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Maureen R. Weiss and Becky L. Sisley

The present study examined the problem of coaching attrition in youth sports by asking former coaches why they quit. Also, dropout and current coaches were compared on demographic characteristics, coaching orientations, self-ratings of coaching abilities, and attitudes toward program policies. Current (n = 159) and dropout (n = 97) coaches associated with a youth sports agency responded to a background questionnaire and a coaching orientations and preferred outcomes questionnaire. Dropout coaches also completed a questionnaire to assess the reasons why they quite coaching. Multiple reasons were cited: time involvement, conflicts with job, child no longer participating, loss of motivation, problems with unqualified officiating, and dissatisfaction with program philosophy. Current and dropout coaches were similar on demographic characteristics and coaching orientations but differed on preferred coaching outcomes. Recommendations for retaining youth coaches, and thus coaching continuity for the kids, included enhancing the quality of officiating, providing coaching clinics, and soliciting input from coaches and parents regarding program philosophy and policies.

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Bettina Callary, Abbe Brady, Cameron Kiosoglous, Pekka Clewer, Rui Resende, Tammy Mehrtens, Matthew Wilkie and Rita Horvath

Coach developers (CDs) are individuals who develop, support, and challenge coaches in their ongoing efforts to improve knowledge and skills for athletes; thus, CDs have an impact on positive and effective quality sport experiences ( International Council for Coaching Excellence, 2014 ). The Nippon

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Beth G. Clarkson, Elwyn Cox and Richard C. Thelwell

Background In stark contrast to a significant growth in women’s participation in football (soccer) over the past 20 years, such growth is not reflected in the number of women coaches at all levels of expertise ( Williams, 2013 ). Recent reports indicate that 80% of coaching positions in European

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Anthony Koschmann

Coaches play an instrumental role in helping their players to play to the best of their abilities as a team to win. Professional hockey coaches, for instance, decide which players will play on which lines, strategizing the matchups against opposing players, and create special team assignments

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Susan M. Molstad

Male (N=121) and female (N=135) high school girls’ basketball coaches responded to three forced-choice questions related to gender and role modeling. Both genders said they preferred coaching girls to boys. Male coaches thought female athletes preferred a male coach, female coaches thought they preferred a female coach. Coaches of each gender perceived themselves as equal or better role models than their counterparts. Coaches were then asked to rank order the importance of six coaching qualities previously identified as either expressive or instrumental. First they ranked the qualities in importance as they perceived them, then in the order they thought players would rank them. Coaches differed significantly by gender on the rankings of the qualities, as well as their perceptions of how athletes might rank the same qualities. Implications for modeling and young female athletes are discussed in relation to gender differences in these perceptions.

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Shaina M. Dabbs, Jeffrey A. Graham and Marlene A. Dixon

coaches. Workforce and Career Trends: A Focus on Midcareer Experiences Three notable trends contribute to the complexity of managing today’s workforce. First, the workforce overall is aging. Since 2001, the teenage workforce decreased by 33%, whereas employees aged 55 years and older increased by 40

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Jeffrey A. Graham and Marlene A. Dixon

, suggesting that if individuals are not physically and emotionally invested in the organization, they are in some way letting the “family” down. Furthermore, there is little job security for coaches in sport, as contracts can and often are terminated mid- or postseason. These pressures produce a culture that

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Kari Stefansen, Gerd Marie Solstad, Åse Strandbu and Maria Hansen

In this paper, we explore coach-athlete sexual relationships (CASRs) from the perspective of young athletes, with the aim of adding to the evolving research on CASRs as a contested social phenomenon. Our starting point is what we see as two conflicting images of such relationships in contemporary

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Leslee A. Fisher

Kennedy (a pseudonym) is a USA National Governing Body President who is committed to female student-athlete welfare and advocacy. Kennedy recently contracted with Skyler (also a pseudonym)—a coach educator—to develop coach education modules to ensure that coaches in the organization are providing

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Leanne Norman

This study centers upon accounts of master women coaches in the UK, connecting the participants’ experiences of the structural practices within the coaching profession to their feelings of being undervalued and marginalized. By going beyond previous positivist and interpretive approaches to the issue of women coaches’ underrepresentation, I locate the participants’ narratives and their oppression within the wider sociocultural context of sport. The strength of patriarchy within sport and coaching is revealed in the private lives of the coaches. Consequently, the findings provoke methodological and theoretical implications for an alternative approach to understanding women’s long standing minority status within sports leadership.