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Ronald J. Maughan, Louise M. Burke, Jiri Dvorak, D. Enette Larson-Meyer, Peter Peeling, Stuart M. Phillips, Eric S. Rawson, Neil P. Walsh, Ina Garthe, Hans Geyer, Romain Meeusen, Luc van Loon, Susan M. Shirreffs, Lawrence L. Spriet, Mark Stuart, Alan Vernec, Kevin Currell, Vidya M. Ali, Richard G.M. Budgett, Arne Ljungqvist, Margo Mountjoy, Yannis Pitsiladis, Torbjørn Soligard, Uğur Erdener and Lars Engebretsen

Dietary Supplements Health and Education Act (DSHEA), described a dietary supplement as: “. . . a product, other than tobacco, which is used in conjunction with a healthy diet and contains one or more of the following dietary ingredients: a vitamin, mineral, herb or other botanical, an amino acid, a

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Dana M. Lis, Daniel Kings and D. Enette Larson-Meyer

psychosocial anxiety, and compromised energy/nutrient intake ( Hill et al., 2017 ; Staudacher et al., 2017 ). Historically, a GFD has also been associated with suboptimal intake of iron, B vitamins, and protein and higher intake of sugar and fat. With significant improvements in commercially available gluten

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activity. Poster Presentations May 9–10, 2018 Does Vitamin D Status Influence the Exertional Stress Induced Neutrophil Response to 2 Hours Running at 70% V ˙ O 2 max? David Dixon, MSc 1,2 ; Vera Camões-Costa 3 ; Rhiannon Snipe 3 ; Ricardo J.S. Costa, PhD 3 1 Coventry University, UK, 2 Writtle University

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does not provide an ergogenic benefit for trained males and females. Vitamin D Status of the Players of the Japanese National Badminton Team N Matsumoto 1 , T Iizuka 2 , K Chino 1 , JB Park 2 and M Dohi 1 1 Japan Institute of Sports Sciences 2 Nippon Badminton Association As vitamin D is essential for

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Helen G. Hanstock, Andrew D. Govus, Thomas B. Stenqvist, Anna K. Melin, Øystein Sylta and Monica K. Torstveit

availability (LEA), vitamin D and iron deficiency may compromise immune function in athletes. 9 Although studies have explored the relative importance of multiple training- and lifestyle-related risk factors for illness in athletes, 10 , 11 to our knowledge, no studies have modeled nutritional risk factors

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Eric Tsz-Chun Poon, John O’Reilly, Sinead Sheridan, Michelle Mingjing Cai and Stephen Heung-Sang Wong

micronutrients such as calcium and vitamin D, consequently leading to bone-specific clinical conditions, including osteopenia and osteoporosis ( O’Reilly et al., 2016 ; Warrington et al., 2009 ). Recently, osteopenia characterized by a bone mineral density (BMD) T score between −1 and −2.5 in the lower limb

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Nathan A. Lewis, Andrew J. Simpkin, Sarah Moseley, Gareth Turner, Mark Homer, Ann Redgrave, Charles R. Pedlar and Richard Burden

derived from Trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), a derivative of vitamin E with enhanced water solubility. FORD values are reported as Trolox equivalents, mmol·L −1 , linearity ranged from 0.25 to 3.0 mmol·L −1 Trolox. Screening Blood Tests Additional blood draws via the

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Rachel Lohman, Amelia Carr and Dominique Condo

); at the same time, their fat intake should accommodate their individual training loads, energy budgets, and body composition goals ( Thomas et al., 2016 ). Furthermore, athletes should avoid fat intake below 20% of energy intake to ensure adequate intake of fat-soluble vitamins and essential fatty

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Iñigo Mujika

 ± 486 Iodine (µg) 139 ± 37 343 ± 109 Thiamin (mg) 3.6 ± 0.6 1.8 ± 0.4 Riboflavin (mg) 4.5 ± 1.0 4.6 ± 1.6 Niacin (mg) 43 ± 7 44 ± 10 Vitamin C (mg) 520 ± 136 49 ± 26 Vitamin A (µg) 1008 ± 643 1516 ± 547 Vitamin D (µg) 4.5 ± 2.7 7.6 ± 2.3 Vitamin E (mg) 18 ± 11 31 ± 6 Vitamin B6 (mg) 5.4 ± 0.7 4.1 ± 1

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Keith Baar

( Paxton et al., 2012 ). Nutrition Intervention Normal dietary intake for the player was not tracked, nor did the player report changes in dietary intake over the length of the study. One hour before the patellar tendon targeted training program, the athlete consumed 15 g of gelatin with ∼225 mg vitamin C