Search Results

You are looking at 141 - 150 of 960 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Evelyne Felber Charbonneau, Martin Camiré and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre

, 2000 ). This movement involves coaches expatriating to different countries and thus experiencing different cultures, values, and philosophies, as these vary from one nation to another ( Sekot, 2004 ). Despite increased international mobility in coaching, little research has examined coaches

Restricted access

Anne Sofie B. Malling, Bo M. Morberg, Lene Wermuth, Ole Gredal, Per Bech and Bente R. Jensen

-39 (PDQ39) is a well-established health-related QoL questionnaire ( Peto, Jenkinson, Fitzpatrick, & Greenhall, 1995 ). It consists of eight dimensions that assess mobility (PDQ39-Mob), activities of daily living (PDQ39-ADL), emotional well-being, stigma, social support, cognitions, communication, and

Restricted access

Julien Le Gal, Mickael Begon, Benoit Gillet and Isabelle Rogowski

dominant glenohumeral joint. Stretching exercises are commonly recommended to restore glenohumeral mobility. 10 A recent meta-analysis, however, highlights that there is little to moderate evidence on the effectiveness of the cross-body stretch and sleeper stretch exercises, performed alone or in

Restricted access

Scott W. Cheatham

.80 (40) Years in practice, y (N)  Average years in professional practice 12 (685) 5 (155) 11 (202) Immediate and lasting changes (>2 wk) with treatment, a % (N)  Increased joint ROM 40.14 (275) 61.11 (95) 76.24 (154)  Increased mobility 68.17 (467) 89

Restricted access

Nathan F. Meier, Yang Bai, Chong Wang and Duck-chul Lee

) after midlife are associated with mobility issues ( Manini et al., 2007 ), decreased quality of life, higher risk of falls ( Fukagawa, Wolfson, Judge, Whipple, & King, 1995 ), loss of independence ( Abellan Van Kan, 2009 ), and higher morbidity and mortality ( Aagaard, Suetta, Caserotti, Magnusson

Restricted access

Barry S. Mason, Viola C. Altmann and Victoria L. Goosey-Tolfrey

directly within the current study. Moreover, maneuverability is also a key indicator of mobility performance in WR, 20 yet it is difficult to quantify objectively, especially in a competition environment. Interestingly, trunk impairment contributed to the explained variance observed in a number of

Open access

Scott W. Cheatham and Russell Baker

to effectively assess treatment effectiveness and recommend safe application protocols. The stretch force values reported in this investigation provide an initial step toward confirming the optimal band stretch force needed to achieve desired effects, such as increasing myofascial mobility, joint ROM

Open access

Landon Lempke, Rebecca Wilkinson, Caitlin Murray and Justin Stanek

then, the knee extended until mild discomfort was felt for both interventions. Subjects had baseline hamstring mobility assessed. Participants were randomly assigned following baseline assessment to either 5 min of PNF or SS. Two additional variables were assessed by either 5 min following stretching

Open access

Tomohiro Yasuda

to evaluate the functional status of individuals and to identify and treat those at risk for mobility problems and frailty. In the periodic and field-based simplified approaches, the handgrip strength measurement has been widely used in clinical practice for the assessment of muscle size or strength

Restricted access

Kim T.J. Bongers, Yvonne Schoon, Maartje J. Graauwmans, Marlies E. Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde and Marcel G.M. Olde Rikkert

Self-management of mobility and fall risk might be possible if older adults could use a simple and safe self-test to measure their own mobility, balance, and fall risk at home. The aim of this study was to determine the safety, feasibility, and intraindividual reliability of the maximal step length (MSL), gait speed (GS), and chair test (CT) as potential self-tests for assessing mobility and fall risk. Fifty-six community-dwelling older adults performed MSL, GS, and CT at home once a week during a four-week period, wherein the feasibility, test-retest reliability, coefficients of variation, and linear mixed models with random effects of these three self-tests were determined. Forty-nine subjects (mean age 76.1 years [SD: 4.0], 19 females [42%]) completed the study without adverse effects. Compared with the other self-tests, MSL gave the most often (77.6%) valid measurement results and had the best intraclass correlation coefficients (0.95 [95% confidence interval: 0.91−0.97]). MSL and GS gave no significant training effect, whereas CT did show a significant training effect (p < .01). Community-dwelling older adults can perform MSL safely, correctly, and reliably, and GS safely and reliably. Further research is needed to study the responsiveness and beneficial effects of these self-tests on self-management of mobility and fall risk.