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Nicolas Farina, Laura J. Hughes, Amber Watts and Ruth G. Lowry

Measuring physical activity is complicated, with trade-offs between the different types of available measures in terms of accuracy, acceptability, and feasibility ( Prince et al., 2008 ; Sylvia, Bernstein, Hubbard, Keating, & Anderson, 2014 ). Physical activity questionnaires have a distinct place

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Lia Grego Muniz de Araújo, Bruna Camilo Turi, Bruna Locci, Camila Angélica Asahi Mesquita, Natália Bonicontro Fonsati and Henrique Luiz Monteiro

arrival of new technological options replaced traditional activities involving physical effort, supporting the sedentary lifestyle. 3 , 4 The time spent in sedentary activities, such as television (TV), video games, computers, and cell phones, is considered a public health problem because of its

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Jessica St Aubin, Jennifer Volberding and Jack Duffy

associated with faster full return to sport and school/work. ▸ There is moderate evidence to support the incorporation of light to moderate physical activity within 7 days after a concussion in order to decrease recovery time and symptoms. Clinical Scenario Concussions are a growing epidemic and these

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Johanna Popp, Nanna Notthoff and Lisa Marie Warner

The beneficial effect of physical activity on health applies to people of all age groups ( Kyu et al., 2016 ). Nevertheless, the number of people older than 65 years of age in Germany who achieve the recommended exercise amount of 2.5 hr/week is rather low, at only 26.6% of women and 33.5% of men

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Rawan Hashem, Juan P. Rey-López, Mark Hamer, Anne McMunn, Peter H. Whincup, Christopher G. Owen, Alex Rowlands and Emmanuel Stamatakis

Lifestyle in modern industrialized societies is characterized by a pandemic of physical inactivity and the wide use of technology-based sedentary behaviors. For example, in a large survey, 80% of adolescents (13–15 y) were found to not meet physical activity (PA) recommendations [1 h/d of moderate

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Eduardo L. Caputo, Paulo H. Ferreira, Manuela L. Ferreira, Andréa D. Bertoldi, Marlos R. Domingues, Debra Shirley and Marcelo C. Silva

Physical activity offers significant benefits in the prevention of health complications that are commonly related to pregnancy, such as excessive body weight gain and diabetes. 1 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that, during pregnancy, women should engage

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Yuko Hashimoto, Ko Matsudaira, Susumu S. Sawada, Yuko Gando, Ryoko Kawakami, Chihiro Kinugawa, Takashi Okamoto, Koji Tsukamoto, Motohiko Miyachi, Hisashi Naito and Steven N. Blair

report has indicated that either low back pain or neck pain is the leading contributor to productivity loss. 5 Therefore, clarifying the current status of low back pain among workers is an important task to improve health and productivity in this population. Daily physical activity has been reported to

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Michelle E. Jordan, Kent Lorenz, Michalis Stylianou and Pamela Hodges Kulinna

Physical activity (PA) guidelines for children and adolescents highlight the need for PA and knowledge for developing healthy lifestyles ( USDHHS, 2008 ; WHO, 2010 ). However, a large proportion of American youth is not meeting the PA guidelines ( National PA Plan Alliance, 2014 ) and is lacking

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Soultana Macridis, Christine Cameron, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Tala Chulak-Bozzer, Patricia Clark, Margie H. Davenport, Guy Faulkner, Jonathon Fowles, Lucie Lévesque, Michelle M. Porter, Ryan E. Rhodes, Robert Ross, Elaine Shelton, John C. Spence, Leigh M. Vanderloo and Nora Johnston

The many health benefits of physical activity for adults include a reduced risk for all-cause mortality and a lower risk of developing chronic conditions (eg, obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, all-cancer mortality, depression, and delays in the onset of dementia). 1

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Karen Tonge, Rachel A. Jones and Anthony D. Okely

High levels of physical activity and low levels of sedentary behavior (SB) are associated with many psychosocial, cognitive, and physical health benefits for children below 5 years of age. 1 It is critical that positive physical activity behaviors develop in early childhood as these behaviors