Search Results

You are looking at 171 - 180 of 1,593 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Amanda M. Ward, Torrey M. Loucks, Edward Ofori and Jacob J. Sosnoff

Audiomotor and visuomotor short-term memory are required for an important variety of skilled movements but have not been compared in a direct manner previously. Audiomotor memory capacity might be greater to accommodate auditory goals that are less directly related to movement outcome than for visually guided tasks. Subjects produced continuous isometric force with the right index finger under auditory and visual feedback. During the first 10 s of each trial, subjects received continuous auditory or visual feedback. For the following 15 s, feedback was removed but the force had to be maintained accurately. An internal effort condition was included to test memory capacity in the same manner but without external feedback. Similar decay times of ~5–6 s were found for vision and audition but the decay time for internal effort was ~4 s. External feedback thus provides an advantage in maintaining a force level after feedback removal, but may not exclude some contribution from a sense of effort. Short-term memory capacity appears longer than certain previous reports but there may not be strong distinctions in capacity across different sensory modalities, at least for isometric force.

Restricted access

James N. Roemmich, Christina L. Lobarinas, Jacob E. Barkley, Tressa M. White, Rocco Paluch and Leonard H. Epstein

This study evaluated the effectiveness of an open-loop system that reinforces physical activity with TV watching to increase children’s physical activity. Nonoverweight, sedentary boys and girls (8–12 y) were randomized to a group that received feedback of activity counts + reinforcement for physical activity by providing access to television (F+R, n = 20); or to feedback, no reinforcement (Feedback, n = 20) or no feedback, no reinforcement control (Control, n = 21) groups. Children wore an accelerometer with a count display for 4-months with a 1-year follow-up. F+R reduced TV by 68 min/day and TV time was lower than the Feedback (p < .005) and Control (p < .002) groups. TV time of F+R remained 31 min lower (p < .02) than baseline at 1-year. F+R had a 44% increase in physical activity, which was greater than the feedback (p < .04) and control (p < .01) groups. An open-loop system decreases TV viewing and increases physical activity of children for 4-months. TV of the F+R group remained lower at 12 months, suggesting a reduction in screen-time habits.

Restricted access

Zachary C. Merz, Joanne E. Perry and Michael J. Ross

assessment completion and feedback. Supervision with a board-certified clinical psychologist with an extensive background in clinical sport psychology was sought following each therapeutic session. Intervention Stage 1: Psychoeducation and Cognitive Assessment Trent’s primary reasons for referral included

Restricted access

Stephanie Field, Jeff Crane, Patti-Jean Naylor and Viviene Temple

increasingly diverse social environments (e.g. exposure to new sources of feedback from teachers, coaches, test scores) ( Horn, 2004 ; Kipp & Weiss, 2013 ). This, coupled with cognitive development that includes the ability to take another’s perspective and compare performances between peers ( Eccles, 1999

Restricted access

Lindsay T. Starling and Michael I. Lambert

only like to allocate a short period of time to executing it. Immediate feedback was rated by the majority of respondents as the most important characteristic an athlete monitoring protocol should fulfill, followed closely by “time efficient.” The majority of respondents also indicated that an ideal

Restricted access

Heidi R. Thornton, Jace A. Delaney, Grant M. Duthie and Ben J. Dascombe

effective communication of relevant information. The overall purpose of this review is to provide a methodological outline that may assist team sport practitioners to develop and employ simple and effective feedback for coaches and athletes. An overview of the framework for developing an athlete monitoring

Restricted access

Johan Cassirame, Hervé Sanchez and Jean-Benoit Morin

overall effect of the elevated surface mechanical characteristics on athletes lower limb stiffness and other running mechanics and (2) that this potential effect may differ between athletes, some responding differently than others to the different running surface. Furthermore, anecdotal feedback from high

Restricted access

Vicki Ebbeck

This study examined the sources of information used by adult exercisers to judge performance. Of particular interest was the investigation of gender differences. Subjects, 271 adults (174 males, 97 females) who were enrolled in a university weight training program, completed a questionnaire designed to evaluate the importance of 12 information sources in judging weight training performance: instructor feedback, student feedback, student comparison, changes noticed outside the gym, personal attraction toward the activity, degree of perceived effort exerted in the workout, performance in workout, feedback from others not in the class, goal setting, muscle development, workout improvement over time, and ease in learning new skills. Results revealed a significant discriminant function analysis for gender, with six information sources entering the stepwise procedure: goal setting, student feedback, learning, effort, improvement, and changes noticed outside the gym differentiated the gender groups. Males relied more than females on student feedback as an information source to judge performance. Alternatively, females used effort, goal setting, improvement, and learning as information sources more than males.

Restricted access

Robert J. Vallerand and Greg Reid

The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the psychological processes proposed by cognitive evaluation theory (Deci & Ryan, 1980) when the informational aspect of the situation is salient. More specifically, it was the purpose of this study to determine whether the effects of verbal feedback on intrinsic motivation are mediated by perceived competence. Male undergraduate students (N = 115) participated in a first phase wherein their intrinsic motivation and perceived competence toward an interesting motor task, the stabilometer, was assessed. Subjects (N = 84) who reported at least a moderate level of intrinsic motivation toward the task returned for the second phase of the study in which they were subjected to conditions of either positive, negative, or no verbal feedback of performance. Intrinsic motivation and perceived competence were again assessed. One-way analyses of variance with dependent variables, intrinsic motivation and perceived competence change scores from the first to the second phase, showed that positive feedback increased while negative feedback decreased both intrinsic motivation and perceived competence. Results of a path analysis conducted with verbal feedback, perceived competence, and intrinsic

Restricted access

Sandra A. Stroot and Judith L. Oslin

The purpose of this study was to (a) determine preservice teachers’ ability to use component-specific feedback to influence student performance on the overhand throw and (b) to develop an instrument to record teachers’ verbal behaviors concurrent with student performance. Preservice teachers used a force-production sequence of overhand throw components (Siedentop, Herkowitz, & Rink, 1984) to intervene upon sport-skill performance of elementary age children. Techniques for observing, recording, and accessing overhand throwing performance and the subsequent instructional statements of the preservice teachers were presented, using the sport skill process variable assessment instrument (SSPVA). Analyses of data suggested three major patterns of instructional feedback statements provided by preservice teachers: (a) Preservice teachers often provided feedback on a component that had been consistently demonstrated at a high level of efficiency; (b) some components were not demonstrated at consistently high efficiency levels, yet little or no specific feedback was directed toward these components; and (c) when preservice teachers were able to recognize errors and provide appropriate feedback, change did occur.