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Shelby L. Francis, Ajay Singhvi, Eva Tsalikian, Michael J. Tansey and Kathleen F. Janz

Purpose:

Determining fitness is important when assessing adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Submaximal tests estimate fitness, but none have been validated in this population. This study cross-validates the Ebbeling and Nemeth equations to predict fitness (VO2max (ml/kg/min)) in adolescents with T1DM.

Methods:

Adolescents with T1DM (n = 20) completed a maximal treadmill test using indirect calorimetry. Participants completed one 4-min stage between 2.0 and 4.5 mph and 5% grade (Ebbeling/Nemeth protocol). Speed and grade were then increased until exhaustion. Predicted VO2max was calculated using the Ebbeling and Nemeth equations and compared with observed VO2max using paired t tests. Pearson correlation coefficients, 95% confidence intervals, coefficients of determination (R2), and total error (TE) were calculated.

Results:

The mean observed VO2max was 47.0 ml/kg/min (SD = 6.9); the Ebbeling and Nemeth mean predictions were 42.4 (SD = 9.4) and 43.5 ml/kg/min (SD = 6.9), respectively. Paired t tests resulted in statistically significant (p < .01) mean differences between observed and predicted VO2max for both predictions. The association between the Ebbeling prediction and observed VO2max was r = .90 (95% CI = 0.76, 0.96), R 2 = .81, and TE = 6.5 ml/kg/min. The association between the Nemeth prediction and observed VO2max was r = .81 (95% CI = 0.57, 0.92), R 2 = .66, and TE = 5.6 ml/kg/min.

Conclusion:

The Nemeth submaximal treadmill protocol provides a better estimate of fitness than the Ebbeling in adolescents with T1DM.

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Carrie M. Geremia, Kelli L. Cain, Terry L. Conway, James F. Sallis and Brian E. Saelens

them are lengthy, costly to use, or have rarely been validated for their ability to explain park use, PA, or other outcomes. 20 For example, the EAPRS instrument is a reliable and comprehensive measure of park features and quality. 17 EAPRS has been used to examine whether the number of park features

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Heontae Kim and Minsoo Kang

battery life of the camera is dependent on the image capture rate, which can be up to 360 images per hour. Figure  2 offers samples of photos taken using the device. Validation of the Autographer as a criterion measure suggests that the absolute mean difference between the starting and ending points of

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Antonio Dello Iacono, Stephanie Valentin, Mark Sanderson and Israel Halperin

, et al . Validity of an isometric midthigh pull dynamometer in male youth athletes . J Strength Cond Res . 2018 ; 32 ( 2 ): 490 – 493 . PubMed ID: 29189578 29189578 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002324 14. Urquhart M , Bishop C , Turner AN . Validation of a crane scale for the assessment of

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Wei-Ting Hsu and Min Pan

that the measures of the model were appropriate and that the global teacher RISE support construct was supported. The hierarchical structure of the TRSS is shown in Figure  1 . Figure 1 —Validated hierarchical structure of teacher RISE support. RISE = relation-inferred self-efficacy. Study 3 The

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Daniel Milton, Paul R. Appleton, Anna Bryant and Joan L. Duda

derived from scales based purely within AGT. Thus, it is possible that the SDT-based climate dimensions are not accurately defined nor sufficiently captured in the MCPES. Recently, Appleton et al. ( 2016 ) adopted Duda’s framework to inform the development and initial validation of the EDMCQ, a scale that

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Tatiane Piucco, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Rogério Soares, Juan M. Murias and Guillaume Y. Millet

J Sports Med . 2007 ; 28 : 823 – 828 . doi:10.1055/s-2007-964986 10.1055/s-2007-964986 17534782 25. Petrella NJ , Montelpare WJ , Nystrom M , Plyley M , Faught BE . Validation of the FAST skating protocol to predict aerobic power in ice hockey players . Appl Physiol Nutr Metab

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Paula Louise Hooper, Nicholas Middleton, Matthew Knuiman and Billie Giles-Corti

Background:

There is increasing focus on the influence of neighborhood destinations on a variety of health behaviors. Commercial databases, integrated with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), are popular sources of destination information for public health researchers. However, the suitability and accuracy of these data for public health research purposes has been generally unexplored.

Methods:

This study validated the presence and number of a broad range of destination types listed within an Australian-based commercial database (Yellow Pages), thought to be important for encouraging health behaviors, against those identified via field audit. The study was conducted in and around 5 housing developments within the RESIDential Environments project across metropolitan Perth, Western Australia.

Results:

Overall agreement of the count of destinations listed within the Yellow Pages ranged from 0.29–0.76, depending on the study area, the timing of the data extract and the geocoding methods used. Results also indicated considerable variation between different extracts from the same commercial dataset, and appreciable over- and under-counting of different destination types compared with field audit findings.

Conclusions:

The choice of database and extraction time and methods, have important implications in the quantification of neighborhood destination mix and robustness of associations with public health behaviors.

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Natalie Anderton, Megan E. Newhouse, Barbara E. Ainsworth, Ingrid E. Nygaard, Marlene J. Egger and Janet M. Shaw

Background:

Measuring historical physical activity in epidemiologic research depends on self-report. We aimed to describe data reporting errors women made in completing 2 validated questionnaires: Lifetime Physical Activity Questionnaire (LPAQ) and Occupational Questionnaire (OQ).

Methods:

Participants—229 women aged 38 to 65 years—completed questionnaires on paper (n = 160) or by web interface (n = 69). One research assistant collected questionnaire data, identified potential errors and contacted participants to trouble-shoot errors.

Results:

Women made mean 9.7 (SD 11.2) errors on paper and 7.1 (SD 6.2) errors on electronic versions of the LPAQ and 2.6 (SD 3.8) and 1.1 (SD 1.4) errors on paper and electronic versions of the OQ, respectively. Fewer mistakes were made on electronic versions of both questionnaires combined (8.5 ± 6.1) when compared with the paper versions (12.7 ± 13.1). Only ~2% of the sample completed all questionnaires without detectable errors. The most common errors were reporting activities or frequencies inconsistently between past year survey and the current age epoch, reporting more years than allowed by age epoch and missing information.

Conclusions:

Despite the implications of “self-report” questionnaires, we recommend researchers provide participants with additional instructions, either verbally or as written tip sheet or both, and follow-up after questionnaire completion to correct mistakes as needed.

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Jared M. Tucker, Greg Welk, Sarah M. Nusser, Nicholas K. Beyler and David Dzewaltowski

Background:

This study was designed to develop a prediction algorithm that would allow the Previous Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR) to be equated with temporally matched data from an accelerometer.

Methods:

Participants (n = 121) from a large, school-based intervention wore a validated accelerometer and completed the PDPAR for 3 consecutive days. Physical activity estimates were obtained from PDPAR by totaling 30-minute bouts of activity coded as ≥4 METS. A regression equation was developed in a calibration sample (n = 91) to predict accelerometer minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) from PDPAR bouts. The regression equation was then applied to a separate, holdout sample (n = 30) to evaluate the utility of the prediction algorithm.

Results:

Gender and PDPAR bouts accounted for 36.6% of the variance in accelerometer MVPA. The regression model showed that on average boys obtain 9.0 min of MVPA for each reported PDPAR bout, while girls obtain 4.8 min of MVPA per bout. When applied to the holdout sample, predicted minutes of MVPA from the models showed good agreement with accelerometer minutes (r = .81).

Conclusions:

The prediction equation provides a valid and useful metric to aid in the interpretation of PDPAR results.