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Kayla W. Carrigan, Trent A. Petrie and Carlin M. Anderson

Female athletes have been identified as a subpopulation at heightened risk for disordered eating attitudes and behaviors, particularly due to weight pressures in their environment. Using a sample of 414 NCAA Division-I female collegiate athletes, we examined the relations of required team weigh-ins or self-weighing on disordered eating attitudes and behaviors. Through a series of multivariate analyses, we determined that team weighs were significantly unrelated to all outcome measures. Self-weighing, however, differentiated the athletes’ scores on internalization, body satisfaction, dietary restraint, negative affect, and bulimic symptomatology; athletes who self-weighed three or more times a week reported significantly higher levels of pathology across all measures. Mandatory team-conducted weigh-ins appear to not be a salient pressure for female gymnasts and swimmer/divers, although the frequency of their self-weighing may represent a level of self-monitoring that is associated with greater endorsement of disordered eating attitudes and behaviors.

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Vikki Krane, Jennifer Waldron, Jennifer Michalenok and Julie Stiles-Shipley

A feminist cultural studies framework was employed to better understand the relationships among body image, eating, and exercise in female exercisers and athletes. Participants (N=18) engaged in focus group interviews regarding their ideal body image, eating and exercise patterns, and feelings associated with eating and exercising. The athlete interviews also included questions concerning their coach, performance issues, and comfort with their uniforms. Results revealed that most of the women in this study desired an unrealistic ideal body: a toned body with minimal fat. The exercisers emphasized being toned, yet they also avoided too much muscularity. These women constantly were balancing their physical activity and eating: if they exercised, they gave themselves permission to eat and if they ate too much, they punished themselves with exercise. The athletes’ ideal body was dependent upon the social context. Their body satisfaction and concomitant mental states and self-presentation varied depending upon whether the athletes were considering their bodies as athletes or as culturally female.

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Sally Crawford and Robert C. Eklund

Hart, Leary, and Rejeski (1989) hypothesized that social physique anxiety (SPA), self-presentational anxiety associated with the physique, may deter some people from participating in fitness programs. This contention was explored in the present investigation. Data were collected from 104 undergraduate females regarding SPA, weight satisfaction, body satisfaction, and reasons for exercise. Following each of two video presentations of aerobics classes as stimulus materials, attitudes toward the favorability of the exercise settings were assessed. One class wore attire emphasizing the physique; the other appeared in shorts and T-shirts, deemphasizing the physique. Multiple regression analyses revealed SPA was associated with favorability of attitudes toward both exercise settings. SPA was negatively associated with favorability of the setting emphasizing the physique and was positively related to favorability of the setting de-emphasizing the physique. The results indicate that self-presentational, theoretical perspectives may be useful in understanding exercise behavior patterns.

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Megan S. Patterson and Patricia Goodson

Background: Compulsive exercise (CE) is a harmful form of exercise that elevates the risk of developing/sustaining clinical eating disorders. College-aged sorority women are especially prone to CE. Due to the pronounced impact social relationships have on college students’ behavior, this study aims to examine personal networks and CE among a sample of sorority women through an egocentric network analysis. Methods: A total of 204 women in a sorority from a large, private university in the southeastern United States completed a cross-sectional survey in spring 2015. Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted on demographic, attribute, and ego network data. Results: Relationships with siblings, significant others, and roommates were protective against CE in this sample. Conversely, body dissatisfaction and exercise frequency predicted CE. Conclusions: Findings suggest that social relationships can impact CE behaviors in this sample. Along with promoting body satisfaction and healthy exercise, public health efforts should focus on facilitating close interpersonal relationships, especially between sorority women and siblings, significant others, and roommates.

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

adolescent males. BMC Public Health, 18 , 390. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-5319-7 Journal website: https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/ Author website: https://scholars.uow.edu.au/display/stewart_vella Yoga Is Linked to Body Satisfaction Yoga is becoming increasingly popular in the United States and

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Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

Edited by Kim Gammage

fitspiration content focused on males only, these researchers examined how men’s fitspiration consumption relates to body satisfaction and exercise motivation, indirectly through muscular-ideal internalization and appearance comparison tendency. Using a cross-sectional design, a sample of 118 male college

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Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Richard F. MacLehose, Allison W. Watts, Marla E. Eisenberg, Melissa N. Laska and Nicole Larson

 years later: is it bad for overweight girls to like their bodies? J Adolesc Health . 2007 ; 41 ( 4 ): 415 – 417 . PubMed doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.001 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2007.06.001 13. Loth KA , Watts AW , van den Berg P , Neumark-Sztainer D . Does body satisfaction help or harm

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Sheryl Miller and Mary Fry

 al., 2013 ; Strelan & Hargreaves, 2005 ), which may contribute to the already decreased body satisfaction many college goers’ experience. Therefore, fitness professionals would benefit from better understanding how to foster college students’ engagement in regular physical activity for health

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Hayley Perelman, Joanna Buscemi, Elizabeth Dougherty and Alissa Haedt-Matt

, whereas academic eligibility requirements are set by each Division III school ( Varnes et al., 2013 ). In general, research has found that athletes at lower division levels (e.g., Division III) experience greater body satisfaction than non-athletes ( DiBartolo & Shaffer, 2002 ; Varnes et al., 2013

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Kim Gammage, Rachel Arnold, Nicole Bolter, Lori Dithurbide, Karl Erickson, Blair Evans, Larkin Lamarche, Sean Locke, Eric Martin and Kathleen Wilson

more effective. Mulgrew, K.E., McCulloch, K., Farren, E., Prichard, I., & Lim, M.S. (2018). This girl can #jointhemovement: Effectiveness of physical functionality-focused campaigns for women’s body satisfaction and exercise intent. Body Image, 24 , 26–35. doi: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2017.11.007 Journal