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Blake Bennett

The integration of technology within educational contexts encourages a shift away from a direct instruction model and towards a learner-centred climate ( Harvey & Gittins, 2014 ). Given the greater focus on learner-centred coaching in the literature ( Cassidy, Potrac, & Jones, 2009 ; Kidman, 2005

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Leslie K. Larsen and Christopher J. Clayton

Over the past four decades, the percentage of US women working in many professions has increased significantly ( LaVoi, 2016a ). However, this trend does not hold true for women coaching in sport. Prior to the passing of Title IX in 1972, over 90% of collegiate women’s sports were coached by women

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Anthony Koschmann

Coaches play an instrumental role in helping their players to play to the best of their abilities as a team to win. Professional hockey coaches, for instance, decide which players will play on which lines, strategizing the matchups against opposing players, and create special team assignments

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Christoph Szedlak, Matthew Smith, Melissa Day and Bettina Callary

, 1994 ). S&C coaching can have many positive impacts on an athlete, including helping reduce the risk of injury and maximizing the athlete’s physiological potential ( Kontor, 1989 ; NSCA, 2015 ; UKSCA, 2015 ). A recent survey conducted by the United Kingdom Strength and Conditioning Association (UKSCA

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Robin S. Vealey, Eric Martin, Angela Coppola, Rose Marie Ward and Jacob Chamberlin

Coaching is a “people profession”, meaning that coaches are required to spend a great deal of interpersonal time developing their athletes’ physical, mental, and life skills. Although coaches’ influences on athletes may be significant and even life-changing, such an investment in others may come at

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David Barney

Coaching is a very visible profession, to the point that a coach’s every move is scrutinized. This was clearly evident in the tragic events that transpired in 2011, involving legendary American football coach Joe Paterno at Penn State University. With this high visibility, coaches need more than ever to set good examples for those they represent. In school or college settings they represent athletes, parents, the student body, administrators, and the community. The purpose of this commentary is to reinforce a coach’s responsibility to set a good example and the responsibility of coaching educators in preparing future coaches to be good examples.

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Andrew P. Driska

According to USA Swimming ( 2016 ), the national governing body for swimming in the United States, more than 340,000 children swam for a club affiliated with the organization.  Staff in the club development division report that the organization has mandated education for its coach members since

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Nicolas Robin, Lucette Toussaint, Eric Joblet, Emmanuel Roublot and Guillaume R. Coudevylle

from extrinsic feedback from an expert (i.e., soccer coach) during a practice session. Indeed, Schmidt and Lee ( 1999 ) evoked that physical education teachers and sport coach frequently use feedback during training and learning sessions. Landin ( 1996 ) noted that providing verbal feedback enhances

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Andrew Hammond, Ruth Jeanes, Dawn Penney and Deana Leahy

This paper explores the effects of “neoliberal-able rationality” sport policy and swimming coaches’ understandings of inclusion and disability. Recent research has highlighted how economic policies underpinned by neoliberal rationalities of government often see sport as a tool that can be used to

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Leapetswe Malete and Deborah L. Feltz

This study examined the effect of participation in a coaching education program compared to a control group on coaches’ perceived coaching efficacy. The program consisted of two 6-hour sessions. The Coaching Efficacy Scale was used to determine the impact of the program on perceived coaching efficacy. Forty-six Michigan high school coaches and 14 coaching preparation students were recruited for the experimental (n = 36) and control groups (n = 24) for this study. The participants were asked to respond to pretest and posttest CES questionnaires that examined how confident they were in influencing the learning and performance of their athletes in four dimensions of coaching: character building, motivation, strategy, and technique. Results showed a significant effect for a coaching education program on the perceived efficacy levels of the trained coaches compared to control coaches.