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Madhura Phansikar and Sean P. Mullen

continuous social interaction (e.g., engaging in group classes). Even for a common activity such as walking, engaging in walking for leisure may last longer in duration or reach higher intensity levels than active traveling. For example, active traveling is likely to be more restricted by environmental and

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Dawn Anderson-Butcher

social interactions so youth have opportunities to use and master social and/or life skills. • Create a sense of belonging and identity among the team or group. • Foster prosocial relationships among peers, teammates, parents/caregivers, and adult leaders. • Encourage other adult involvement and buy

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Pierre Lepage, Gordon A. Bloom and William R. Falcão

. The learning of the current participants was also impacted by their social interactions with staff members and athletes’ parents, a finding that appeared to be more pronounced than in previous research ( Cregan et al., 2007 ; Fairhurst et al., 2017 ; Tawse et al., 2012 ). Given that parents in the

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Maya Maor

outside social interactions before or after classes. He sometimes reacted to jokes by the head instructor of the new gym, but never initiated any social interaction beyond training. Adolescent Boys as Central(ized) The materials presented above reveal much about the dual and contradictory status of boys

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Victoria McGee and J.D. DeFreese

innovative applied future research direction, athletes could be trained on specific behavioral and/or communication strategies designed to initiate positive social interactions with their coaches. The study was limited by a relatively small sample size, with attrition across study waves, as well as a fairly

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Allison Ross, Ja Youn Kwon, Pamela Hodges Kulinna and Mark Searle

, their social interactions, and environments. 57 – 59 Several researchers have developed models to explain the factors that influence ATS behavior (eg, McMillan, 60 Mitra, 12 Panter et al, 61 Pont et al, 62 Sirard and Slater 63 ), supporting the complexity of ATS behavior. For example, given

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Roy David Samuel

social and professional reasons. First, the Premier League referees spend much time together in conferences and training sessions, so the newly promoted referees wished to be socially accepted and feel comfortable in these social interactions. Second, they are assigned to matches together, serving as a

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Sheryl Miller and Mary Fry

effort and improvement and where positive affirming social interactions with instructors and classmates occur. As noted and hypothesized, the relationship between climate to BE and SPA was similar across gender. Results for females were nearly identical to those for the total sample. The results for

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Claire R. Jenkin, Rochelle M. Eime, Hans Westerbeek and Jannique G.Z. van Uffelen

family-type atmosphere” (69-year-old male tennis club member). Participants also expressed that sport clubs can provide opportunities for social interaction: “In the world of cricket . . . you always have a friend” (69-year-old female cricket club member) and “We come together for the socialization, don

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Kelsey Lucca, David Gire, Rachel Horton and Jessica A. Sommerville

revealed that researchers tend to use a specific subset of tasks when measuring persistence that can be classified in six general categories: cause-and-effect/means-end toys, puzzles or shape sorters, standardized assessments, questionnaires, tools/utensils, or dyadic social interactions (Table  2 ). These