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Jade A.Z. Haycraft, Stephanie Kovalchik, David B. Pyne and Sam Robertson

rank correlation coefficient ( p ). Data are presented with 95% confidence intervals. AAA indicates Athletic Abilities Assessment; AFL, Australian Football League; MSFT, multistage fitness test; U, under; VJ, vertical jump. Jump Tests The relationship between VJ and all match activity measures did not

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Yassine Negra, Helmi Chaabene, Senda Sammoud, Olaf Prieske, Jason Moran, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Ali Nejmaoui and Urs Granacher

players. However, technical competency must first be attained before the progression to loaded PJT formats. Jumping Tests Jump performance has been shown to be a valid talent identification marker that can discriminate between potential elite and nonelite youth soccer players. 32 In this study, both PJT

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Mehrez Hammami, Nawel Gaamouri, Gaith Aloui, Roy J. Shephard and Mohamed Souhaiel Chelly

modified Illinois test). Day 2 was devoted to jump tests (squat, countermovement, and countermovement with aimed arms) and the repeated shuttle sprint test. On day 3, anthropometric measurements were followed by the 5-jump test and the Y-balance test. On day 4, a stork test and the repeated sprint T

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Mehrez Hammami, Rodrigo Ramirez-Campillo, Nawel Gaamouri, Gaith Aloui, Roy J. Shephard and Mohamed Souhaiel Chelly

(Microgate, Bolzano, Italy). The second day was devoted to jumping (squat jump, countermovement jump, countermovement jump with arms, and horizontal 5-jump tests) followed by dominant and nondominant handgrip strength assessments. On the third day, anthropometric measurements were followed by determinations

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Joel Garrett, Stuart R. Graham, Roger G. Eston, Darren J. Burgess, Lachlan J. Garrett, John Jakeman and Kevin Norton

to changes in NMF status in this population than a jump test due to the greater task-specific nature. Adding further support to the notion that specificity of the task is fundamental to the capacity of the test to detect NMF. The small CVs observed within the present study for CMJ H , are comparable

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Blair Mills, Brad Mayo, Francisco Tavares and Matthew Driller

-flossing intervention in lesser-trained participants. Furthermore, they also reported a significant treatment and time interaction for FLOSS when compared with CON for a WBLT. The baseline ROM, sprint, and jump test results in the current study were considerably higher/faster than in the previous study by Driller et

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Juan J. Salinero, Cristina González-Millán, Javier Abián-Vicén and Juan Del Coso Garrigós

The goal of dorsiflexion sports shoes is to increase jumping capacity by means of a lower position of the heel in relation to the forefoot which results in additional stretching of the ankle plantar flexors. The aim of this study was to compare a dorsiflexion sports shoe model with two conventional sports shoe models in a countermovement jump test. The sample consisted of 35 participants who performed a countermovement jump test on a force platform wearing the three models of shoes. There were significant differences in the way force was manifested (P < 0.05) in the countermovement jump test, with a decrease in the velocity of the center of gravity and an increase in force at peak power and mean force in the concentric phase. Moreover, peak power was reached earlier with the dorsiflexion sports shoe model. The drop of the center of gravity was increased in CS1 in contrast to the dorsiflexion sports shoe model (P < .05). However, the dorsiflexion sports shoes were not effective for improving either peak power or jump height (P > .05). Although force manifestation and jump kinetics differ between dorsiflexion shoes and conventional sports shoes, jump performance was similar.

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Hichem Souissi, Anis Chaouachi, Karim Chamari, Mohamed Dogui, Mohamed Amri and Nizar Souissi

The purpose of this study was to examine the time-of-day effects on short-term performances in boys. In a balanced and randomized study design, 20 boys performed four anaerobic tests of strength and power (grip strength, Squat-Jump, Five-jump and cycle Wingate tests) at 08:00, 14:00 and 18:00 hr on separate days. The results showed a time-of-day effect on oral temperature. Analysis of variance revealed a significant time-of-day effect for short-term performances for strength, cycle, and jump tests. The post hoc analysis revealed that performances improved significantly from morning to afternoon but no significant differences were noticed between 14:00 and 18:00 hr. The differences between the morning and the afternoon (the highest value measured either at 14:00 or at 18:00 hr) reached 5.9% for grip strength, 3.5% for the squat jump test, 5% for the five jump test, and 5.5% for Ppeak and 6% for Pmean during the Wingate test. A significant positive correlation was found between temperature and short-term performances. In conclusion, a time-of-day effect in the child’s maximal short-term exercise performances exists in relation with core temperature. Such variations would have pronounced effects when expressed in training programs and competitions.

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Ivan Vrbik, Goran Sporiš, Lovro Štefan, Dejan Madić, Nebojša Trajković, Irena Valantine and Zoran Milanović

Purpose:

The number of familiarization sessions in fitness assessments seems to be critical and inconsistent. Therefore, the primary aim of this research was to determine the number of familiarization attempts that stabilize the results in particular physical fitness tests. The secondary aim was to establish the test reliability through familiarization sessions.

Methods:

Thirty-nine primary school children participated in this research (age: 10.8 years, body mass: 40.6 ± 8.9 kg, and body height: 145.3 ± 7.2 cm). During six sessions, with one session every third day, participants performed the following tests to assess explosive strength (vertical jump and standing long jump), coordination (polygon backward and polygon with turn) and flexibility (toe touch).

Results:

The results of repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that there were significant increases (p < .05) in the polygon backward and polygon with turn performances from the first to third familiarization session. The standard error of measurement decreased as sessions progressed, indicating little within subject variation between the coordination test results following a familiarization period. Statistically significant differences were identified in the vertical jump test from the fourth test session compared with the first session. On the other hand, statistically significant differences for the standing long jump test were only found in the final session compared with the initial session. In the toe touch test, there were no significant increases from the first to the final familiarization session. All tests showed high a reliability coefficients, ranging from 0.979 to 0.991.

Conclusion:

Polygon backward and polygon with turn performance may be a practical, reliable method to assess coordination in primary school-aged children. However, completion of at least 3 practice sessions is suggested for participants to obtain a stable score. In addition, both jump tests are feasible for assessing skill-related fitness in young children, although the scientific reliability of the two tests should be questioned and the tests should be tailored to fit the age group of the children.

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Rachel A. Hildebrand, Bridget Miller, Aric Warren, Deana Hildebrand and Brenda J. Smith

Increasing evidence indicates that compromised vitamin D status, as indicated by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D), is associated with decreased muscle function. The purpose of this study was to determine the vitamin D status of collegiate athletes residing in the southern U.S. and its effects on muscular strength and anaerobic power. Collegiate athletes (n = 103) from three separate NCAA athletic programs were recruited for the study. Anthropometrics, vitamin D and calcium intake, and sun exposure data were collected along with serum 25-OH D and physical performance measures (Vertical Jump Test, Shuttle Run Test, Triple Hop for Distance Test and the 1 Repetition Maximum Squat Test) to determine the influence of vitamin D status on muscular strength and anaerobic power. Approximately 68% of the study participants were vitamin D adequate (>75 nmol/L), whereas 23% were insufficient (75–50 nmol/L) and 9%, predominantly non-Caucasian athletes, were deficient (<50 nmol/L). Athletes who had lower vitamin D status had reduced performance scores (p < .01) with odds ratios of 0.85 on the Vertical Jump Test, 0.82 on the Shuttle Run Test, 0.28 on the Triple Hop for Distance Test, and 0.23 on the 1 RM Squat Test. These findings demonstrate that even NCAA athletes living in the southern US are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency and that maintaining adequate vitamin D status may be important for these athletes to optimize their muscular strength and power.