Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 60 items for :

  • "family support" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Dan J. Graham, Katherine W. Bauer, Sarah Friend, Daheia J. Barr-Anderson and Dianne Nuemark-Sztainer

Background:

Physical activity (PA) declines sharply and rapidly during adolescence, especially among girls, posing a risk for inactivity and obesity in adulthood. This study identified personal, behavioral, and socioenvironmental correlates of concurrent and 6-month longitudinal PA among adolescent girls.

Methods:

Data were gathered from 356 adolescent girls (mean age 15.8 ± 1.2 years; > 75% racial/ethnic minorities) in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area in 2007–2009. Linear regression analyses controlling for age, race/ethnicity, and school were conducted predicting baseline and follow-up levels of total PA and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) assessed via 3-Day Physical Activity Recall. Models were fit for each correlate individually and for all correlates together, mutually adjusted.

Results:

For concurrent PA, significant positive predictors when adjusting for the influence of all other variables included self-efficacy, support from friends and teachers, and friends’ PA. Total screen time and distance from school to PA resources related inversely to concurrent PA. In mutually-adjusted models, 6-month PA was positively related to self-worth, family support, and parent PA and inversely related to total screen time.

Conclusions:

PA interventions with adolescent girls might be enhanced by involving adolescents’ social networks and also by helping adolescents feel better about their self-worth and athletic abilities.

Restricted access

Makoto Chogahara, Sandra O’Brien Cousins and Leonard M. Wankel

The interpersonal relationships of older adults have long been recognized as important determinants for their physical activity involvement. To date, researchers in this field have tended to focus on positive social influences, such as social support. Furthermore, in most studies, operational definitions of social support have stressed the source of the support (e.g., family support and friend support) rather than the nature of the support provided by these groups and individuals. In order to clarify the social context of physical activity among older adults, more attention should be paid to exploring both positive and negative social influences on physical activity. The objectives of this paper were to consolidate current findings concerning social influences and physical activity among aging adults, and to identify major positive and negative social influences from the literature that are associated with physical activity and health-promoting behaviors among aging adults. The development of a more comprehensive and representative method of measuring social influences in physical activity settings is advocated.

Restricted access

Inacio Crochemore Mohnsam da Silva, Mario Renato Azevedo and Helen Gonçalves

Objective:

To explore the association between family and friends’ social support and leisure-time physical activity (PA) in adults.

Methods:

Cross-sectional population-based study, conducted in Pelotas, Brazil. Leisure-time PA was measured with the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Those who reported PA practice ≥ 150 minutes on the week before the interview were considered active. Social support was evaluated through the Social Support Scale for PA and classified according to the type of PA. For analyzing the association between social support and PA, Poisson regression model was used. Analyses were stratified by sex and interactions with socioeconomic level and age were explored.

Results:

Men and women who received social support from family and friends simultaneously were about 3 times more active than their counterparts. Friends’ social support presented, in all analyses, stronger associations with PA than family support. Interactions with socioeconomic level and age were observed.

Conclusion:

Interventions targeting individuals and their social environment are likely to have greater effectiveness than those targeted on one of these aspects only.

Restricted access

Charlotte Louise Edwardson, Trish Gorely, Natalie Pearson and Andrew Atkin

Background:

To progress physical activity (PA) social support research using objective measures of PA, attention should be turned to specific segments of the day (eg, after school or weekends) in which young people spend the majority of their time with parents or friends. Furthermore, the majority of previous research has focused on the influence of parents and peers. The current study examined gender and age differences in 5 sources of activity-related social support and their relationship with objectively measured after-school and weekend PA among adolescents.

Methods:

328 adolescents aged 12–16 years (57% boys) wore an accelerometer for 7 days and completed a questionnaire assessing support for PA. After-school and weekend PA were extracted.

Results:

Adolescents perceived more support from their peers compared with other sources and boys perceived more peer support than girls. Younger adolescents perceived greater amounts of family support and explicit modeling from both mother and father; however, logistic support appeared constant throughout adolescence. After controlling for gender and age, peer support was a significant influence on after-school MVPA.

Conclusions:

Findings suggest that there may be benefit in encouraging adolescents to participate in PA in the after-school period with their peers.

Restricted access

Kate L. Pumpa, Sharon M. Madigan, Ruth E. Wood-Martin, Richelle Flanagan and Noreen Roche

The use of sport supplements presents a dilemma for many of those involved in supporting athletes, including coaches, families, support staff, and the athletes themselves. Often the information that they source can be incorrect and promote a biased view regarding the use of nutritional supplements. The aim of this case study was to describe the process that occurred around the development of a series of targeted educational fact sheets on a range of nutritional supplements for Irish athletes. It describes the initiation and support of the process by the Irish Sports Council; one of its subgroups, the Food and Food Supplements Committee; and the Irish Institute of Sport. A needs assessment through questionnaires was carried out to establish the most commonly used sport nutrition supplements by athletes age 16 or over in Ireland. Respondents completed 105 questionnaires over a 4-mo period in 2008–09 that led to the production of 20 supplement fact sheets. These supplement fact sheets will enable Irish athletes to access high-quality, up-to-date, scientific information about the supplements they have reported consuming. Since personal reading had a strong influence over athletes’ decision-making process for taking nutritional supplements, as did scientific research, fact sheets available on the Internet from a reliable source are an ideal way to educate Irish athletes.

Restricted access

Wendell C. Taylor, James F. Sallis, Marsha Dowda, Patty S. Freedson, Karen Eason and Russell R. Pate

The purposes of the study were to assess differences in physical activity levels and correlates of physical activity among overweight (‡ 85 th percentile of body mass index for their sex and age) and non-overweight (< 85th percentile) youth. The sample included 509 seventh through twelfth graders. Activity was measured by a 7-day, 46-item activity checklist. Overweight girls were more sedentary than non-overweight girls (p < .03), and non-overweight girls engaged in more vigorous physical activity than overweight girls (p < .03). For boys, there were no significant differences in activity. The regression analyses for vigorous activity yielded the largest total R2’s (R2 = .49 for overweight and R2 = .27 for non-overweight.) The significant factor for overweight youth was greater athletic coordination (p < .01). For non-overweight youth, the significant factors were greater family support (p < .05), greater peer support (p < .001), fewer barriers (p < .03), and greater athletic coordination (p < .01). Correlates of physical activity vary by weight status of young people.

Open access

Hannah Wilkie, Martyn Standage, Lauren Sherar, Sean Cumming, Caley Parnell, Adrian Davis, Charlie Foster and Russ Jago

Background:

Regular physical activity improves physical and mental health, yet children’s physical activity levels were low in England’s 2014 Report Card. Within this paper, we update the 2014 Report Card to assess current information for the 9 indicators of physical activity.

Methods:

A search for nationally representative data on 9 indicators of physical activity was conducted and the data were assessed by an expert panel. The panel assigned grades [ie, A, B, C, D, F, or INC (incomplete)] to each indicator based on whether children across England were achieving specific benchmarks. The 2016 Report Card was produced and disseminated.

Results:

The following grades were awarded: Overall Physical Activity Levels: D-; Organized Sport Participation: D; Active Play: INC; Active Transportation: C-; Sedentary Behaviors: INC; Family and Peers: INC; School: B+; Community and the Built Environment: B; Government Strategies and Investment: INC.

Conclusions:

The grades have not improved since the 2014 Report Card and several gaps in the literature are still present. While children’s physical activity levels remain low alongside competing sedentary choices, further national plans and investment with local actions are urgently needed to promote physical activity especially via active play, active transport, and family support.

Restricted access

Kerem Shuval, Eyal Weissblueth, Mayer Brezis, Adan Araida and Loretta DiPietro

Background:

Ample research has assessed correlates of physical activity (PA) among college students; however, socioenvironmental correlates of PA have not been assessed in Arab and Jewish Israeli college students.

Methods:

Cross-sectional study of 198 Arab and Jewish physical education college students. The dependent variable was meeting the CDC/ACSM guidelines for moderate/vigorous PA. Independent variables consisted of individual variables (eg, ethnicity, gender, religious observance) and socioenvironmental variables (eg, street lighting, family support, exercise facilities). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used.

Results:

Thirty-three percent of the students met the recommended guidelines for PA. Individual variables were more highly correlated with PA than socioenvironmental variables. In the final logistic-regression model 3 individual covariates independently predicted PA: gender, race/ethnicity, and self-efficacy. Access to open space was the only environmental variable significantly correlated with PA.

Conclusions:

The results underscore the need to implement an intervention program aimed at promoting the recommended levels of PA among Arab and Jewish Israeli physical education college students, while tailoring the intervention to individual risk markers for physical inactivity (eg, race/ethnicity, gender).

Restricted access

Sarah E. Roth, Monique Gill, Alec M. Chan-Golston, Lindsay N. Rice, Catherine M. Crespi, Deborah Koniak-Griffin and Michael L. Prelip

61.8 55.9 65.7 55.1 50.1 58.3 Covariates  Female 52.6 51.2 53.5 49.6 49.8 49.4  Latinx 65.6 71.8 64.8 69.1 76.1 63.7  High family support 30.4 32.5 29.0 19.6 20.5 18.9  High friend support 16.2 16.1 16.3 35.0 36.1 34.2  High barriers 27.9 28.0 27.8 27.1 26.3 27.6  High benefits 69.4 69.5 69.4 72.3 72

Restricted access

Marissa A. Kobayashi, Tae Kyoung Lee, Rafael O. Leite, Blanca Noriega Esquives, Guillermo Prado, Sarah E. Messiah and Sara M. St. George

support. 21 Among Hispanics, parental support has been shown to buffer against the effects of acculturative stress on anxiety and depressive symptoms in children. 22 Family support and high familism have also been found to offset the negative outcomes of stress, specifically low self-esteem and poor