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Gabriel Lozano-Berges, Ángel Matute-Llorente, Alejandro Gómez-Bruton, Alejandro González-Agüero, Germán Vicente-Rodríguez and José A. Casajús

The assessment of percentage of body fat (%BF) is often performed in sport clubs to monitor body composition changes in the athletes during the season due to its relationship with physical fitness and performance ( Avlonitou et al., 1997 ). Anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance analysis, dual

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Mark A. Leydon and Clare Wall

The purpose of this study was to determine the nutritional status, eating behaviors, and body composition of 20 jockeys working in the New Zealand Racing Industry. Seven-day weighed food records showed the mean daily energy intake for male and female jockeys was 6769 ± 1339 kJ and 6213 ± 1797 kJ, respectively. Energy and carbohydrate intakes were below the recommendations for athletes, and the jockeys did not meet the RDI for a number of micronu-trients. Of the jockeys, 67% used a variety of methods to "make weight". including: diuretics, saunas, hot baths, exercise, and the restriction of food and fluids. A number of jockeys (20%) showed signs of disordered eating. Forty-four percent of jockeys were classified as osteopenic, and a number of factors may have contributed to this outcome, namely: reduced calcium intake, delayed menarche (14.5 years) in female jockeys, alcohol intake, and smoking. Percent body fat of male and female jockeys was 11.7 ± 2.9 and 23.6 ± 3.8, respectively. Current weight restrictions imposed on jockeys by the horseracing industry impacts on their nutritional status, which may compromise their sporting performance and both their short- and long-term health.

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Stanley S.C. Hui, Neil Thomas and Brian Tomlinson

Background:

The impact of physical activity, aerobic fitness, and body composition on coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in Hong Kong Chinese adults has not been previously investigated.

Methods:

The study surveyed 707 randomly selected middle-age Hong Kong Chinese by telephone for Physical Activity Rating (PAR). Three hundred and sixteen respondents (age: 45.1 ± 8.1 y) participated in subsequent aerobic fitness testing (VO2max) and CHD risk factor screening.

Results:

More than 70% of respondents did not have sufficient levels of physical activity. Fifty percent of the men and 19.5% of the women had two or more CHD risk factors. PAR correlated poorly with VO2max and CHD risk factors. VO2max showed significant associations with CHD risk factors. The adjusted odds ratios of having CHD risk factors for unfit participants ranged from 1.11 to 6.61 as compared to fit participants. Obese but fit individuals demonstrated lower odds of CHD risk factors than the obese and unfit individuals. WC was found to be a stronger predictor for CHD risk factors than BMI.

Conclusions:

The prevalence of CHD risk factors in middle-age Chinese in Hong Kong was high and was related to levels of aerobic fitness and obesity.

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Stacy D. Hunter, Mandeep S. Dhindsa, Emily Cunningham, Takashi Tarumi, Mohammed Alkatan, Nantinee Nualnim and Hirofumi Tanaka

Background:

Obesity is associated with arterial stiffening and diminished quality of life. Bikram yoga may be a feasible alternative to traditional exercise among obese individuals. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of Bikram yoga, a heated style of hatha yoga, on arterial stiffness in normal and overweight/obese adults.

Methods:

Forty-three (23 normal body mass index or BMI; 20 overweight/obese) apparently healthy participants completed an 8-week Bikram yoga intervention. Body composition was estimated via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, arterial stiffness was measured via brachialankle pulse wave velocity, and health-related quality of life was assessed via RAND 36-Item Short Form survey at baseline and at the end of the 8-week intervention.

Results:

After the intervention, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity decreased (P < .05) in overweight/obese participants while no such changes were observed in normal BMI participants. In the quality of life measures, emotional well-being improved (P < .05) in both groups, and general health improved (P < .05) only in the normal weight BMI group.

Conclusion:

Bikram yoga ameliorates arterial stiffness in overweight/obese adults and can positively impact quality of life regardless of BMI.

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Veronica A. Mullins, Linda B. Houtkooper, Wanda H. Howell, Scott B. Going and C. Harmon Brown

This study describes the body composition, dietary nutrient intake, dietary practices, and biochemical indices of iron status of elite female American heptathletes during training. Four-day diet records and dietary practice questionnaires were obtained from 19 female heptathletes (26 ± 3 years) during the training season. Anthropometric measurements and fasting blood samples were obtained at the lowest phase of the training cycle. These athletes had a low body fat (13.8 ± 2.7%) and high fat-free mass to height ratios (33.0 ± 2.0 kg/m). Average nutrient intakes were > 67% of the reference intakes for all nutrients except vitamin E. Most dietary nutrient densities were higher than NHANES III nutrient densities for women 20–29 years old. More than 50% of the athletes took vitamin supplements and monitored their hydration status. Fifteen of the 17 athletes reported a normal menstrual cycle. Markers of biochemical iron status were all within the normal range. On average, these athletes were lean with high levels of fat free mass, adequate nutrient intakes, and normal biochemical indices of iron status. However, individual data reveals considerable variability within this group.

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Felipe Fossati Reichert, Ana Maria Batista Menezes, Jonathan Charles Kingdom Wells, Ulf Ekelund, Fabiane Machado Rodrigues and Pedro Curi Hallal

Background:

Prospective studies on physical activity (PA), diet, and body composition in adolescents are lacking, particularly outside high-income countries.

Goals:

To describe the methods used to assess these variables in the 1993 Pelotas (Brazil) Birth Cohort and to discuss the fieldwork challenges faced and alternatives to overcome them.

Methods:

In 2006–07 a subsample of the 1993 Pelotas cohort was revisited. PA was estimated using questionnaires, a combined heart-rate and motion sensor (Acti-Heart), and the ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer. Diet was investigated by questionnaire. Total body water was determined by stable isotopes. Thirty individuals had their total energy expenditure assessed by doubly labeled water. All data were collected at participants’ home.

Results:

The logistics of the fieldwork and the difficulties in undertaking the study and alternatives to overcome them are presented. Preliminary analyses show that 511 individuals were traced (response rate = 90.0%). Compliance of both adolescents and their families for the motion sensors and body-composition measurements was excellent.

Conclusions:

The authors conclude that it is feasible to carry out high-quality studies on PA in developing countries. They hope the article will be useful to other researchers interested in carrying out similar studies.

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Ehsan Ghahramanloo, Adrian W. Midgley and David J. Bentley

Background:

There is little information regarding the effects of concurrent training (endurance and resistance training performed in the same overall regimen) on blood lipid profile in sedentary male subjects. This study compared the effects of 3 different 8-wk training programs [endurance training (ET), strength training (ST) and concurrent training (CT)] on blood lipid profile and body composition in untrained young men.

Methods:

A total of 27 subjects were randomly allocated to an ET, ST or CT group which performed either progressive treadmill (ET), free weight (ST) or both the endurance and strength training requirements for 8 weeks.

Results:

High-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein profiles significantly improved in the ET and CT groups (P < .01) but not in the ST group. Triglyceride and total cholesterol profiles significantly improved in all 3 training groups. Total fat mass significantly decreased in the ET and CT groups (P < .001) but not in the ST group, whereas fat free mass significantly increased in the ST and CT groups (P < .01) but not in the ET group.

Conclusions:

These results indicate that CT can be used to simultaneously improve both the serum lipid profile and body composition of previously untrained, apparently health young men.

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James P. Veale, Alan J. Pearce, David Buttifant and John S. Carlson

Purpose:

Body structure and physical development must be addressed when preparing junior athletes for their first season in a senior competition. The aim of this preliminary study was to measure the extent of the assumption that final year junior Australian Football (AF) athletes are at a physical mismatch to their senior counterparts.

Methods:

Twenty-one male participants (17.71 ± 0.27 y) were recruited from one state based elite junior AF competition and forty-one male participants (22.80 ± 4.24 y) were recruited from one club competing in the senior elite Australian Football League (AFL), who were subsequently divided into two groups; professional rookies aged 18-20 y (19.44 ± 0.70 y; n = 18) and professional seniors aged 21+ y (25.43 ± 3.98 y; n = 23). Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans of all participants were completed.

Results:

Despite being an average 6.0% and 6.1% lighter in total weight and lean mass respectively, no significant difference was found between the elite junior athletes and their professional AFL rookie counterparts. However, significant differences were demonstrated in comparison with the professional AFL senior athletes (P < .01). Both professional AFL groups demonstrated greater than 0.3 kg total bone mineral content (BMC) than the elite junior athletes (P < .01) and significantly greater segmental BMC and bone mineral density (BMD) results (P < .05).

Conclusion:

While the results identify the differences in body composition of the elite junior athletes, development in a linear fashion is noted, providing useful information for the creation of age appropriate expectations and training programs.

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Alis Bonsignore, David Field, Rebecca Speare, Lianne Dolan, Paul Oh and Daniel Santa Mina

treatment, which include deleterious changes to body composition (eg, bone mineral density, muscular atrophy, increased body fat percentage), physical capacity, fatigue, metabolism (eg, increased blood triglycerides, cholesterol, and impaired glycemic control), psychological well-being, and health

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Simone A. Tomaz, Alessandra Prioreschi, Estelle D. Watson, Joanne A. McVeigh, Dale E. Rae, Rachel A. Jones and Catherine E. Draper

favorable measures of body composition, along with a range of positive psychosocial and health outcomes. 6 Research from high-income countries shows that complying with the PA and SB components of the guidelines is associated with better health and developmental outcomes. 6 – 10 Evidence supporting the