Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 277 items for :

  • "global positioning systems" x
Clear All
Restricted access

Nacho Torreño, Diego Munguía-Izquierdo, Aaron Coutts, Eduardo Sáez de Villarreal, Jose Asian-Clemente and Luis Suarez-Arrones

Purpose:

To analyze the match running profile, distance traveled over successive 15 min of match play, heart rates (HRs), and index of performance efficiency (effindex) of professional soccer players with a global positioning system (GPS) and HR in official competition.

Methods:

Twenty-six professional players were investigated during full matches in competitive club-level matches (N = 223). Time–motion data and HR were collected using GPS and HR technology.

Results:

The relative total distance was 113 ± 11 m/min, with substantial differences between halves. For all playing positions, a substantial decrease in total distance and distance covered at >13.0 km/h was observed in the second half in comparison with the first. The decrease during the second half in distance covered at >13.0 km/h was substantially higher than in total distance. The average HR recorded was 86.0% maximal HR, and the relationship between external and internal load (effindex) was 1.3, with substantial differences between halves in all playing positions, except strikers for effindex. Wide midfielders reflected substantially the lowest mean HR and highest effindex, whereas center backs showed substantially the lowest effindex of all playing positions.

Conclusions:

The current study confirmed the decrement in a player’s performance toward the end of a match in all playing positions. Wide midfielders displayed the highest and fittest levels of physical and physiological demands, respectively, whereas center backs had the lowest and least-fit levels of physical and physiological demands, respectively. The position-specific relationship between external and internal load confirms that players with more overall running performance during the full match were the best in effindex.

Restricted access

Tannath J. Scott, Heidi R. Thornton, Macfarlane T.U. Scott, Ben J. Dascombe and Grant M. Duthie

Advancements in technology have led to the extensive implementation of global positioning systems (GPS) and microtechnology in team sports to quantify movement demands. The ability to more reliably quantify and interpret these demands has led to a greater understanding of the external loads

Restricted access

Mark Waldron, Jamie Highton and Craig Twist

Purpose:

This study assessed the reliability of a rugby league movement-simulation protocol, relative to interchanged players (RLMSP-i).

Methods:

Fifteen male participants completed 2 trials of the RLMSP-i, separated by 1 wk. The RLMSP-i comprised low- to moderate-intensity running, interspersed by high-intensity sprinting and tackling activity, based on global positioning system (GPS) data recorded during Super League performances.

Results:

The lowest coefficient of variation (CV ± 95% CI) was observed for total m/min during both interchange bout 1 (1.1% ± 0.2%) and bout 2 (1.0% ± 0.2%). The percentage of heart rate peak and ratings of perceived exertion demonstrated CVs of 1.2–2.0% and 2.9–3.5%, respectively. The poorest agreement between trials was found for blood lactate concentration (16.2% ± 2.8%). In no case was the CV smaller than the smallest worthwhile change, yet in every case the moderate changes were larger than the CV.

Conclusions:

The RLMSP-i’s reliability is sufficient to enable the detection of moderate changes in various performance and physiological measurements that accurately simulate some, but not all, aspects of rugby league matches.

Restricted access

Catherine Mason and Matt Greig

segmental forces, 8 but these methods offer limited ecological validity. Contemporary means of quantifying lumbar spine loading is provided by applications in global positioning system (GPS) technology, which enable measurement in the clinical or sporting context. Typical GPS analysis metrics include

Restricted access

Dave H.H. Van Kann, Sanne I. de Vries, Jasper Schipperijn, Nanne K. de Vries, Maria W.J. Jansen and Stef P.J. Kremers

encouraging PA. The use of global positioning system (GPS) data in addition to accelerometer data has been advocated in health behavior studies in order to enrich data with location-specific information, 31 allowing researchers to more accurately specify the use of physical environments in relation to PA and

Restricted access

Adam Jones, Chris Brogden, Richard Page, Ben Langley and Matt Greig

causal effect in the field given the complexity of lower-extremity injury mechanics and the relative lack of ecological validity in laboratory trials. Contemporary developments in the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) integrated within global positioning system (GPS) technology provide an in vivo

Restricted access

Mark Waldron, Jamie Highton, Matthew Daniels and Craig Twist

Purpose:

This study aimed to quantify changes in heart rate (HR) and movement speeds in interchanged and whole-match players during 35 elite rugby league performances.

Methods:

Performances were separated into whole match, interchange bout 1, and interchange bout 2 and further subdivided into match quartiles. Mean percentages of peak HR (%HRpeak) and total and high-intensity running (> 14 km/h) meters per minute (m/min) were recorded.

Results:

For whole-match players, a decline in high-intensity m/min and %HRpeak was observed between successive quartiles (P < .05). High-intensity m/min during interchange 1 also progressively declined, although initial m/min was higher than whole match (24.2 ± 7.9 m/min vs 18.3 ± 4.7 m/min, P = .018), and %HRpeak did not change over match quartiles (P > .05). During interchange 2, there was a decline in high-intensity m/min from quartile 1 to quartile 3 (18 ± 4.1 vs 13.4 ± 5 m/min, P = .048) before increasing in quartile 4. Quartiles 1 and 2 also showed an increase in %HRpeak (85.2 ± 6.5 vs 87.3 ± 4.2%, P = .022).

Conclusions:

Replacement players adopted a high initial intensity in their first match quartile before a severe decline thereafter. However, in a second bout, lower exercise intensity at the outset enabled a higher physiological exertion for later periods. These findings inform interchange strategy and conditioning for coaches while also providing preliminary evidence of pacing in team sport.

Restricted access

Matthew Pearce, David H. Saunders, Peter Allison and Anthony P. Turner

. 17 By dividing adolescent leisure-time physical activity into context-based dimensions and combining data from global positioning system (GPS) receivers, diaries, and accelerometers, it may be possible to more accurately characterize the specific contexts where MVPA occurs. Consistent with an

Restricted access

Matt Greig, Hannah Emmerson and John McCreadie

Global Positioning System (GPS) technology offer potential to quantify mechanical loading during functional rehabilitative tasks. Recently, mediolateral loading imbalances were highlighted in a case study of ankle sprain injury in elite male soccer. 11 However, to enhance the clinical application of GPS

Restricted access

James J. Malone, Arne Jaspers, Werner Helsen, Brenda Merks, Wouter G.P. Frencken and Michel S. Brink

) and the in-season period (39 wk). The GK trained on average of 5 times per week during preseason and 4.2 times per week during in-season, respectively. The GK wore a global positioning system (GPS) device (firmware version 717, OptimEye G5; Catapult Sports, Melbourne, Australia), which has shown