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Blake D. McLean, Donald Strack, Jennifer Russell and Aaron J. Coutts

provides perspectives on how some of these issues surrounding player tracking and athlete monitoring may be overcome. Emerging Technologies in the NBA The recent widespread adoption of emerging technologies (eg, Global Positioning System [GPS] technology) in many international team sports has led to an

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Matthew R. Blair, Nathan Elsworthy, Nancy J. Rehrer, Chris Button and Nicholas D. Gill

Committee. Design During elite Super Rugby matches, referees wore a HR monitor (1 Hz; Polar Electro, Kempele, Finland) to record their HR responses throughout each from a strap worn around the referee’s chest and recorded by the Global Positioning System (GPS) device. Time–motion analysis was completed

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Benjamin G. Serpell, Joshua Strahorn, Carmen Colomer, Andrew McKune, Christian Cook and Kate Pumpa

standardized warm-up followed by reactive strength, low-load speed strength, high-load speed strength, and maximum strength exercises (see Table  1 ). Captain’s run was 30 minutes long and global positioning system (GPS) data were collected, also as per standard practice at the club (15 Hz SPI-HPU; GPSports

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Steve Barrett

Monitoring training and match loads in elite team sports is common practice for applied sport scientists and medical staff. 1 MEMS devices (Micromechanical Electrical Systems) containing global positioning systems (GPS) and accelerometers have been utilized in team sports to monitor players

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Georgia M. Black, Tim J. Gabbett, Richard D. Johnston, Geraldine Naughton, Michael H. Cole and Brian Dawson

performances were measured using Global Positioning System (GPS) units across 1 competitive season. Matches were comprised of 4 × 20-minute quarters with no time-on added to the game clock. The dichotomization of data was completed into 3 phases. First, each player’s data were categorized into 3 different

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Callum J. McCaskie, Warren B. Young, Brendan B. Fahrner and Marc Sim

injury prevention sessions such as massage, yoga, and hydrotherapy. 7 On-field sessions are commonly monitored using global positioning system (GPS) technology, providing measures of external load such as total distance and distances covered in various speed zones. 8 Especially in early preseason

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Live S. Luteberget, Benjamin R. Holme and Matt Spencer

Analyses of physical demands in team sports can provide a better understanding of physical performance. This may help to improve the practice of training and the physical development of players, 1 – 3 in addition to load management. 4 , 5 Global positioning system (GPS) technology is one of the

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Georgia M. Black, Tim J. Gabbett, Rich D. Johnston, Michael H. Cole, Geraldine Naughton and Brian Dawson

profiles were measured using global positioning system (GPS) units during 14 matches. All participants completed 2 field sessions per week with their respective clubs during the preseason. This project was completed in 3 phases. First, the sample was separated into selected and nonselected players for the

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David L. Carey, Justin Crow, Kok-Leong Ong, Peter Blanch, Meg E. Morris, Ben J. Dascombe and Kay M. Crossley

mathematical constraints. • Match demands were taken from the 2015 AFL GPS Report 14 and incorporated by constraining the total match distance to be 13,200 m ( w 125  = 13,200). This is an average value and may not reflect the largest loads seen in matches or the differences between playing positions. By

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Adam Grainger, Paul Comfort and Shane Heffernan

subsequent training weeks involved both field- and gym-based training, with repeated testing taking place at consistent time points pretraining and posttraining. Throughout these training weeks, GPS data were used to quantify field load, while gym load was standardized and consistent—with typical in