Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 72 items for :

  • "core stability" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Barton E. Anderson and Kellie C. Huxel Bliven

Clinical Scenario:

Research has shown a link between poor core stability and chronic, nonspecific low back pain, with data to suggest that alterations in core muscle activation patterns, breathing patterns, lung function, and diaphragm mechanics may occur. Traditional treatment approaches for chronic, nonspecific low back pain focus on exercise and manual therapy interventions, however it is not clear whether breathing exercises are effective in treating back pain.

Focused Clinical Question:

In adults with chronic, nonspecific low back pain, are breathing exercises effective in reducing pain, improving respiratory function, and/or health related quality of life?

Summary of Key Findings:

Following a literature search, 3 studies were identified for inclusion in the review. All reviewed studies were critically appraised at level 2 evidence and reported improvements in either low back pain or quality of life following breathing program intervention.

Clinical Bottom Line:

Exercise programs were shown to be effective in improving lung function, reducing back pain, and improving quality of life. Breathing program frequencies ranged from daily to 2–3 times per week, with durations ranging from 4 to 8 weeks. Based on these results, athletic trainers and physical therapists caring for patients with chronic, nonspecific low back pain should consider the inclusion of breathing exercises for the treatment of back pain when such treatments align with the clinician’s own judgment and clinical expertise and the patient’s preferences and values.

Strength of Recommendation:

Grade B evidence exists to support the use of breathing exercises in the treatment of chronic, nonspecific low back pain.

Restricted access

Barry Braun, Nancy I. Williams, Carol Ewing Garber and Matthew Hickey

As the discipline of kinesiology ponders what should compose a kinesiology curriculum, it is worth considering the broad context. What is our responsibility to imbue students with values, viewpoint, and a vocabulary that facilitates their success in a context greater than our discipline? How do we decide what those things are (e.g., professional integrity, analytical thinking, cultural understanding, social responsibility, problem solving, leadership and engaged citizenship, effective communication, working collaboratively, preparation for lifelong learning)? How do we create a curriculum that provides sufficient understanding of disciplinary knowledge and critically important foundational skills? The purpose of this paper is to provide a jumping-off point for deeper discussion of what our students need most and how we can deliver it.

Restricted access

Gabrielle G. Gilmer, Jessica K. Washington, Jeffrey R. Dugas, James R. Andrews and Gretchen D. Oliver

role of preseason strength and range of motion . Am J Sports Med . 2014 ; 42 ( 8 ): 1993 – 1999 . PubMed ID: 24893778 doi:10.1177/0363546514535070 10.1177/0363546514535070 24893778 6. Kibler WB , Press J , Sciascia A . The role of core stability in athletic function . Sports Med . 2006

Restricted access

Valeria Rosso, Laura Gastaldi, Walter Rapp, Stefan Lindinger, Yves Vanlandewijck, Sami Äyrämö and Vesa Linnamo

providing core stability: Implications for measurement and training . Sports Medicine, 38 ( 11 ), 893 – 916 . PubMed ID: 18937521 doi:10.2165/00007256-200838110-00002 10.2165/00007256-200838110-00002 Cavanagh , P. , & Komi , P. ( 1979 ). Electromechanical delay in human skeletal muscle under

Restricted access

Michelle A. Sandrey and Jonathan G. Mitzel

Context:

Core training specifically for track and field athletes is vague, and it is not clear how it affects dynamic balance and core-endurance measures.

Objective:

To determine the effects of a 6-week core-stabilization-training program for high school track and field athletes on dynamic balance and core endurance.

Design:

Test–retest.

Setting:

High school in north central West Virginia.

Participants:

Thirteen healthy high school student athletes from 1 track and field team volunteered for the study.

Interventions:

Subjects completed pretesting 1 wk before data collection. They completed a 6-wk core-stabilization program designed specifically for track and field athletes. The program consisted of 3 levels with 6 exercises per level and lasted for 30 min each session 3 times per week. Subjects progressed to the next level at 2-wk intervals. After 6 wk, posttesting was conducted

Main Outcome Measures:

The subjects were evaluated using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) for posteromedial (PM), medial (M), and anteromedial (AM) directions; abdominal-fatigue test (AFT); back-extensor test (BET); and side-bridge test (SBT) for the right and left sides.

Results:

Posttest results significantly improved for all 3 directions of the SEBT (PM, M, and AM), AFT, BET, right SBT, and left SBT. Effect size was large for all variables except for PM and AM, where a moderate effect was noted. Minimal-detectable-change scores exceeded the error of the measurements for all dependent variables.

Conclusion:

After the 6-wk core-stabilization-training program, measures of the SEBT, AFT, BET, and SBT improved, thus advocating the use of this core-stabilization-training program for track and field athletes.

Open access

Erica M. Willadsen, Andrea B. Zahn and Chris J. Durall

control can be altered with training. A variety of training approaches have been adopted in ACL prevention programs, including neuromuscular control training, core stability training, balance training, and plyometric exercise. A common goal of these prevention programs is to reduce knee valgus and

Restricted access

Andrea Biscarini, Samuele Contemori and Giuditta Grolla

Swiss ball, 26 side plank with forearm on Bosu ball, 26 supine bridge with feet on Bosu or Swiss ball, 26 crunch with back on Swiss ball, 27 , 28 etc), or arranging Bosu balls and inflatable discs to support the entire body. 27 To our knowledge, no study to date has analyzed core-stability

Restricted access

Ralf Roth, Lars Donath, Lukas Zahner and Oliver Faude

For performance and injury prevention in sport, core strength and endurance are focused prerequisites. Therefore we evaluated characteristics of trunk muscle activation and performance during strength-endurance related trunk field tests. Strength-endurance ability, as total time to failure, and activation of trunk muscles was measured in 39 football players of the highest German female football league (Bundesliga) (N = 18, age: 20.7 y [SD 4.4]) and the highest national male under-19 league (N = 21, age: 17.9 y [0.7]) in prone plank, side plank, and dorsal position. Maximal isometric force was assessed during trunk extension and flexion, rotation, and lateral flexion to normalize EMG and to compare with the results of strength-endurance tests. For all positions of endurance strength tests, a continuous increase in normalized EMG activation was observed (P < .001). Muscle activation of the rectus abdominis and external oblique in prone plank position exceeded the maximal voluntary isometric contraction activation, with a significantly higher activation in females (P = .02). We conclude, that in the applied strength-endurance testing, the activation of trunk muscles was high, especially in females. As high trunk muscle activation can infer fatigue, limb strength can limit performance in prone and side plank position, particularly during high trunk muscle activation.

Restricted access

Eric J. Drinkwater, Erica J. Pritchett and David G. Behm

Context:

Resistance training while using an instability-training device is known to increase activation of stabilizing muscle groups while decreasing the force generated by the prime movers during isometric contractions.

Purpose:

To investigate differences in squat kinetics during dynamic resistance training in an increasingly unstable training environment.

Methods:

Fourteen active men participated in this study. In each testing session, each participant performed 3 repetitions of squats with a 10-repetition maximum (10-RM) resistance, 40% of their 10-RM resistance, and 20.45 kg. The 3 testing session consisted of standing on a stable foor, foam pads, or BOSU balls. All repetitions were recorded with an optical encoder to record barbell kinetics.

Results:

The transition from stable (floor) to very unstable (BOSU) resulted in high likelihoods (>75%) of clinically meaningful differences ranging from small to large (effect size [ES] 0.31–1.73) in factors relating to concentric kinetics, eccentric power, and squat depth, regardless of the resistance used for training. There were also likely differences at the heaviest resistance in peak concentric power (stable to foam: ES 2.06; foam to BOSU: ES 0.38), eccentric power (stable to foam: ES 1.88; foam to BOSU: ES 0.74), and squat depth (stable to foam: ES 0.50; foam to BOSU: ES 0.67).

Conclusions:

Resistance training in an unstable environment at an intensity sufficient to elicit strength gains of the prime movers results in deleterious effects in concentric squat kinetics and squat technique. Such observations are particularly evident on very unstable platforms.