Search Results

You are looking at 181 - 190 of 2,755 items for :

  • "competitive" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Frank Nugent, Thomas Comyns, Alan Nevill and Giles D. Warrington

 min 34.57 s for the 1500-m event. However, 26 out of the 32 (81%) Olympic swimming events are competed over a race distance of 200 m or less, for a typical duration of less than 2 min 20 s. Despite the short duration of the majority of swimming events, the traditional training practices of competitive

Restricted access

Tai T. Tran, Lina Lundgren, Josh Secomb, Oliver R.L. Farley, G. Gregory Haff, Laurent B. Seitz, Robert U. Newton, Sophia Nimphius and Jeremy M. Sheppard

Purpose:

To determine whether a previously validated performance-testing protocol for competitive surfers is able to differentiate between Australian elite junior surfers selected (S) to the national team and those not selected (NS).

Methods:

Thirty-two elite male competitive junior surfers were divided into 2 groups (S = 16, NS = 16). Their age, height, body mass, sum of 7 skinfolds, and lean-body-mass ratio (mean ± SD) were 16.17 ± 1.26 y, 173.40 ± 5.30 cm, 62.35 ± 7.40 kg, 41.74 ± 10.82 mm, 1.54 ± 0.35 for the S athletes and 16.13 ± 1.02 y, 170.56 ± 6.6 cm, 61.46 ± 10.10 kg, 49.25 ± 13.04 mm, 1.31 ± 0.30 for the NS athletes. Power (countermovement jump [CMJ]), strength (isometric midthigh pull), 15-m sprint paddling, and 400-m endurance paddling were measured.

Results:

There were significant (P ≤ .05) differences between the S and NS athletes for relative vertical-jump peak force (P = .01, d = 0.9); CMJ height (P = .01, d = 0.9); time to 5-, 10-, and 15-m sprint paddle; sprint paddle peak velocity (P = .03, d = 0.8; PV); time to 400 m (P = .04, d = 0.7); and endurance paddling velocity (P = .05, d = 0.7).

Conclusions:

All performance variables, particularly CMJ height; time to 5-, 10-, and 15-m sprint paddle; sprint paddle PV; time to 400 m; and endurance paddling velocity, can effectively discriminate between S and NS competitive surfers, and this may be important for athlete profiling and training-program design.

Restricted access

Emmanuel Ducrocq, Mark Wilson, Tim J. Smith and Nazanin Derakshan

 al., 2016 for a recent meta-analysis). In line with the predictions of ACT ( Eysenck et al., 2007 ), the QE is also sensitive to the impact of competitive pressure in both self-paced (e.g., golf putting: Vine et al., 2013 ; basketball free-throw shooting: Wilson, Vine, & Wood, 2009 ) and interceptive (e

Restricted access

Alexandra F. DeJong and Jay Hertel

Sensors have been used to detect sport-specific movements 14 , 15 and spatiotemporal changes during a competitive marathon. 16 Thus, significantly more data can be collected in natural environments to determine biomechanical changes during athletic demands. 7 , 14 One such commercially-available sensor

Restricted access

Karine Corrion, Thierry Long, Alan L. Smith and Fabienne d’Arripe-Longueville

This study was designed to assess athletes’ use of moral disengagement in competitive sport. We conducted semistructured interviews with 24 elite male and female athletes in basketball and taekwondo. Participants described transgressive behaviors in competitive situations and reasons for adopting such behaviors. Content analyses revealed that the eight moral disengagement mechanisms identified in everyday Life (i.e., moral justification, advantageous comparison, euphemistic labeling, minimizing or ignoring consequences, attribution of blame, dehumanization, displacement of responsibility, and diffusion of responsibility; Bandura, Barbaranelli, Caprara, & Pastorelli, 1996) were germane in sport. However, the most frequently adopted mechanisms in sport (i.e., displacement and diffusion of responsibility, attribution of blame, minimizing or ignoring consequences, and euphemistic labeling) differed somewhat from those considered most salient in everyday life (i.e., moral justification, advantageous comparison, and euphemistic labeling). Moral disengagement mechanisms linked to projecting fault onto others (“It’s not my fault”) and minimization of transgressions and their consequences (“It’s not serious”) appear to be especially prominent in sport. The findings extend the sport moral disengagement literature by showcasing athlete accounts of moral disengagement.

Restricted access

Dajo Sanders, Grant Abt, Matthijs K.C. Hesselink, Tony Myers and Ibrahim Akubat

Purpose:

To assess the dose-response relationships between different training-load methods and aerobic fitness and performance in competitive road cyclists.

Methods:

Training data from 15 well-trained competitive cyclists were collected during a 10-wk (December–March) preseason training period. Before and after the training period, participants underwent a laboratory incremental exercise test with gas-exchange and lactate measures and a performance assessment using an 8-min time trial (8MT). Internal training load was calculated using Banister TRIMP, Edwards TRIMP, individualized TRIMP (iTRIMP), Lucia TRIMP (luTRIMP), and session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE). External load was measured using Training Stress Score (TSS).

Results:

Large to very large relationships (r = .54–.81) between training load and changes in submaximal fitness variables (power at 2 and 4 mmol/L) were observed for all training-load calculation methods. The strongest relationships with changes in aerobic fitness variables were observed for iTRIMP (r = .81 [95% CI .51–.93, r = .77 [95% CI .43–.92]) and TSS (r = .75 [95% CI .31–.93], r = .79 [95% CI .40–.94]). The strongest dose-response relationships with changes in the 8MT test were observed for iTRIMP (r = .63 [95% CI .17–.86]) and luTRIMP (r = .70 [95% CI .29–.89).

Conclusions:

Training-load quantification methods that integrate individual physiological characteristics have the strongest dose-response relationships, suggesting this to be an essential factor in the quantification of training load in cycling.

Restricted access

Philippe Hellard, Robin Pla, Ferran A. Rodríguez, David Simbana and David B. Pyne

The evaluation of metabolic capacities and their relative contributions to performance in different events informs the training programs for competitive pool swimming, from short (50 m) to long (1500 m) distances. 1 , 2 This evaluation is needed for coaches and sports scientists to more

Restricted access

David Simbaña Escobar, Philippe Hellard, David B. Pyne and Ludovic Seifert

, turns, and finish. The effect of turns and starts on stroking parameters has also been observed during competitive swimming events. 11 – 13 In particular, Veiga and Roig 12 compared the free swimming and underwater speed after the start and turns for the 200 m at the FINA 2013 World Swimming

Restricted access

Jules Woolf, Jess C. Dixon, B. Christine Green and Patrick J. Hill

whether it was just a clash of personalities. While Scott was known for his Type-A personality, Toften could also be stubborn and the competitive environment of college athletics can sometimes lead to this type of blow up. At the same time, Jacobs could not ignore the other resignations and wondered

Restricted access

Ian W. Maynard, Brian Hemmings and Lawrence Warwick-Evans

The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a somatic intervention technique. Subjects (N = 17) completed a modified version of the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory 2 (CSAI-2), which assessed both intensity and direction (debilitative-facilitative) of state anxiety within one hour of a soccer league match. During the match, player performances were evaluated using intraindividual criteria. Subjects were then allocated to control (n = 8) and experimental (n = 9) groups on the basis of their somatic anxiety intensity and direction scores. Following an 8-week intervention, subjects were again assessed during a second soccer match. A series of twoway analyses of variance with one repeated measure revealed significant interactions for cognitive anxiety intensity, somatic anxiety intensity, and somatic anxiety direction. This study provided further support for the “matching hypotheses” in that a compatible treatment proved most effective in reducing the targeted anxiety.