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Douglas J. Casa, Yuri Hosokawa, Luke N. Belval, William M. Adams and Rebecca L. Stearns

Exertional heat stroke (EHS) is among the leading causes of sudden death during sport and physical activity. However, previous research has shown that EHS is 100% survivable when rapidly recognized and appropriate treatment is provided. Establishing policies to address issues related to the prevention and treatment of EHS, including heat acclimatization, environment-based activity modification, body temperature assessment using rectal thermometry, and immediate, onsite treatment using cold-water immersion attenuates the risk of EHS mortality and morbidity. This article provides an overview of the current evidence regarding EHS prevention and management. The transfer of scientific knowledge to clinical practice has shown great success for saving EHS patients. Further efforts are needed to implement evidence-based policies to not only mitigate EHS fatality but also to reduce the overall incidence of EHS.

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John Harris

Ray Gravell first achieved fame as a member of the great Welsh rugby team of the 1970s. After his playing career was over he moved into the national media, working as an actor and a broadcaster. This article examines obituaries and other newspaper accounts after the death of Gravell and the ways in which celebrity is consumed and (re)presented. It looks at cultures of commemoration in both the mourning and the celebration of this figure and analyzes how the past and the present are (re)presented in a complex interplay of imagining the nation. In an analysis informed by social identities research it explores Gravell’s symbolic significance and positions him as the last Prince of Wales.

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Hans C. Rasmussen

raquette among whites died out in the early 1880s. While Yankees knew of the relatively young sport of lacrosse, the only game they knew of by the name of “racket” was racquetball. 31 The Negligible Modernization and Fitful Death of Raquette in New Orleans An imaginative newspaperman once told the story of

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Amanda Cosgrove and Toni Bruce

In the face of growing scholarly concern about whiteness, and following Denzin’s (1996) argument that “those who control the media control a society’s discourses about itself” (p. 319), it becomes vital to interrogate and map what is at stake in specific representations of whiteness that gain purchase and mobilize the nation in shared ways. In death, America’s Cup sailor and adventurer Sir Peter Blake was held up as a New Zealand hero representative of a “true” national character. We argue that in the context of marked changes in the racial, political, and economic landscape of New Zealand, Blake’s unexpected death represented an important moment in the symbolic (re)production of historically dominant but increasingly contested notions of national character that are synonymous with white masculinity. We conclude that, as long as the centrality of whiteness is under threat, we are likely to see the ongoing rearticulation of nostalgic visions of nationalism.

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Thomas Terrell, John Pitt and Irfan Asif

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Robert L. Kronisch

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Julianna Shappy

Edited by Lindsey E. Eberman

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Column-editor : Robert I. Moss

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Jaime Schultz, W. Larry Kenney and Andrew D. Linden

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Malissa Martin, Suzanne M. Higgins, Eileen B. Radovan and Rachel P. Streff