Search Results

You are looking at 121 - 130 of 396 items for :

  • "sedentary time" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jamie Lye Ching Ting, Swarup Mukherjee and Michael Chia Yong Hwa

Background:

Adolescents require at least 60 minutes of daily moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (PA) for optimum health benefits. Reduced active and increased sedentary time can adversely affect health independently. This study investigated the sedentary behavior and physical activity patterns of Singaporean adolescents.

Methods:

233 adolescents aged 13 to 15 years participated in the study. Accelerometry was used to assess the daily PA patterns for 3 weekdays and 2 weekend days consecutively. Height, weight, BMI, waist circumference and waist-hip ratio were determined as surrogate measures of health.

Results:

None of the participants achieved the recommended 60 minutes of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on all 5 days. Significantly more time was spent engaging in sedentary activity compared with MVPA on both weekdays and weekends. MVPA and sedentary time were positively associated on weekdays after controlling for gender (P < .001). Weekday MVPA was positively associated with waist circumference (P < .001) and waist-hip ratio (P < .001).

Conclusion:

Singaporean adolescents fall substantially short of meeting the daily PA recommendations. Separate strategies to promote PA may be necessary for adolescents of differing weight status and gender. Pragmatic rather than idealistic targets to promote PA need to be set based on population-specific baseline data.

Restricted access

Josef Mitáš, Ding Ding, Karel Frömel and Jacqueline Kerr

Background:

Post-communist countries have experienced rapid economic development and social changes, which have been accompanied by changes in health-related lifestyle behaviors, such as physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of domain-specific physical activity and total sedentary time with BMI among adults in the Czech Republic.

Methods:

We surveyed a nationally representative sample (n = 4097) of the Czech Republic in fall 2007 using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (long form). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine associations of physical activity, sedentary time and sociodemograhic characteristics with BMI.

Results:

Older age, lower educational attainment, and lower levels of leisure-time physical activity were associated with higher BMI. Compared with those living in large cities, men living in small towns and women living in small villages had higher BMI.

Conclusions:

This study has identified correlates of BMI in the Czech Republic. Although more evidence from longitudinal studies is needed, findings from the current study can inform interventions to prevent the rising obesity epidemic.

Restricted access

Cristiane Petra Miculis, Wagner De Campos and Margaret Cristina da Silva Boguszewski

Background:

The aim of this study was to correlate glycemic control (GC) and variables of physical activity levels (PAL) in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).

Methods:

Fifty children and adolescents with T1DM were selected. Personal and medical data for the patients were collected. Physical evaluations of body weight and sexual maturation were undertaken. Bouchard’s questionnaire was applied to evaluate PAL as well as for time spent on physical activities.

Results:

Sixty-four percent of the subjects were sexually mature. Differences were observed between females and males in insulin dose, duration of light physical activity, and sleeping time (P < .05). Ninety percent presented poor GC and 80% had a low PAL. Fasting blood glucose (FBG) was significantly correlated with PAL, with sedentary time, and with sleeping time. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was significantly correlated with sedentary time and sleeping time. Among the three groups of PAL (insufficient × moderate × active) there were differences in HbA1c (%), FBG (mg/dL), duration of disease (years), and insulin dose (UI/kg/day) (P < 0.001).

Conclusion:

GC was significantly correlated with PAL. Among the three groups of physical activity level, the most active group was seen to have the best GC.

Restricted access

Meghan K. Edwards and Paul D. Loprinzi

Objective:

Examine the independent association of sedentary behavior and cognitive function in older adults, as well as whether physical activity attenuates this potential association.

Methods:

Data from the 1999–2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used (N = 2472 adults 60 to 85 yrs). Sedentary behavior was subjectively assessed and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST) was employed to assess cognitive function.

Results:

Among an unadjusted and an adjusted model not accounting for physical activity, only 5+ hrs/day (vs. < 1 hr) of sedentary time was independently associated with lower DSST scores (β = –3.1; 95% CI: –5.8 to –0.4; P= .02). However, a fully adjusted model (adding in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity as a covariate) did not yield a statistically significant association between 5+ hrs/day of sedentary time and DSST scores (β = –2.5; 95% CI: –5.1 to 0.2; P = .07).

Conclusion:

Accumulated daily sedentary behavior of 5+ hrs is associated with lower cognitive function in an older adult population when physical activity is not taken into account. However, physical activity may account for 19% of the total association between sedentary behavior and cognitive function, thus attenuating the sedentary-cognitive function association. Efforts should be made to promote physical activity in the aging population.

Restricted access

Sami Yli-Piipari, Janne Santeri Kulmala, Timo Jaakkola, Harto Hakonen, Joseph Cole Fish and Tuija Tammelin

Background:

Schools are in a unique position to ensure that all students meet the current physical activity (PA) recommendations. This study aimed to examine 1st to 3rd grade elementary students’ accelerometer measured school day PA in the United States (U.S.) and Finland.

Methods:

The sample consisted of 200 students (107 girls, 93 boys; ages 6 to 8) and their school day PA was monitored with hip-worn ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers across a 5-day school week and the thresholds 100 and 2296 count per minute were used to separate sedentary time, light PA, and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA).

Results:

On an average school day, students were engaged in MVPA for 20.0 min in the U.S. and 24.1 min in Finland. Students’ school-day MVPA was 9 to 16 minutes higher during physical education (PE) days compared with non-PE days (U.S: 25.8 vs. 16.6 min/day; Finland: 36.3 vs. 20.1 min/day). Girls had less MVPA and more sedentary time compared with boys in both samples.

Conclusion:

This study highlights both the role of PE and other school day physical activities in meeting PA guidelines. Policy measures are needed to change the structure of the school day and enhance PA to ensure that students meet the PA recommendations.

Restricted access

Victoria Catenacci, Christopher Barrett, Lorraine Odgen, Ray Browning, Christine Adele Schaefer, James Hill and Holly Wyatt

Background:

The America on the Move (AOM) Family Intervention Program has been shown to prevent excess weight gain in overweight children. Providing intervention materials via the internet would have the potential to reach more families but may increase sedentary behavior. The purpose was to evaluate whether delivering the AOM Family Intervention via the internet versus printed workbook would have a similar impact on sedentary behaviors in children.

Methods:

131 children (age 8–12) were randomized to receive the AOM Family Intervention via the internet or workbook for 12 weeks. Changes in objectively measured sedentary time and moderate-to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as well as self-reported screen time were compared between groups.

Results:

There were no significant differences between groups in screen time, sedentary time, or MVPA at the end of the 12 week intervention. Families receiving the intervention via the internet were more likely to remain in the study (98% vs. 82%, P = .016).

Conclusions:

Using the internet to deliver the lifestyle intervention did not increase sedentary behavior in children. Attrition rates were lower when the program was delivered by internet versus via printed materials. These results provide support for using the internet to deliver healthy lifestyle programs for children.

Restricted access

Lena Fleig, Megan M. McAllister, Penny Brasher, Wendy L. Cook, Pierre Guy, Joseph H. Puyat, Karim M. Khan, Heather A. McKay and Maureen C. Ashe

Objectives:

To characterize patterns of sedentary behavior and physical activity in older adults recovering from hip fracture and to determine characteristics associated with activity.

Methods:

Community-dwelling, Canadian adults (65 years+) who sustained hip fracture wore an accelerometer at the waist for seven days and provided information on quality of life, falls self-efficacy, cognitive functioning, and mobility.

Results:

There were 53 older adults (mean age [SD] 79.5 [7.8] years) enrolled in the study; 49 had valid data and demonstrated high levels of sedentary time (median [p10, p90] 591.3 [482.2, 707.2] minutes/day), low levels of light activity (186.6 [72.6, 293.7]), and MVPA (2 [0.1, 27.6]), as well as few daily steps (2467.7 [617.1, 6820.4]). Regression analyses showed that age, gender, gait speed, and time since fracture were associated with outcomes.

Conclusions:

Older adults have long periods of sedentary time with minimal activity. Results are a call to action to encourage people to sit less and move more.

Restricted access

Daniel Arvidsson, Ulf Lindblad, Jan Sundquist, Kristina Sundquist, Leif Groop and Louise Bennet

Purpose:

To compare physical activity measures and their associations with insulin sensitivity, β-cell function and body mass index (BMI) between Iraqi immigrants and native Swedes.

Methods:

A cross-sectional study of 493 Iraqis (58% men) and 469 Swedes (54% men) aged 30 to 75 years living in the city of Malmö, Sweden. Accelerometry was used for physical activity measures (sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, moderate and vigorous physical activity, total counts). Insulin sensitivity index and oral disposal index were determined from an oral glucose tolerance test and BMI by body weight and height.

Results:

Iraqi men were less physically active than Swedish men, while the physical activity was more similar in the women. BMI was a strong predictor of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function and frequently associated with the physical activity measures. BMI modified the associations of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function with the physical activity measures to such extent that only VPA and total counts show direct associations with insulin sensitivity in addition to the indirect associations via BMI. Iraqi women demonstrated weaker associations compared with Swedish women.

Conclusions:

Physical activity and performed at vigorous intensity may be important mainly for the insulin sensitivity in Iraqi immigrants and native Swedes.

Restricted access

Alyson J. Littman, Christopher W. Forsberg and Edward J. Boyko

Background:

Military veterans provide a large and diverse population to examine the extent to which compulsory physical activity (PA) in early adulthood is associated with PA later in life.

Methods:

We assessed self-reported and objectively measured PA and sedentary time in the 900 veterans and 2036 nonveterans with valid data from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Analyses were adjusted for the complex survey design and age, race/ethnicity, education, marital status, and poverty.

Results:

Based on self-report, the proportion of veterans and nonveterans meeting PA Guidelines did not differ significantly (51.1% vs. 43.9%, P = .26). However, a greater proportion of veterans reported regular vigorous leisure-time activity (30.4% vs. 19.6%, P = .04) and muscle-strengthening activities (24.4 vs. 16.7, P = .051). Based on objective PA monitoring, activity levels between veterans and nonveterans also did not differ significantly, although mean counts and minutes per day were numerically greater in nonveterans. By self-report (P = .02) and PA monitors (P = .065), estimated sedentary time was greater in veterans than in demographically similar nonveterans.

Conclusions:

Veterans were no more likely than nonveterans to meet PA Guidelines, but may have been more likely to perform vigorous activities and conversely, to spend more time in sedentary activities.

Restricted access

Lise Crinière, Claire Lhommet, Agnès Caille, Bruno Giraudeau, Pierre Lecomte, Charles Couet, Jean-Michel Oppert and David Jacobi

Background:

Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary time are cornerstones in the management of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, there are few instruments available to measure physical activity in this population. We translated the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ-L) into French and studied its reproducibility and validity in patients with T2DM.

Methods:

Reproducibility was studied by 2 telephone administrations, 8 days apart. Concurrent validity was tested against pedometry for 7 days during habitual life.

Results:

One-hundred forty-three patients with T2DM were recruited (59% males; age: 60.9 ± 10.5 years; BMI: 31.2 ± 5.2 kg/m2; HbA1c: 7.4 ± 1.2%). Intraclass correlation coefficients (95% CI) for repeated administration (n = 126) were 0.74 (0.61−0.83) for total physical activity, 0.72 (0.57−0.82) for walking, and 0.65 (0.51−0.78) for sitting time. Total physical activity and walking (MET-min·week-1) correlated with daily steps (Spearman r = .24 and r = .23, respectively, P < .05). Sitting time (min·week-1) correlated negatively with daily steps in women (r = −0.33; P < .05).

Conclusion:

Our French version of the IPAQ-L appears reliable to assess habitual physical activity and sedentary time in patients with T2DM, confirming previous data in nonclinical populations.