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Jasmin Bhawra, Priyanka Chopra, Ranjani Harish, Anjana Mohan, Krishnaveni V. Ghattu, Kumaran Kalyanaraman and Tarun R. Katapally

youth in India. Figure 1 —India’s 2018 Report Card cover. Table 1 Grades and Rationales for India’s 2018 Report Card Indicators Grades Rationale Overall Physical Activity D Approximately 25% of children and youth accumulate ≥ 60 minutes of MVPA daily. It is expected that children and youth from rural

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Chalchisa Abdeta, Zelalem Teklemariam, Alem Deksisa and Endashew Abera

children and youth (17% urban & 39% rural) meet 60 minutes moderate physical activity every day. Organized Sport Participation C Almost 50% of children and youth are participating in school athletics, handball, volleyball and football competitions at all levels for several times in a year. Active Play B

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Vernon M. Grant, Emily J. Tomayko, Ronald J. Prince, Kate Cronin and Alexandra Adams

tribal communities nationwide. Participants included 450 adult and child (aged 2–5 y) dyads from rural and urban communities. The study sample is noteworthy as few studies have included both urban- and rural-based families concurrently. Moreover, the included communities spanned 5 states and ranged in

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Kelsey L. Boulé and Courtney W. Mason

include several rural communities, depend on both the subsistence and economic benefits of hunting. The results of this study indicate the importance of inclusive policies that balance the needs of local peoples and tourism economies, increase the awareness of the general public on hunting, and find

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Taru Manyanga, Nyaradzai E. Munambah, Carol B. Mahachi, Daga Makaza, Tholumusa F. Mlalazi, Vincent Masocha, Paul Makoni, Fortunate Sithole, Bhekuzulu Khumalo, Sipho H. Rutsate and Tonderayi M. Matsungo

there was some variation between boys and girls as well as between rural and urban areas. The proportion of boys walking to and from school was lower (79%) compared with girls (82%). Use of active transport was lower (78%) among urban and higher (88%) among rural school children and youth. Sedentary

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Dawn M. Tladi, Malebogo Monnaatsie, Sheila Shaibu, Gaonyadiwe Sinombe, Gaonyadiwe G. Mokone, Lesego Gabaitiri, Leapetswe Malete and Hubona Omphile

expert opinion. Approximately 20% of the children play actively, mostly children living in rural areas. No empirical evidence is available that addresses active play, let alone the specifics of active play (e.g., frequency, duration, type). Active Transportation C 49% of 13-15 year olds show that they

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Catherine E. Draper, Simone A. Tomaz, Linda Biersteker, Caylee J. Cook, Jacqui Couper, Monique de Milander, Kamesh Flynn, Sonja Giese, Soezin Krog, Estelle V. Lambert, Tamarin Liebenberg, Cyndi Mendoza, Terri Nunes, Anita Pienaar, Alessandra Priorieschi, Dale E. Rae, Nafeesa Rahbeeni, John J. Reilly, Louis Reynolds, Marie-Louise Samuels, Ricardo Siljeur, Jody Urion, Mariza van Wyk and Anthony D. Okely

.1) minutes per day; 96.9% of children met current guidelines published by the Canadians and Australians. 2 , 3 Boys were significantly more active than girls, and urban high-income children were significantly less active than urban low-income and rural low-income children. Similar findings have been

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Angela Coppola, Thomas Curran, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Mary Jung, Larkin Lamarche, Luc Martin and Kathleen Wilson

intergenerational studies that take into account the perspectives of children, parents, and grandparents. The current study explored the perceptions of intergenerational changes in AFP among families from understudied rural areas. Using an ecological framework of active play, the authors explored how AFP has

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Nathan Hall, Brent Bradford, José da Costa and Daniel B. Robinson

.e., specialist vs. generalist), and rural and urban settings. Findings and Discussion The following data are descriptive in nature and are not intended to represent all PE programs. These data describe how participants teach AEAs in PE. Data analyses relied upon the following four processes: (a

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James E. Johnson, Chrysostomos Giannoulakis and Beau F. Scott

interscholastic competitive balance policy relative to a number of variables (i.e., public/nonpublic, rural, metropolitan, classification status, and tournament result). A 16-year review of Indiana high school state champions and runners-up in all sports revealed that most of the success was garnered by nonpublic