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Sheryl Miller and Mary Fry

were invited to complete a survey three weeks prior to the end of the semester. Of the participants, 79% identified as Caucasian/White, with the remaining being African American/Black (6.3%), Hispanic/Latino (4.7%), Asian/Pacific Island (4.0%), Native American (.9%), and other (5%). The majority of

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Aubrey Newland, Maria Newton, E. Whitney G. Moore and W. Eric Legg

comprised of Caucasians (50%), African Americans (11.7%), Latinos (8.7%), Pacific Islanders (4.4%), Asian (2.5%), and “Other” (22%). Teams came from the Mountain West region of the United States. Over 70% of participants reported being coached by their current coach for more than one year. Of the 28

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Hans C. Schmidt

://www.journalism.org/fact-sheet/newspapers/ Ortiz , M. , & Behm-Morawitz , E. ( 2015 ). Latinos’ perceptions of intergroup relations in the United States: The cultivation of group-based attitudes and beliefs from English- and Spanish-language television . Journal of Social Issues, 71 ( 1 ), 90 – 105 . doi:10.1111/josi.12098 10.1111/josi

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William C. Way, Ashley M. Coker-Cranney and Jack C. Watson II

institution’s conference. Participants were predominantly female (80.4%). Over three-quarters of the sample identified as White (78.3%), 7.4% identified with two or more races / ethnic backgrounds, 5.2% identified as Hispanic or Latino or Spanish Origin of any race, 4.8% identified as Black or African

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Hannah G. Calvert, Lindsey Turner, Julien Leider, Elizabeth Piekarz-Porter and Jamie F. Chriqui

Latino children’s fitness: does the association vary by school neighborhood socioeconomic advantage? PLos One . 2017 ; 12 ( 6 ): e0178980 . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0178980 10.1371/journal.pone.0178980 28591139 25. Kelder SH , Springer AS , Barroso CS , et al. Implementation of Texas Senate

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Sitong Guo, Andrew C. Billings and James C. Abdallah

/Pacific Islander = 16%, African American = 9%, Hispanic/Latino = 4%, Native American = 2%), which region of the United States they were from (South =46%, Northeast = 24%, Midwest = 18%, West = 12%), and educational level (undergraduate degree = 40%, college student = 36%, master’s degree = 12%, no college = 8

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Gregory A. Cranmer and Sara LaBelle

games ( M  = 59.66%, SD  = 28.75%). See Table  1 for a full account of participants’ demographic data. Table 1 Participant Demographics, N  = 184 Variable n % Age (years) M  = 16.19 SD  = 1.17 Sex  male 182 98.9%  female 2 1.1% Race  White 104 56.5%  Black/African American 69 37.5%  Hispanic/Latino 5

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Janet L. Hauck, Isabella T. Felzer-Kim and Kathryn L. Gwizdala

 = European American; AA = African American; AS = Asian; H/L = Hispanic/Latino; HS = high school diploma; SC = some college; AD = associate’s degree; BD = bachelor’s degree; MAS = master’s degree; DOC = doctorate; S = single; MAR = married; DIV = divorced; BMI = body mass index; H = healthy; OV = overweight

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Margo Mountjoy, Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen, Louise Burke, Kathryn E. Ackerman, Cheri Blauwet, Naama Constantini, Constance Lebrun, Bronwen Lundy, Anna Melin, Nanna Meyer, Roberta Sherman, Adam S. Tenforde, Monica Klungland Torstveit and Richard Budgett

speculative. Research shows a lower risk of disordered eating (DE) in African-American, but not Latino female high-school athletes compared to Caucasians ( Pernick et al., 2006 ; Rhea, 1999 ). It is currently unknown whether the prevalence of menstrual disorders differs among racially diverse athletic groups

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Christopher R. Barnhill, W. Andrew Czekanski and Adam G. Pfleegor

identified as White were the largest group of respondents ( n  = 221, 66.4%), followed by Black ( n  = 84, 25.2%), Asian ( n  = 5, 1.5%), Hispanic or Latino ( n  = 3, 0.9%), and Native American ( n  = 2, 0.6%). Two students (0.6%) declared their race as other and eight (2.4%) chose not to respond