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Cordeiro Barbosa Filho * Natália Boneti Moreira * Valdomiro de Oliveira * Oldemar Mazzardo * Wagner de Campos * 10 2015 23 4 524 533 10.1123/japa.2013-0070 Patterns of Weekday and Weekend Sedentary Behavior Among Older Adults Simon Marshall * Jacqueline Kerr * Jordan Carlson * Lisa Cadmus

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Gorden Sudeck, Stephanie Jeckel and Tanja Schubert

numbers of measurements per person ( Hoffman & Rovine, 2007 ). Restricted maximum likelihood estimations were used. The alpha level of the tests was set to p  < .05. Gender, age, BMI, and regular exercise behavior (Level 2), as well as weekday and squared time of day (Level 1) were included as covariates

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Marie H. Murphy, Angela Carlin, Catherine Woods, Alan Nevill, Ciaran MacDonncha, Kyle Ferguson and Niamh Murphy

setting. Sedentary Behavior Domain-specific sedentary behavior was measured using a modified version of an instrument which has been assessed for gender-specific test–retest reliability and validity. 37 The instrument required participants to estimate time spent sitting on weekdays and weekend days

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Sara Knaeps, Stijn De Baere, Jan Bourgois, Evelien Mertens, Ruben Charlier and Johan Lefevre

during waking hours only. 18 , 19 Furthermore, to achieve reliable estimates of total physical activity, only subjects who met the compliance criterion of at least 3 weekdays and both weekend days were admitted, resulting in the exclusion of 207 (32%) of the original 652 participants. 20 A drop

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Sigridur L. Gudmundsdottir

, 30 ). On the other hand, exercise and athletic training may also affect sleep quality and duration ( 15 ), and thus, the relationship between sleep and exercise is complex and reciprocal ( 7 ). Besides average sleep duration, consistency of sleep patterns (eg, bedtime and sleep duration on weekdays

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Albert R. Mendoza, Kate Lyden, John Sirard, John Staudenmayer, Catrine Tudor-Locke and Patty S. Freedson

) sessions were 29, 34, and 33, respectively. There were 62 weekday observation sessions and 34 weekend observation sessions. Table 2 Summary of Sessions by Day of Week and Time Block Weekday Weekend Day Total Sessions Morning 18 11 29 Afternoon 20 14 34 Evening 24 9 33 Total Sessions 62 34 96 Note . Morning

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Sarah G. Sanders, Elizabeth Yakes Jimenez, Natalie H. Cole, Alena Kuhlemeier, Grace L. McCauley, M. Lee Van Horn and Alberta S. Kong

school-based health centers. We will examine differences by sex, weight status, and day of the week, with the hypotheses that boys do more PA than girls, that teens with overweight and obesity do less PA than teens with normal weight, and that teens do less PA on the weekend versus weekdays. Methods

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Morgan Potter, John C. Spence, Normand Boulé, Jodie A. Stearns and Valerie Carson

reported both frequency and duration for each PA item for both weekdays and weekend day. The product of the minutes and frequency was summed across the activities and divided by 60 to create a total hours per week variable. Values >42 hours per week were considered as outliers and truncated to 42 hours ( n

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Heather McCracken and Shilpa Dogra

information on time spent sitting on a weekday. The frequency and duration of vigorous-intensity physical activity, moderate-intensity physical activity, walking, and sitting time were used to calculate minutes per week in that specific activity. This was then divided by 7 to calculate time spent in those

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Charity B. Breneman, Christopher E. Kline, Delia West, Xuemei Sui and Xuewen Wang

adjustment for day of the week (weekday night [Sunday through Thursday] vs. weekend night [Friday and Saturday]), baseline BMI, and average baseline MVPA levels. An interaction term for “time point” and “exercise/nonexercise day” was added to all models to assess whether the acute effect of exercise on sleep