Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 332 items for :

  • "activities" x
  • Sport Business and Sport Management x
Clear All
Restricted access

Jennifer E. Bruening, Rachel M. Madsen, Justin M. Evanovich and Rhema D. Fuller

Service learning and civic engagement have taken on both renewed and increased importance in sport management (Chalip, 2006; Frisby, 2005; Inglis, 2007). The following manuscript represents data collected from 10 offerings of a Sport Management Service Learning course. Ninety-one of the 131 students consented to the use of selected journals, online discussions, and group papers. Analysis was organized around the following a priori themes and subthemes that emerged from the literature: discovery (the increased knowledge of different cultures, reduction of negative stereotypes, and increased self knowledge), integration (the reward of helping others, feeling like you can make a difference, working with others, and connecting to the community), and application (leadership skills and the emotional power of service learning helps students connect intellectually with coursework) (Boyer, 1990; Eyler & Giles, 1999). Subthemes for discovery also emerged from the data and included: knowledge of classmates’ cultures, future plans and being viewed as an expert. A discussion of the findings and recommendations for future research on and application of service learning as a sport management pedagogy follows the results.

Restricted access

Brennan K. Berg, Michael Hutchinson and Carol C. Irwin

This case study illustrates the complexity of decision making in public organizations, specifically highlighting the public health concern of drowning disparities in the United States. Using escalation of commitment theory, students must consider various factors in evaluating the overextended commitments of a local government in a complicated sociopolitical environment and with vital public needs that must be addressed through a local parks and recreation department. Facing a reduction in allocated resources, the department director, Claire Meeks, is tasked with determining which programs will receive higher priority despite the varied feedback from the management staff. To ensure students are provided a realistic scenario, this case offers a combination of fictional and real-life events from Splash Mid-South, an innovative swimming program in Memphis, Tennessee. Students must critically evaluate not only the merits of the swimming program, but the other sport, recreation, and parks programs that also merit an equitable share of the limited resources. Therefore, students are placed in a decision-making role that is common to managers of both public and private organizations. This case study is appropriate for both undergraduate and graduate sport management courses, with specific application to strategic management, organizational behavior, and recreation or leisure topics.

Restricted access

Michael J. Diacin

). Verner, Keyser, and Morrow ( 2005 ) identified two basic categories of experiential learning: discrete and nondiscrete. Discrete activities were identified as those that are self-contained, such as internships and service learning experiences. Nondiscrete activities were identified as components of a

Restricted access

Michael Olejniczak and Thomas J. Aicher

The sponsorship landscape has become increasingly cluttered, making it difficult for brands to stand out amongst ubiquitous sponsors. The National Football League (NFL) and the NFL Super Bowl have exemplified the marketing opportunities, business potential, and sponsorship challenges present in large-scale sporting events. In this case study, we present a fictitious consumer packaged goods beverage company, Staz, and their sponsorship of the NFL Super Bowl. Through the case study, we outline the objectives Staz is attempting to attain through its partnership with the NFL Super Bowl, as well as the activities they employed at national, local and site specific levels. Throughout the case, we present challenges brought on by Staz’s competitors, shortfalls in Staz’s hospitality activities, and the under-utilization of social media during their Super Bowl sponsorship campaign. The reader’s goal is to recognize the activities Staz executed well, while idealizing solutions for the brand’s less effective activation efforts.

Restricted access

Joanne Williams and Heidi M. Parker

Experiential learning has been widely used to impact student engagement and provide opportunities to apply theory to practice (Bower, 2013). Sport management faculty regularly use experiential learning in event management, sales classes and internships (Charlton, 2007; McKelvey & Southall, 2008). In addition, educators often include leadership development within their student learning outcomes (COSMA, 2014; MacKie, 2014). This study examines the effectiveness of leadership development activities implemented in an experiential event management course. A case study approach was selected to demonstrate in-depth development and analysis of the course and the integration of strengths-based leadership activities. Students completed the StrengthFinder assessment (Rath & Conchie, 2009), the Strengths Awareness Measure (Schreiner, 2004), and the Strengths of Self Efficacy Scale (Tsai et al., 2014). Significant increases in strengths awareness were reported along with generally high self-efficacy scores. Students reported positive perceptions of the experiential learning experience and increased levels of engagement.

Restricted access

Margaret Keiper, Dylan Williams and Gil Fried

Fraud is a very broad term, but the underlying theme is the intentional act of deception for personal financial gain. This case study highlights three examples of fraud at different levels of sport: youth, collegiate, and professional. Students are provided a broad perspective of financial fraud and are exposed to differing types of criminal activity at each level of sport. Furthermore, the authors provide an understanding of financial fraud, illegal activities related to fraud, and the responsibilities that all sport management professionals have within various positions at each respective level. Finally, this case provides students with an opportunity to suggest solutions and deterrents for dealing with financial fraud at each level. Specifically, the authors provide a rationale for the use of internal controls within an organization to segregate an organization’s financial responsibilities and reduce the risk of financial fraud.

Restricted access

James E. Johnson

individual learning objectives for this project were focused on the identification of service needs, planning of service activities, experiential service behavior, evaluation of service, and dissemination of service knowledge. These learning objectives were achieved through the execution of service

Restricted access

Tiesha Martin, Stacy Warner and Bhibha Das

Many higher education institutions incorporate service-learning programs because of the positive outcomes they produce for students. However, limited research has assessed the outcomes of service-learning for students working with older adults in a sport setting. Using a discourse analysis approach, this study examined the outcomes of volunteering with the Greenville-Pitt County Senior Games for 55 students enrolled in a physical activity and aging course. The results revealed that students’ perceptions about older adults’ Physical Abilities and Competitiveness and their view of Sport as a Social Event changed as a result of the service-learning experience. Students also cited Humanizing the Older Adult Experience and Learning by Doing as positive outcomes of the experience. The research findings suggest that service-learning with older adults in a sport setting can help better prepare students to serve the aging population. The implications and opportunities for Sport Management instructors are highlighted.

Restricted access

Angela Lumpkin and Rebecca M. Achen

Despite what many claim, just because there is teaching does not mean there is learning. Clear and convincing evidence supports changing the instructional paradigm to a learner-centered classroom. Flipping a class shifts the delivery, often through technologically presented lectures, to free class time for student participation in a plethora of learning activities, such as think-pair-share and discussions, leading to student perceptions of greater learning and more enjoyment. In an action research approach with one class, 72% of juniors and seniors in an undergraduate sport finance and economics class reported out-of-class lectures often positively impacted their learning, and the remaining 28% responded these lectures did sometimes. End-of-course evaluations and surveys were overwhelmingly positive about class engagement, interaction, and enjoyment.

Restricted access

Marijke Taks and Laura Misener

In this case, a local sport tourism officer has been asked to prepare a recommendation for Evex City Council regarding which types of events the city should bid for, based on their public policy agenda of enhancing tourism for economic development purposes and stimulating sport participation for residents. A questionnaire, a codebook, and a data set from two events, an international figure skating event and a provincial gymnastics event, are provided to assist in making a decision. The data set includes the spectators’ identification with and motives for attending the events, tourism activities in which they participated, and some sociodemographic variables. Analyses of the data and interpretation of the results should assist the sport tourism officer in providing accurate recommendations to policymakers. Theories and frameworks that underpin this case include public policy schemas; identity, motives, and tourism behavior of event attendees; sport participation outcomes from sport events; leveraging; and event portfolios.