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Michael J. LaMonte, I-Min Lee, Eileen Rillamas-Sun, John Bellettiere, Kelly R. Evenson, David M. Buchner, Chongzhi Di, Cora E. Lewis, Dori E. Rosenberg, Marcia L. Stefanick and Andrea Z. LaCroix

measures are, overall and according to participant age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, and physical functioning level; and (3) whether associations with prevalence of poor health status is similar for questionnaire and device measures, after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Methods Study

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Christina A. Geithner, Claire E. Molenaar, Tommy Henriksson, Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund and Kajsa Gilenstam

considered in a few (multiple measurements: Geithner et al., 2006 ; body mass only: Ransdell & Murray, 2011 ; Ransdell, Murray, & Gao, 2013 ), and none of these considered chronological age, maturity status, or body size as contributors to RAEs. Understanding the maturity status of adult female athletes

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Mynor Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jeffrey S. Martin, David D. Pascoe, Michael D. Roberts and Danielle W. Wadsworth

. Recruitment occurred through local advertising, university websites, social media, and study flyers posted on public bulletin boards. Participants participated in this study if they were females between 19 and 55 years old, had a body mass index >30 kg/m 2 , were not involved in any structured physical

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Courteney L. Benjamin, William M. Adams, Ryan M. Curtis, Yasuki Sekiguchi, Gabrielle E.W. Giersch and Douglas J. Casa

[ M ] age = 19 years, standard deviation [ SD ] age = 1 year; M [ SD ] body mass = 58.8 [9.6] kg; M [ SD ] height = 168.4 [7.7] cm; M [ SD ] VO 2max  = 53.6 [5.6] mL·kg −1 ·min −1 ) participated in this study, which took place during the 2016 NCAA cross-country season (August–December) in the

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Miguel A. Sanchez-Lastra, Kyle J. Miller, Rodolfo I. Martínez-Lemos, Antón Giráldez and Carlos Ayán

to 66 billion per year in the United States and by £1.9 to 2 billion  per year in the United Kingdom by 2030. 5 Both conditions, as well as related diseases, are largely preventable. Overweight (also known as preobesity) and obesity are defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 and ≥30, respectively

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Mark A. Tully, Ilona I. McMullan, Nicole E. Blackburn, Jason J. Wilson, Laura Coll-Planas, Manuela Deidda, Paolo Caserotti, Dietrich Rothenbacher and on behalf of the SITLESS group

/female), marital status (single, married, widowed, or divorced), living arrangements (alone, spouse/partner, son/daughter, other relative, other family, or nonrelatives), employment status (employed or unemployed), body mass index (BMI; underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese), and education (can read

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Sergio Estrada-Tenorio, José A. Julián, Alberto Aibar, José Martín-Albo and Javier Zaragoza

of MVPA per day (group 1), 30 to 50 minutes of MVPA per day (group 2), 50 to 70 minutes of MVPA per day (group 3), 70 to 90 minutes of MVPA per day (group 4), and >90 minutes of MVPA per day (group 5). Covariates A series of potential confounders were included: socioeconomic status, body mass index

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Laura K. Fewell, Riley Nickols, Amanda Schlitzer Tierney and Cheri A. Levinson

Restrictive Food Intake Disorder; Rumination = Rumination Disorder; LOS = Length of Stay in days for the total number of days in either residential and/or partial hospitalization programming; admit BMI = Admission Body Mass Index. Procedures This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at

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Steven A. Hawkins, Robert A. Wiswell and E. Todd Schroeder

This study examined the relationships between high-intensity resistance exercise and bone mass in postmenopausal women and serum reproductive-hormone levels and bone-mass changes in response to resistance exercise. Women 45–65 years old were assigned to an exercise or a control group. They trained 3 times weekly for 18 weeks at 90,70, and 80% of their 1-RM. Groups were not different in age, height, body mass, muscle strength, or lean body mass. Initial muscle strength increased significantly in the training group. Total hip and intertrochanter bone-mineral density (BMD) increased in the training group. Estradiol, testosterone, osteocalcin, and CrossLaps concentration did not change in either group. Serum estradiol was significantly related to change in BMD at the hip, femoral neck, and intertrochanter, as well as change in lean mass. Results suggest that high-intensity resistance exercise can increase BMD of the hip and that serum estrogen concentrations might influence bone and muscle adaptations to resistance exercise in postmenopausal women.

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Taina Rantanen and Eino Heikkinen

The aim of this study was to examine alterations in maximal isometric strength of multiple muscle groups over 5 years and to compare strength changes between individuals who maintained a high level of physical activity and others who did not. As a part of the Evergreen Project, 20 men and 59 women participated in at least one strength test at the age of 80 and again 5 years later. Men displayed no decrease in lean body mass over the follow-up. and the only significant strength decrease was in elbow flexion strength. In women, both lean body mass and muscle strength decreased significantly (except trunk extension strength). Overall, those men and women who were considered to have maintained a high level of activity retained their strength at a higher level than the more sedentary participants. Older people should be encouraged to continue physically demanding activities to maintain muscle strength at an adequate level for independent living.