Search Results

You are looking at 151 - 160 of 277 items for :

  • "global positioning systems" x
Clear All
Restricted access

.1123/ijspp.2017-0434 ijspp.2017-0434 Decisive Moment: A Metric to Determine Success in Elite Karate Bouts Montassar Tabben * Bianca Miarka * Karim Chamari * Ralph Beneke * 1 09 2018 13 8 1000 1004 10.1123/ijspp.2017-0526 ijspp.2017-0526 Comparing Global Positioning System and Global Navigation

Restricted access

Meeusen * 10 2016 11 7 933 939 10.1123/ijspp.2015-0570 Relationship Between External and Internal Loads of Professional Soccer Players During Full Matches in Official Games Using Global Positioning Systems and Heart-Rate Technology Nacho Torreño * Diego Munguía-Izquierdo * Aaron Coutts

Restricted access

Blake D. McLean, Cloe Cummins, Greta Conlan, Grant Duthie and Aaron J. Coutts

Global positioning systems (GPS) that are embedded in microtechnology devices have previously been shown to be reliable for measuring the activity profiles of field-based team-sport athletes. 1 In addition to GPS data, these microtechnology devices contain accelerometers that provide information

Restricted access

Glaister * Colin Towey * Owen Jeffries * Daniel Muniz-Pumares * Paul Foley * Gillian McInnes * 1 04 2019 14 4 426 431 10.1123/ijspp.2018-0458 ijspp.2018-0458 Interunit Reliability and Effect of Data-Processing Methods of Global Positioning Systems Heidi R. Thornton * André R. Nelson * Jace A

Restricted access

Kieran Cooke, Tom Outram, Raph Brandon, Mark Waldron, Will Vickery, James Keenan and Jamie Tallent

workload (ie, training doses) from global positioning system tracking, 1 time motion analysis, 2 number of overs bowled, 3 – 5 while internal loads have been quantified using subjective measures, such as perception of effort. 6 Although these techniques can quantify the training dose–response and

Restricted access

Ryan M. Chambers, Tim J. Gabbett and Michael H. Cole

Commercially available microtechnology devices containing global positioning systems (GPSs) and microsensors (accelerometers, gyroscopes, and magnetometers) are commonly used to quantify the physical demands of rugby union. 1 During match play and training, players are divided into subgroups of

Restricted access

Mitchell J. Henderson, Job Fransen, Jed J. McGrath, Simon K. Harries, Nick Poulos and Aaron J. Coutts

Rugby sevens performance is multifactorial and involves physical, technical, and tactical components. With the increased availability of athlete-tracking microtechnologies and load-monitoring tools such as global positioning systems and microelectrical mechanical systems, 1 professional field

Restricted access

Benjamin G. Serpell, Joshua Strahorn, Carmen Colomer, Andrew McKune, Christian Cook and Kate Pumpa

standardized warm-up followed by reactive strength, low-load speed strength, high-load speed strength, and maximum strength exercises (see Table  1 ). Captain’s run was 30 minutes long and global positioning system (GPS) data were collected, also as per standard practice at the club (15 Hz SPI-HPU; GPSports

Restricted access

Live S. Luteberget, Benjamin R. Holme and Matt Spencer

Analyses of physical demands in team sports can provide a better understanding of physical performance. This may help to improve the practice of training and the physical development of players, 1 – 3 in addition to load management. 4 , 5 Global positioning system (GPS) technology is one of the

Restricted access

Shaun J. McLaren, Jonathan M. Taylor, Tom W. Macpherson, Iain R. Spears and Matthew Weston

-sprint rest periods was retained. Data were expressed as a percentage of maximum heart rate, determined as the highest value recorded during Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1. Player’s external training activities were monitored using microsensor units containing a 10-Hz global positioning system and a