PA.

In the first volume of PES, Fenster et al. (25) investigated the relationship between 6- to 8-year-old children’s peak oxygen uptake (peak V̇O2) and physical activity (PA). Five boys and 13 girls participated in the study and their data were pooled for analysis. Peak V̇O2 was determined during an incremental treadmill test to voluntary exhaustion and PA was estimated using both questionnaires and large-scale integrated activity monitors (LSIs). On the basis of a significant interclass correlation coefficient of r = .59 between peak V̇O2 and the log of LSI average counts per hour Fenster et al. (25) concluded that “aerobic capacity, as measured by peak V̇O2 correlated well with physical activity as measured by LSI” (p.134).

They also commented that questionnaire data were only weakly and nonsignificantly associated with LSI and peak V̇O2 data. Young people’s peak V̇O2 and PA are the most researched and reported variables in the 25-year history of PES and yet the assessment and interpretation of peak V̇O2 and PA and any meaningful relationship between them during growth and maturation are still shrouded with controversy. The present paper uses Fenster et al.’s (25) work as an indicator of our understanding of young people’s peak V̇O2 and PA in 1989, briefly reviews what we know in 2013, and suggests future directions of research.

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Christopher Byrne and Jason K.W. Lee

Declaration of Helsinki. A total of 24 of the 31 participants had complete TC and HR data sets and were included in this study (mean [SD]: age = 26 [3] y; body mass = 65.5 [6.5] kg; height = 1.72 [0.05] m; VO 2 peak = 59 [5] [51–68] mL·kg·min −1 ). Methodology At 4 weeks prior to the race, each individual

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Gustavo Monnerat, Alex S. Maior, Marcio Tannure, Lia K.F.C. Back and Caleb G.M. Santos

, VO 2 max, and recovery supported the possibility of genomic predictors affecting trainability. 7 – 11 However, few studies have examined the link between genetic factors within elite soccer players and their physiological and performance parameters. According to our hypothesis, using a complementary