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Matthew R. Nagy, Molly P. O’Sullivan, Shannon S. Block, Trevor R. Tooley, Leah E. Robinson, Natalie Colabianchi and Rebecca E. Hasson

Despite the known benefits of physical activity, less than 50% of children in the United States meet the national physical activity recommendations of 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. 1 Overweight/obese (OW/OB) children fare even worse with only 20%–40% meeting the

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Shannon S. C. Herrick and Lindsay R. Duncan

, than their heterosexual counterparts. 5 , 7 , 8 Many of these health concerns can be mitigated through physical activity participation; however, LGBTQ+ adults experience unique barriers to physical activity engagement, such as homophobia, exclusion, and discrimination. 9 A recent survey in the United

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Chris Hopkins

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a highly prevalent disease among older adults ( Lawrence et al., 2008 ) and one of the leading causes of functional loss and disability ( Cross et al., 2014 ). Physical activity has been deemed crucial to optimal health outcomes, which has led to federal recommendations for

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Rawan Hashem, Juan P. Rey-López, Mark Hamer, Anne McMunn, Peter H. Whincup, Christopher G. Owen, Alex Rowlands and Emmanuel Stamatakis

Lifestyle in modern industrialized societies is characterized by a pandemic of physical inactivity and the wide use of technology-based sedentary behaviors. For example, in a large survey, 80% of adolescents (13–15 y) were found to not meet physical activity (PA) recommendations [1 h/d of moderate

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Jennifer P. Agans, Oliver W.A. Wilson and Melissa Bopp

has been observed since at least the mid-1990s. 3 In addition, these low levels of physical activity (PA) while in college often predict continued decreases in PA with age 4 – 6 and may themselves represent decreases from high school PA levels. 7 Concurrently, students tend to gain weight when they

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Juliessa M. Pavon, Richard J. Sloane, Carl F. Pieper, Cathleen S. Colón-Emeric, David Gallagher, Harvey J. Cohen, Katherine S. Hall, Miriam C. Morey, Midori McCarty, Thomas L. Ortel and Susan N. Hastings

-Yaish, Tonkikh, & Sinoff, 2015 ). Some physician activity orders, such as “up ad lib” and “up with assist,” are meant to encourage out of bed activity, but it is unclear whether these translate to actual time out of bed. Brown et al. ( 2009 ), using body worn accelerometers to continuously monitor patient

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Deise J.A. Faleiro, Enaiane C. Menezes, Eduardo Capeletto, Felipe Fank, Rafaela M. Porto and Giovana Z. Mazo

Physical activity has been widely studied and discussed, but gaps exist in the knowledge about their association with urinary incontinence. With respect to physical activity, studies have shown that it acts in a bidirectional manner, exerting either a preventive or a aggravating effect on urinary

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Nicolas Farina, Laura J. Hughes, Amber Watts and Ruth G. Lowry

Measuring physical activity is complicated, with trade-offs between the different types of available measures in terms of accuracy, acceptability, and feasibility ( Prince et al., 2008 ; Sylvia, Bernstein, Hubbard, Keating, & Anderson, 2014 ). Physical activity questionnaires have a distinct place

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Jessica St Aubin, Jennifer Volberding and Jack Duffy

associated with faster full return to sport and school/work. ▸ There is moderate evidence to support the incorporation of light to moderate physical activity within 7 days after a concussion in order to decrease recovery time and symptoms. Clinical Scenario Concussions are a growing epidemic and these

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Johanna Popp, Nanna Notthoff and Lisa Marie Warner

The beneficial effect of physical activity on health applies to people of all age groups ( Kyu et al., 2016 ). Nevertheless, the number of people older than 65 years of age in Germany who achieve the recommended exercise amount of 2.5 hr/week is rather low, at only 26.6% of women and 33.5% of men