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Carley O’Neill and Shilpa Dogra

aerobic activity has been shown to improve anxiety sensitivity and fear of anxiety-related physiological sensations among those with elevated anxiety sensitivity. 9 Less is known about the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on anxiety sensitivity, particularly among those with asthma

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José D. Jiménez-García, Fidel Hita-Contreras, Manuel de la Torre-Cruz, Raquel Fábrega-Cuadros, Agustín Aibar-Almazán, David Cruz-Díaz and Antonio Martínez-Amat

intrinsic risk factors ( Nemoto, Gen-no, Masuki, Okazaki, & Nose, 2007 ). One of the main barriers to the habitual practice of physical exercise in adults is “the lack of time” ( Stutts, 2002 ). With this in mind, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) was developed with low-volume exercises. Furthermore

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Christopher J. Keating, Juan  Á. Párraga Montilla, Pedro Á. Latorre Román and Rafael Moreno del Castillo

-intensity exercise. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is an exercise regimen that seems to be gaining more popularity in the general population as a quick and effective, yet enjoyable, way to partake in physical activity. High-intensity interval training, just like MICT, can take place in many different forms

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Abby R. Fleming, Nic Martinez, Larry H. Collins, Candi D. Ashley, Maureen Chiodini, Brian J. Waddell and Marcus W. Kilpatrick

Medicine, 2018 ). One specific approach to improving health and fitness through exercise that has received considerable attention in the literature, and among the general population, is high-intensity interval training (HIIT), which incorporates repeated bursts of intense aerobic exercise with periods of

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Milos Mallol, David J. Bentley, Lynda Norton, Kevin Norton, Gaizka Mejuto and Javier Yanci

effects of short periods of intensified, or high-intensity interval training (HIIT), in athletes have become popular and underpinned by research studies showing it to be an effective method of training, 1 , 4 , 5 although not in all studies. 6 HIIT is a training method structured as repeated bouts

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Matteo Bonato, Antonio La Torre, Marina Saresella, Ivana Marventano, Giampiero Merati, Giuseppe Banfi and Jacopo A. Vitale

Soccer is one of the world’s most widely played sports. As aerobic conditioning is essential for developing the physical capacity that players need to perform well, 1 it is an integral part of soccer training programs. 2 High-intensity interval training (HIIT) 3 and small-sided games (SSGs) 4

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Shaea A. Alkahtani, Nuala M. Byrne, Andrew P. Hills and Neil A. King

Purpose:

Compensatory responses may attenuate the effectiveness of exercise training in weight management. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of moderate- and high-intensity interval training on eating behavior compensation.

Methods:

Using a crossover design, 10 overweight and obese men participated in 4-week moderate (MIIT) and high (HIIT) intensity interval training. MIIT consisted of 5-min cycling stages at ±20% of mechanical work at 45%VO2peak, and HIIT consisted of alternate 30-s work at 90%VO2peak and 30-s rests, for 30 to 45 min. Assessments included a constant-load exercise test at 45%VO2peak for 45 min followed by 60-min recovery. Appetite sensations were measured during the exercise test using a Visual Analog Scale. Food preferences (liking and wanting) were assessed using a computer-based paradigm, and this paradigm uses 20 photographic food stimuli varying along two dimensions, fat (high or low) and taste (sweet or nonsweet). An ad libitum test meal was provided after the constant-load exercise test.

Results:

Exerciseinduced hunger and desire to eat decreased after HIIT, and the difference between MIIT and HIIT in desire to eat approached significance (p = .07). Exercise-induced liking for high-fat nonsweet food tended to increase after MIIT and decreased after HIIT (p = .09). Fat intake decreased by 16% after HIIT, and increased by 38% after MIIT, with the difference between MIIT and HIIT approaching significance (p = .07).

Conclusions:

This study provides evidence that energy intake compensation differs between MIIT and HIIT.

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Abderraouf Ben Abderrahman, Jacques Prioux, Karim Chamari, Omar Ben Ounis, Zouhair Tabka and Hassane Zouhal

The effect of endurance interval training (IT) on hematocrit (Ht), hemoglobin (Hb), and estimated plasma-volume variation (PVV) in response to maximal exercise was studied in 15 male subjects (21.1 ± 1.1 y; control group n = 6, and training group, n = 9). The training group participated in interval training 3 times a week for 7 wk. A maximal graded test (GXT) was performed to determine maximal aerobic power (MAP) and maximal aerobic speed (MAS) both before and after the training program. To determine Ht, Hb concentration, and lactate concentrations, blood was collected at rest, at the end of GXT, and after 10 and 30 min of recovery. MAP and MAS increased significantly (P < .05) after training only in training group. Hematocrit determined at rest was significantly lower in the training group than in the control group after the training period (P < .05). IT induced a significant increase of estimated PVV at rest for training group (P < .05), whereas there were no changes for control group. Hence, significant relationships were observed after training between PVV determined at the end of the maximal test and MAS (r = .60, P < .05) and MAP (r = .76, P < .05) only for training group. In conclusion, 7 wk of IT led to a significant increase in plasma volume that possibly contributed to the observed increase of aerobic fitness (MAP and MAS).

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Rhona Martin-Smith, Duncan S. Buchan, Julien S. Baker, Mhairi J. Macdonald, Nicholas F. Sculthorpe, Chris Easton, Allan Knox and Fergal M. Grace

beneficial for a number of health outcomes in youth ( 36 , 37 ), many investigations have begun to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of embedding sprint interval training (SIT) interventions within the school environment ( 8 , 9 , 32 , 33 , 51 ). Despite contrasting SIT and high

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Inès Boukabous, Alexis Marcotte-Chénard, Taha Amamou, Pierre Boulay, Martin Brochu, Daniel Tessier, Isabelle Dionne and Eléonor Riesco

reasons ( Craft, Carroll, & Lustyk, 2014 ). In this context, low-volume (75 min/week) high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been recently suggested as a time-efficient strategy to improve body composition, metabolic profile, and cardiorespiratory fitness in inactive adults and in adults living with